Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | May 2022

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

VOLUME 9, ISSUE 9  MAY 4JUNE 8, 2022

ONLINE AT

Sugar Land95 project focuses on education

MEMORIALIZING THE PAST Fort Bend ISD is rolling out a project designed to honor and educate about 95 individuals unearthed in 2018 at the former Bullhead Convict Labor Camp.

BY HUNTER MARROW

NEXT STEPS

Routine construction in early 2018 for Fort Bend ISD’s James Reese Career and Technical Center led to the unearthing of remains for 95 individuals believed to have died at the Bullhead Convict Labor Camp during Texas’ convict labor leasing program in the late 19th century. Construction on the $59 million James Reese Center eventually hit its target completion date ahead of the 2019-2020 school year. But the discovery of the remains—94 men and one woman—unearthed

Fort Bend ISD plans to train students to become docents or tour guides through summer sessions and workshops. The district is gathering public input to design an outdoor memorial at the cemetery site found next to the James Reese Career and Technical Center.

SOURCE: FORT BEND ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Chassidy Olainu-Alade, Fort Bend ISD’s community engagement coordinator, guides a Sugar Land 95 tour. (Hunter Marrow/Community Impact Newspaper)

CONTINUED ON 18

Supply chain remains challenge for local businesses

“NOONE THOUGHTTHE ECONOMYWOULD REBOUNDAS STRONGAS ITHAS.” PATRICK JANKOWSKI,

BY MIKAH BOYD & HUNTER MARROW

owners experienced supply chain disruptions or delays in February with 26.9% reporting that they do not expect the supply chain to go back to normal until more than a year has passed. According to Keri Schmidt, president and CEO of the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce, supply chain disruptions in the Sugar Land and Missouri CONTINUED ON 20

It has been two years since the COVID-19 pandemic started in the Houston area, and business owners in the Sugar Land and Missouri City area said they con- tinue to feel the eects on supply chains, ination and labor shortages. February survey data from the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas revealed 64.7% of Texas business

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF RESEARCH AT THE GREATER HOUSTON PARTNERSHIP

TxDOT dubs 2021 second- deadliest year

Houston-area property sales up inMarch

IMPACTS

TRANSPORTATION

NEWS BRIEFS

NONPROFIT

6

9

12

17

Support local journalism by donating $120 (total or in monthly installments) and receive

Scan to give today. It's that easy!

without joint pain KEEP YOU MOVING

Live life without joint pain. At Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in Sugar Land, we know that joint pain affects every part of your life. With treatment plans customized for you, our specialists offer a full range of advanced nonsurgical and surgical techniques. Our expert joint care includes: • Innovative pain control methods • Physical therapy to improve mobility and range of motion • The latest technology, including minimally invasive surgical techniques that help reduce recovery time

And, with enhanced safety measures in place, you can rest assured your safety is our priority.

Sugar Land

Schedule an appointment: houstonmethodist.org/jointpain 281.201.0396

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CHOOSE FORT BEND ISD Choose Success

Fort Bend Independent School District is an elite public school

district with proven success. Discover how FBISD students and staff excel in the spring edition of the FBISD Magazine coming to you this May. Whether it is in academics, fine arts, athletics or employment, don’t miss out on your opportunity to Choose Success. Choose Fort Bend ISD!

www.fortbendisd.com/chooseFBISD

3

SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

Expertmen’s healthcare inyour neighborhood.

One in 9 men will develop prostate cancer during their lifetime. However, early diagnosis, active monitoring and treatment alternatives, provides options. Schedule an appointment today. StLukesHealth.org

Sugar Land Hospital

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: This month, we took a local look at a national issue: supply chain shortages. From toilet paper to gasoline, prices have been uctuating signicantly since the pandemic began. We pursued some local insight on the topic. We also included some details on an interesting local nonprot named God’s Garden. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMLAURA: This month, you may notice a slight change in my byline. In April, I made the switch from “Laura Aebi” to “Laura Robb” after marrying the man I have been with for nearly a decade. Both the wedding and honeymoon were wonderful, but I am thrilled to be back to work and I’m ready to bring you the best hyperlocal news from throughout the Sugar Land and Missouri City area. Laura Robb, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez EDITOR Laura Robb REPORTER Hunter Marrow GRAPHIC DESIGNER La’Toya Smith ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Debbie Hamilton METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOWWE'RE FUNDED

Join your neighbors today by giving any amount to the CI Patron program. Funds support our PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% "took action" of some kind. We ask our readers to thank our advertisers by shopping locally.

$20 average donation choose to give monthly 35% edition newsletter called The InCIder and occasionally reach out with other opportunities to directly engage. hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. As a thank you, we'll include you in a special Saturday

245 Commerce Green Blvd., Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 3463682555 PRESS RELEASES slmnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2022 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewsslm

@impactnews_slm

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

5

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

6

W . B E L L F O R

4

59

59

6

3

T

CITY WALK

TEXAS DR. 11

99 TOLL

10

6

TOWN CENTER BLVD.

13

Popjoi

COURTESY POPJOI

PROMENADE WAY

7

90

LAKE POINTE PKWY.

through dine-in service, delivery and ca- tering, opened a new Sugar Land location in Telfair. The Tex-Mex restaurant opened at 13425 University Blvd., Ste. 350, Sugar Land, with a soft opening in early April. The new opening marks the 30th restau- rant for the brand and the second for fran- chisee Manjul Agrawal. 832-500-4056. www.fajitapetes.com 6 Popjoi , a popcorn stand chain selling a variety of original avors—including crunchy jalapeno, bualo and ranch, churro and latte, and maple and bacon— opened inside the H-E-B at 8900 Hwy. 6, Missouri City, in February. The location is the rst Popjoi shop in the United States. The store does not yet have a phone num- ber. www.pop-joi.com 7 Embedo Coee at 14019 Southwest Freeway, Sugar Land, opened April 16, the shop’s owner said. The shop oers many similar coee products to what can be found at any Starbucks, the shop said, in- cluding espressos, lattes and white choco- late mochas. A website for the coee shop is still in progress. 832-722-8443 8 Furniture store Lovesac opened its doors at First Colony Mall on April 8. Located at 16535 Southwest Freeway, Ste. 2001, Sugar Land, the chain retailer specializes in selling separate parts of couches that can be combined in a variety of ways. It also sells home decor, beanbags and outdoor furniture. 713-893-6467. www.lovesac.com COMING SOON 9 Lotus Seafood will open a new restaurant in early May at 2903 S. Main St., Ste. A, Staord. Lotus Seafood will

S. MAIN ST.

9

90

MISSOURI CITY

2

N BLVD.

1092

6

8

5

14

59

SUGAR LAND

12

COMMONWEALTH BLVD.

W Y .

1

2759

6

SIENNA PKWY.

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2022 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Big Mammas Home Cooking held a soft opening April 6 at 8731 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City. The restaurant serves a variety of soul food oerings, including fried chicken, smothered pork chops, red beans with sausage, mac and cheese, and banana pudding. Big Mammas Home Cooking opened after the success of Big Mammas Cooking on Wheels, which opened in fall 2013. Owner O’Neill Gilbert has coached for Texas A&M University, the Houston Oilers and

the Tennessee Titans. 832-440-2984. www.bigmammashomecooking.com 2 Voss Boutique , a new clothing bou- tique store, opened in Sugar Land. Located at 15203 Southwest Freeway, Sugar Land, Voss Boutique held a soft opening March 20. The boutique oers a variety of dresses, including Vietnamese styles and oce clothes, according to its website. The boutique also provides luxe satin sets and tops of various styles. 832-857-4077. www.vossboutique.com 3 Little Caesars opened a new lo- cation in Sugar Land. It opened in

early April at 10581 S. Hwy. 6, Ste. 111, Sugar Land. The pizza chain is known for its pizzas, wings and breadsticks. 281-724-9070. www.littlecaesars.com 4 Kabab Guys , an Indian-Pakistani restaurant oering lunch buets, ca- tering and party trays, opened in early April at 10581 S. Hwy. 6, Sugar Land. The restaurant oers biryani, a variety of curries, beef and chicken kebab, and a party hall available for up to 150 guests. 346-874-7939. www.kababguys.com 5 Fajita Pete’s , the Tex-Mex restau- rant franchise oering a variety of fajitas

          

   €‚ƒ  „…†‡ €ˆ ‰ ‚€ Š‹Œ ‡Ž…

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY HUNTER MARROW

9

10

Lotus Seafood

Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar

COURTESY LOTUS SEAFOOD

COURTESY LAZY DOG RESTAURANT & BAR

oer a variety of seafood options, includ- ing fried catsh lets, shrimp and oys- ters; combo specials, including its Loud Pack and Hot Box; and other nonseafood options, including chicken wings, rice and noodles. www.lotus-seafood.com 10 Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar is eyeing a June opening for its Staord restaurant at 12223 Southwest Freeway, Staord. Designed to feel like a Rocky Mountain Wyoming escape, Lazy Dog’s interior will be complete with lodge-in- spired furnishings, including replaces, ledge stone, a chandelier crafted from Aspen logs and artwork reminiscent of the Cowboy State. An outdoor patio will be built around a cozy repit and lounge area. The restaurant oers a variety of starters, small plates, sandwiches, burg- ers, meat and hot dogs. 281-982-1470. www.lazydogrestaurants.com 11 German Doner Kebab , an interna- tional fast-casual brand oering gourmet kebabs, is coming soon to Sugar Land Town Square. With the help of Harrison, a Dallas-based global design consulting rm, German Doner Kebab USA will bring the Sugar Land restaurant to 2148 Texas Drive, Sugar Land, this summer. In addition to kebabs, GDK oers burgers, quesadillas and wraps along with a variety of sides. www.germandonerkebab.com 12 The Honor Roll School , a private, nonsectarian, co-educational day school in Sugar Land, will soon open a new campus in Missouri City. Located at 20417 University Blvd., Missouri City, in Riverstone, the new campus is slated to open in August and will serve children from 2 years old through kindergarten, the school announced March 22. The

new campus will be located 5 miles from the Sugar Land location and will feature nearly 18,000 square feet, including 13 classrooms, designated areas for ne arts and dance, multiple outdoor playgrounds and eld space, according to the announcement. 281-609-9194. www.thehonorrollschool.com RENOVATIONS 13 Renovations at Constellation Field , the home of the Sugar Land Space Cow- boys Triple A baseball team, were unveiled April 2 at 1 Stadium Dr., Sugar Land. The project involved a complete renovation of the second-level club and suite area, which will now be named the Regions Bank Club, along with renovations to the Constella- tion Field concourse level, which include the addition of the Karbach Cantina, a renovated playground and splash pad area, a team store, an interactive fan area and exclusive group areas. Additional reno- vations include the Kiddie Corral, which serves as the playground area for the park, and a new simulated baseball experience. www.milb.com/sugar-land 14 Senior living community The Avenues of Fort Bend celebrated the completion of renovations to its facility, located at 3505 FM 1092, Missouri City, April 7. The renovations began in March and included updates to the facility’s com- mon areas and dining room. The Avenues of Fort Bend provides assisted living along with memory care for residents living with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The center oers daily activities in addition to pet-friendly apartments and outdoor spaces. 281-336-9998. www.civitasse- niorliving.com/the-avenues-of-fort-bend

Park amenities will include a gathering space and entry feature to the Freedom Tree, a vegetated buer, a stage, an area for public art, pergolas and playgrounds.

COURTESY MISSOURI CITY

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Missouri City City Council approved a contract for design services for 4.94 acres of undeveloped parkland at FreedomTree Park . Following the Civil War, slavery was ocially put to an end in Texas on June 19, 1865 through a proclamation made in Galveston. According to “Historic Fort Bend: An Illustrated History” by Andrea Guy Halat, after the proclamation, slaves at the nearby Palmer Plantation gathered around the tree to learn that they were free, giving the Freedom Tree its name. The Missouri City City Council voted 6-1 during its April 18 meeting to execute a $342,990 design contract with engineering and architectural rm Hal Associates, which has led discussions with the city’s Freedom Tree Committee since 2020 to develop a conceptual design, according to agenda documents. Amenities that will be added to Freedom Tree Park include a gathering space and entry feature to the Freedom Tree, a vegetated buer, a stage, and an area for public art—as well as multiple pergolas and playgrounds. According to Jason Mangum, Missouri City’s director of parks and recreation, the total cost of designing and

implementing the project is $3.16 million. The contract will pay for the initial site investigation and base map preparation, permitting, bidding, geotechnical work and construction observation, according to agenda documents. Additionally, Mangum said city ocials do not foresee any signicant changes to the project’s design. “We’ve done a lot of legwork on this project and involved the community every step of the way. We’re fairly condent we’re not going to have a lot of changes [on] the design,” he said. Construction on Freedom Tree Park is expected to begin in early 2023 and last until early 2024, he said. 281-403-8500. www.missouricitytx.gov

K

MISTY HOLLOW DR.

N

SUGAR LAND/STAFFORD AREA OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE!

10707 Corporate Drive

12603 Southwest Frwy

10701 Corporate Drive

S C A N

Building Signage Available

Monument Signage Available

Monument Signage Available

BUILDING AMENITIES

COWORKING AVAILABLE NOW!

EXECUTIVE SUITES AVAILABLE Offices starting from $350/month Includes Conference Room Private Offices • Wifi• Short Term Leases

• On-site Property Management & Leasing • On-site Courtesy Officer • Renovated Common Areas • Space Available Up to 16,000 SF

• Short Term Leases • Furnished Offices • Designated Desk • Virtual Address • Conference Facilities

10701 Corporate Dr #155 Stafford, TX 77477

www.LandParkCo.com

CALL NOW! 713.789.2200

Matt Easterling 713.325.4112 measterling@landparkco.com

Bill McGrath, CCIM 281.598.9860 bmcgrath@landparkco.com

7

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

MAY 9-13

Celebrating Innovating and Disruptive Patterns that encourage new Opportunities in Richmond’s Business Community! MON, MAY 9 | 10 AM-1PM | “GET HIRED” Career Fair Safari Texas Ranch: 11627 FM 1464, Richmond, TX 77407 (Business Casual is Required)

Partners

Safari Texas Ranch

RSVP for these events by contacting Economic Development Director, Jerry W. Jones Jr. jjones@richmondtx.gov or by registering on Events Brite TUES, MAY 10 | 4:30-8 PM | “SYTES AND BYTES OF RICHMOND” Ford Bend Museum Lawn: 410 S 5th St, Richmond, TX 77469 (Family and Friends Invited) WED, MAY 11 | 6-8 PM | “DRINKS & DEVELOPMENT” THURS, MAY 12 | 9-10:30 AM | INFRASTRUcTURE BREAKFAST MEETING Small Business Breakfast Morton Lodge: 211 Morton St, Richmond, TX 77469 FRI, MAY 13 | 5-8 PM | LIVE AFTER 5 Boutique & Vendor Crawl Shops and Vendors fro Jax & 7th to Morton St, (Food, Music, and Fun)

Independent Living | Assisted Living | Memory Care

( 832 ) 225-4590

TheDelaneyat P ARKWAY L AKES .com 21700 B ELLAIRE B OULEVARD | R ICHMOND , TX 77407

AL Facility ID# 106971

The all new Sportage. Move in new ways.

Introducing the 2023 Sportage LX

Starting at $25,990 *

Boasts 32 Highway MPG and 25 City MPG! This Kia Sportage delivers a Regular Unleaded I-45 2.5 L/152 engine powering this Automatic transmission. Wheels: 18’ Machined Alloy, Vinyl Door Trim Insert, Trip Computer. This Kia Sportage Comes Equipped with these options: Transmission: 8-Speed Automatic - inc: drive mode select (normal, smart, sport, snow), Transmission w/Driver Selectable Mode, Towing Equipment -inc: Trailer Sway Control, Tires: 235/60R18 AS, Tire Specific Low Tire Pressure Warning, Tailgate/Rear Door Lock Included w/Power Door Locks, Systems Monitor, Strut Front Suspension w/Coil Springs, Steel Spare Wheel, Smart Device Remote Engine Start. *Starting MSRP” price is manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) for lowest model trim. MSRP excludes destination and handling charges, taxes, title, license, options, and dealer charges. Actual price set by dealer and may vary.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT declares 2021 second-deadliest year for Texas roadways; trac deaths up 15%over 2020

COMPILED BY MIKAH BOYD & HUNTER MARROW

UPCOMING PROJECTS

NEW TERRITORY BLVD.

69

Roadways are becoming increas- ingly deadly, according to a news release from the Texas Department of Transportation that detailed ndings that are part of a larger issue nation- wide. TxDOT reported more than 4,480 deaths on Texas roads in 2021, only a little behind 1981, the deadliest year to date with over 4,701 deaths. Roadway deaths are also on the rise nationwide. Ocials reported an estimated 20,160 people died from vehicular crashes in the rst half of 2021, 18.4% higher than in 2020. Texas saw an increase of almost 15% from 2020-21. TxDOT elaborated on the shared responsibility among Texas drivers, roadway engineers and law enforce- ment to reduce the number of deaths on Texas roads. “Driver behavior is one of the causes but also one of the most important solutions,” Transportation Commissioner Laura Ryan said in a news release. “This is not blame. These are facts. We all have a role. TxDOT can do more, and we accept that responsibility. The driving public can do more. For instance, in 2021, a total of 1,522 people were killed because of speed, and a total of 1,219 were killed because they were not wearing a seat belt. These were decisions made by people that could have potentially saved 2,741 lives.” Art Markman, a psychology professor at The University of Texas, informed TxDOT leaders and trans- portation stakeholders at the annual

TRAFFIC TRAGEDIES While most trac crashes did not result in injuries, thousands of Texans died

TELLAR AVE.

LEXINGTON BLVD.

or faced serious injuries on the roads in 2021. Reported vehicle crashes in Texas in 2021

N

University Boulevard widening On April 19, Sugar Land City Council approved a $250,000 design contract and a $1.6 million agreement with Fort Bend County for widening University Boulevard from New Territory Boule- vard to south of Lexington Boulevard. The project was included in four general obligation bond propositions totaling $90.76 million approved by Sugar Land voters on Nov. 5, 2019. The projects included in the propositions cover drainage, facilities, mobility and safety and were selected based on extensive planning through various master plans, City Council input and the results of citizen satisfaction surveys that indicated drainage, public safety and mobility are the top three priorities for residents. University Boulevard acts as a north- south regional corridor that provides access for mobility, access to recre- ational amenities and supports tourism and economic development eorts, the city said in an April 20 announcement. ”This University Boulevard corridor has seen tremendous growth in trac during the past 15 years,” said City En- gineer Jessie Li in the release. “Our res- idents have been clear on the continued need to invest in mobility projects.” Timeline: TBD Cost: $1.6 million Funding source: Sugar Land bond

Noninjuries

1.07M

137.4K Possible injuries 100.4K Unknown injuries

“WEMUST DOBETTERFOR OURSELVES, OUR LOVED ONES ANDOUR LARGER COMMUNITYOF TEXANS.” LAURA RYAN, TRANSPORTATION COMMISSIONER

82.5K Suspected minor injuries 19.4K Suspected serious injuries

4.5K Fatalities

SOURCE: TEXAS PEACE OFFICER’S CRASH REPORTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Texas Transportation Forum in February about coronavirus-related pressures that have had a negative impact on Texas roadways. “We have to remind people that they are part of a community,” Markman said. “We have to start considering everyone as part of our community. If we don’t do that, there are going to be all sorts of negative consequences, and those are going to include negative conse- quences on the road.” The release provided information on initiatives TxDOT is researching and studying before implementing to aid in roadway safety. Some of the initiatives include trac safety cam- paigns and law enforcement funding grants as well as proven life-saving

roadway designs. TxDOT is also reviewing crash data to identify areas where drivers are more likely to crash and will use its ndings to focus improvement initiatives on those areas and share the data with the driving population. Ocials within the agency believe the implementation of the above ini- tiatives and focusing on engineering and enforcement will greatly reduce the number of deaths on Texas roads. “But make no mistake: This is an urgent call to action for all of us behind the wheel,” Ryan said. “We can do bet- ter. We should do better. We must do better—for ourselves, our loved ones and our larger community of Texans. Not a single death on our roadways is acceptable. Let’s end this streak.”

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 22. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

Sugar Land 16312 Southwest Freeway Sugar Land, TX 77479 Rosenberg 4002 FM 762, Ste. 100 Rosenberg, TX 77469

Long Meadow 7101 W. Grand Parkway S., Ste.180 Richmond, TX 77407

Because wrapping your kids in bubble wrap isn’t an option. Open 9am – 9pm, 7 days a week

Sienna 8720 Highway 6, Ste. 400 Missouri City, TX 77459

9

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

Keep an eye out for our Grand Opening Announcement The Perfect Round Indoor Golf, Bar & Grille

The Perfect Round provides a unique golf-centered bar & lounge setting, with craft beer and cocktails. Craft beer on tap Mixology Events Leagues

DEMAND MORE FROM YOUR PRIMARY CARE EXPERIENCE Board-certified physicians Evening and weekend hours Many convenient locations

TM

For information call 281-363-1336 www.ThePerfectRoundGolf.com We deliver the ultimate indoor golfing experience with our award-winning GOLFZON simulators, in a cozy pub presence with top-notch service and hospitality.

Call 713- 589 - 3999 today to schedule an in-person or virtual appointment. Or book online at villagemedical.com Se habla Espanol. *Patients always have a choice of pharmacy. Village Medical at Walgreens is operated by Village Medical Management, LLC and affiliated professional corporations that are qualified to provide medical services through their licensed healthcare professionals (referred to for these purposes as “Village Medical”). The healthcare providers at Village Medical at Walgreens are employees of Village Medical or its affiliates and are not employees, associates and/or agents of Walgreens.LLC or its affiliates; they are not employees or agents of Walgreens. **Accepted insurance plans vary by market. Reach out to your local Village Medical clinic location to confirm coverage.

6619 West Cross Creek Bend • Fulshear, TX 77441

Event to Life BRING YOUR NEXT

Whether it’s a corporate event or a social celebration, make it special at South Shore Harbour Resort . Group room rate specials are avai lable.

2500 South Shore Blvd. League City, TX 77573 SSHR.COM | 281-334-1000 BOOK YOUR EVENT AT Located Halfway Between Houston And Galveston, On Clear Lake.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GOVERNMENT Newcitymanager put on leave

provide you and the public with more details, but the matter was discussed in a closed executive session pur- suant to state law, and disclosure of additional information regarding this particular matter could subject the city to legal liability and could interfere with the City Council’s decision-making process regarding this important personnel matter,” Elackatt said in an email. When Jackson’s contract of $210,000 a year was approved by City Council on Dec. 6, he said in an interviewwith Community Impact Newspaper that he wanted to bring stability to the role. “There’s been some turmoil there and a couple of city managers that came and went fairly quickly,” Jackson said in the December interview. “Citizens and the City Council want to

see stability back in that building.” During the 60-day leave, Sedrick Cole, the city’s chief information ocer, will be the acting city manager, Crain said in an email.

BY HUNTER MARROW

Director of Communications Tara Pow- drill Crain said via email the city does not comment on personnel issues. The action comes after Jackson was hired for the position Nov. 30 following a six-month search to ll the role. The position was made available in April 2021, when City Council terminated the employment contract of former City Manager Odis Jones without cause. In May 2021, Assistant City Manager Bill Atkinson was named interim city manager. City ocials were unable to provide comments about personnel matters due to potential legal repercussions, Mayor Robin Elackatt said in an email. “I certainly wish that I could

Charles “Tink” Jackson, the recently hired city manager for Missouri City, has been placed on paid administrative leave. Jackson was placed on administra- tive leave through a 6-1 City Council vote during a special meeting April 4. Council Member Vashaundra Edwards, who initially made a motion to dismiss Jackson from his position, voted against putting Jackson on leave. The exact reason for the action was unclear, though Council Member Lynn Clouser said in her motion that Jackson was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation that will last for no more than 60 days.

CHARLES “TINK” JACKSON

In an April 12 meeting, City Council voted to hire Austin-based law rm DeDe Church & Associates for a “per- sonnel inquiry,” Crain said via email. The rm oers expertise in investigat- ing employee complaints, among other services, according to its website. After press time on April 29, Missouri City City Council scheduled meetings on April 29 and April 30 to discuss personnel matters, according to city documents.

SEEKING STABILITY Missouri City leadership has been in a state of continuous transition over the course of more than two years.

July 2020: Odis Jones is hired by a 4-3 split City Council vote.

April 2021: City Council votes 5-2 to re Jones, eective immediately.

May 2021: Bill Atkinson, previous Assistant City Manager, is approved as interim city manager.

November 2021: Charles “Tink” Jackson is selected as new city manager.

April 2022: Jackson is placed on administrative leave for up to 60 days. SOURCE: CITY OF MISSOURI CITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

February 2020: Anthony Snipes is red as Missouri City city manager after ve years in the role.

Get a $25 signing bonus without breaking a sweat.

Student Checking

that fits you to a

At Trustmark, you don’t have to be an athlete to get a signing bonus. In fact, we’ll give you $25 just for opening your Student Checking account. There’s no monthly maintenance fee, plus, you can access your money anytime, anywhere with mobile banking. Learn more at trustmark.com/studentchecking.

Disclosures: Minimum $50 deposit required to open. To receive the $25 credit, the Student Checking account must be opened between March 21 - June 30, 2022, remain open for 30 days and have a balance greater than $0.00 at the time of the credit. The $25 credit will be deposited into the account on the next business day after 30 days from the date of account opening. Limit of one $25 credit per account.

11

SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

NEWS BRIEFS

Houston-area property sales rise year over year despite hurdles

BY GEORGE WIEBE

According to the HAR, the number of single-fam- ily homes on the market between $150,000- $249,999 decreased by 36.9% compared to last March. Meanwhile, homes between $500,000- $999,999 saw a 36.1% increase, the largest year- over-year growth of any price range. The average number of days a home spends on the market decreased from 46 in March 2021 to 38 in March of this year, according to the HAR. The total months of inventory—the estimated amount of time it would take to deplete property in the market—was at 1.3 months for single-family

RISING PRICES MEDIAN PRICE FOR SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES

Property sales in the Houston area increased 4.3% in March compared to the previous year, according to an April 13 news release from the Houston Association of Realtors. Despite a rise in interest rates and a 2.1% decrease in year-over-year housing supply, there is no indica- tion of a slowing housing market, the release said. “We are experiencing unprecedented market conditions in Houston with a frenetic pace of homebuying,” HAR Chair Jennifer Wauhob said in the release.

March 2021 $290K

March 2022 $335K

+15.5%

SOURCE: HOUSTON ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

homes in March. A supply of six months of inven- tory is considered a “balanced market,” according to the National Association of Realtors.

Texas safety task force releases final Astroworld report

Missouri City police adopts 911 livestream

BY SOFIA GONZALES

many more taken to the hospital for critical injuries. The task force was created on Nov. 21 to create a list of concert safety recommendations. It identified gaps in planning that led to the escalation. The report said the use of an on-site command and control structure would have allowed for an authority to stop the concert to address safety concerns. The report said the chain of command must be clearly communicated and doc- umented. It said communication is key when seconds matter. The report said event pro- moters should identify poten- tially necessary emergency services and have those teams employed. The report also found a lack of permitting consis- tency and issued permitting

“CHAINOF COMMANDMUST BE CLEARLY COMMUNICATED ANDDOCUMENTED. COMMUNICATION IS KEYWHEN SECONDSMATTER.” THE FINAL ASTROWORLD REPORT

Governor Greg Abbott, alongside his Texas Task Force on Concert Safety, released the final report on concert safety in an effort to ensure another incident like Travis Scott’s Astroworld does not happen again. Scott, a musician raised in Mis- souri City, was the main headliner on the first day of the festival on Nov. 5, 2021. Hours before Scott took the stage, unticketed fans hopped the fence and broke down barricades to attend the event. During the concert, there were reports of injuries tied to crowd surges, overwhelming staff. The Houston Police Department initiated a self-response, the report said, which is what led to the decla- ration of a mass casualty event. The report said 10 people died due to the crowd compression, with

BY HUNTER MARROW

The Missouri City Police Department has begun livestreaming 911 emergency calls directly to officers in the field in real time, marking the first Texas police agency to adopt the technology, according to a March 31 news release fromMissouri City officials. The technology, called Live911, allows officers to hear the caller’s words and voice and is designed to provide a sense of urgency, details that might not be shared otherwise and immediate updates on the situation, according to the release. Live911 is designed to close the time gap between when 911 calls are received to when officers are dispatched by allowing officers to hear incoming 911 emergency calls in their geographical area, according to the release. The technology allows officers to obtain more information to devise a response plan.

recommendations. Other recommendations

included more training, prepar- ing for any foreseeable hazards, enforcing a code of conduct and analyzing the social media of the crowd and the artist in real time to detect a change in mood.

New risk ratingmeans changing flood insurance premiums

the shift would address “inequities in the existing pricing methodology,” that resulted in some households being overcharged for their policies while others were undercharged. The new regulation will cap increases for individual policies at 18%. According to FEMA’s fact sheets, under the old regulation, prices would increase “indefinitely.”

BY JISHNU NAIR

The National Flood Insurance Program allows for the purchase of federally-backed flood insurance, which is required for buildings in high flood-risk areas that have federally-backed loans. The Federal Emergency

Management Agency announced Risk Rating 2.0 on April 1, 2021, and put the first phase into effect for new policyholders on Oct. 1, 2021. As of April 1, all policyholders are now subject to the new rating model. In its announcement, FEMA said

On April 1, all existing flood insurance policies under the National Flood Insurance Program saw an update to their pricing methodology under a new risk evaluation system, Risk Rating 2.0.

PREMIUMPRICE CHANGES

As of April, FEMA’s pricing methodology for flood insurance changed to the Risk Rating 2.0 system, resulting in policy increases for most residents in five local ZIP codes.

SOURCES: MYCITY HOUSTON OPEN DATA, FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

77459

77478

77479

77489

77498

4.8% policies will decrease

3.6% policies will decrease

1.3% policies will decrease

4.4% policies will decrease

2.1% policies will decrease

95.4% policies will increase

96.5% policies will increase

98.8% policies will increase

95.6% policies will increase

97.9% policies will increase

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMissouri City, Sugar Land & Fort Bend County

NUMBER TOKNOW awarded by Fort Bend County Commissioners Court to seven local nonprofits $404,578 CITY HIGHLIGHTS SUGAR LAND On April 5, Sugar

Missouri City officials rename Confederate streets

BY HUNTER MARROW

NEWNAME

MISSOURI CITY Two more city streets bearing the Con- federate name have been changed—two years after two similarly-named Missouri City streets were also renamed. At an April 18 City Council meeting, officials unanimously voted to rename Confederate Court as Prosperity Court and Confederate South Drive as Prosperity South Drive. The two streets are located in the Vicksburg subdivision, which contains other streets that bear names of Confeder- ate generals, including Bedford Forrest Court, which shares a name with Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The cost to change the name will be $633.51 for one inter- section-control sign at Confederate Court and Truesdale Drive. The cost for Confederate South Drive was estimated

TRUESDALE DR.

CONFEDERATE CT. PROSPERITY CRT.

HURRICANE LN.

Land City Council approved a $2.5 million drainage project to alleviate Riverbend street flooding. It will begin in May and conclude in November.

CONFEDERATE SOUTH DR.

PROSPERITY SOUTH DR.

BRECKINRIDGE CT.

N

at $335, according to agenda documents. U.S. Rep. Al Green of Texas’ 9th Congressional District, which includes most of Missouri City, is covering the costs, said Jeffrey Boney, Missouri City mayor pro tem. “I wanted to thank the residents who stepped up to the plate to come together to ensure that this name change took place,” Boney said.

Sugar Land City Council will meet at 5:30 p.m. p.m. May 10 at 2700 Town Center Blvd. N., Sugar Land. Meetings are livestreamed and in person. 281-275-2900. www.sugarlandtx.gov Missouri City City Council will meet at 5:30 p.m. May 16 at 1522 Texas Parkway, Missouri City. Meetings are livestreamed and in person. 281-403-8500. www.missouricitytx.gov Fort Bend County Commissioners Court will meet at 1 p.m. May 10 at 401 Jackson St., Richmond. Meetings are livestreamed and in person. 281-342-3411. www.fortbendcountytx.gov MEETINGSWE COVER

County officials award CDBG funding

Grant funds by commissioners on April 12 as part of the fiscal year 2021- 22 Consolidated Annual Action Plan approved in September. The CDBG Entitlement Program is administered by the county’s commu- nity development department, which develops programs and funding prior- ities, according to county documents.

The program aims to develop viable urban communities to the benefit of low- and moderate-income persons. Fort Bend County officials are still in the process of devel- oping its 2021 Action Plan for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, according to Fort Bend County’s website.

BY ASIA ARMOUR

FORT BEND COUNTY Seven nonprofit organizations in Fort Bend County were awarded $404,578 from Community Development Block

GREGG MATTE, PASTOR MALCOLM MARSHALL, CAMPUS PASTOR

SUNDAYS @ 8 :30A, 9:45A & 11:15A 4309 SIENNA PARKWAY HOUSTONSFIRST.ORG

13

SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

Paid Advertisement

MEMORIAL HERMANN SUGAR LAND HOSPITAL OFFERING IMPORTANT REMINDERS DURING WOMEN’S HEALTH MONTH

Care for Families from Childbirth and Beyond Another component of women’s overall health is their reproductive care, which may be provided by a primary care physician or a gynecologist, who specializes in reproductive health. Often these physicians also have distinct training in obstetrics to manage pregnancy and childbirth. “Fort Bend is fortunate to have in its backyard the Family Birth Center at Memorial Hermann Sugar Land and skilled obstetricians and pediatricians to care for women and children,” said Kelli Burroughs, MD, an obstetrician and gynecologist who serves as chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Memorial Hermann Sugar Land in addition to her thriving private practice. “We know how important taking care of women during their pregnancy is to mothers, and we also know they want trusted care for their children.” Memorial Hermann Sugar Land offers specialized care for children in its intermediate medical unit and has affiliated pediatric subspecialists who are skilled at caring for children. And with the only dedicated children’s emergency room in Fort Bend County, the hospital is uniquely prepared to care for the youngest members of the community. Additionally, a Child Life specialist aims to make children’s healthcare experience more positive by explaining to themwhat to expect during hospitalization or how to cope with the illness or injury of a family member. Holistic Care for Women “Women are usually thrilled to see their doctor when they are awaiting the birth of their baby but become less enthusiastic as they age and experience what they consider embarrassing problems,” Dr. Burroughs said. “We want women to understand that reproductive health follows their whole life span, and it can be even more important to see a gynecologist regularly before and after their childbearing years.” Teenagers, for example, may seek the care of a gynecologist for management of heavy or painful periods, acne or other female-related concerns. Dr. Burroughs recommends women, 21 years of age and older, make yearly appointments with a gynecologist for a well- woman exam. Like a primary care physician, gynecologists also conduct physical exams, which can reveal abnormalities in the vagina, cervix, uterus, ovaries and pelvic f loor. They also perform regular PAP tests, which are used to check for cervical cancer.

In celebration of May beingWomen’s HealthMonth, Memorial Hermann Sugar Land Hospital reminds all women to make their health a priority and connects women to key services to help them stay healthy all year. “Women tend to care for their families first and often neglect their own health,” said Divya Gupta, MD, a primary care physicianwithMemorial HermannMedical Group Sweetwater. “They may wait until they experience illness or symptoms. At that point, they may have chronic, life-threatening health conditions, including heart disease, diabetes or high cholesterol, and not even know it.” Keeping Up with Your Health To-Dos Dr. Gupta says it’s important for women to visit their primary care doctor at least once a year for an annual physical, along with blood drawn, and to discuss any necessary vaccinations or health screenings, such as mammograms or colonoscopy, that may be recommended for their age or for their personal or family health history. Dr. Gupta says these yearly exams and recommended screenings help identify potential problems early before a disease has progressed and might not be as easy to treat. Dr. Gupta also says these annual appointments help women know important indicators of their health. “Women should know their blood pressure, cholesterol numbers and blood sugar levels so that if any of these change – indicating potential disease progression-- we can address it,” she said. She also uses these yearly visits to answer health questions and educate patients about proper weight, nutrition and exercise, as well as mental and emotional health, to help them take an active role in their own wellbeing. “We would like women to think of their primary doctors as partners who can help them be their healthiest,” Dr. Gupta said.

Divva Gupta, MD Primary Care Physician

Kelli Burroughs, MD Obstetrician & Gynecologist

Nina Dereska, MD, FPMRS Urogynecologist

Melissa Felinski, DO Bariatric Surgeon

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Additionally, gynecologists assess women’s breast health, often encouraging mammograms and other breast imaging that can uncover benign breast conditions or breast cancer. “We really look at women’s health holistically and encourage them to pay close attention to their reproductive health and its impact on their overall health,” Dr. Burroughs said. “Often, through our conversations with our patients, we can pinpoint other health problems that may need addressing.” Pelvic Floor Health One area in which gynecologists often find problems during regular checkups is the pelvic f loor. Pelvic f loor disorders, which include overactive bladder, sexual dysfunction, urinary and fecal incontinence (leaking), pelvic pain and prolapse (dropping) of organs located in the pelvis, affect roughly 25 percent of U.S. women, according to the National Institutes of Health. Many times, these problems go unreported because women are too embarrassed to discuss their symptoms with their primary physician or gynecologist. Memorial Hermann Sugar Land’s Pelvic Health Program makes it easy for patients to get comprehensive treatment for these conditions close to home with a multidisciplinary team of urogynecologists, urologists, gastroenterologists, colorectal surgeons and pelvic f loor physical therapists. Urogynecologist Nina Dereska, MD, FPMRS, an assistant professor at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth Houston and director for the Pelvic Health Program at Memorial Hermann Sugar Land, cares for women off all ages with pelvic f loor disorders. Though many pelvic f loor issues are more common after childbearing or menopause, several conditions, including recurrent bladder infections, interstitial cystitis or painful bladder syndrome and overactive bladder, are common in young women. Treatments are available for nearly every pelvic f loor condition, Dr. Dereska says, and many do not involve surgery. Overactive bladder, for example, can be managed with behavioral therapy, over-the-counter and prescriptionmedications, acupuncture and Botox® injections. If surgery is necessary, minimally invasive treatments include urethral injections, single-incision slings for urinary stress incontinence, vaginal surgery and laparoscopic or robot-assisted surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. Minimally invasive surgery typically provides a quicker recovery with smaller incisions, decreased blood loss and a shorter hospital stay.

“Quality of life if so important and addressing pelvic f loor concerns can improve confidence and overall wellbeing,” Dr. Dereska said. Weight Management and Wellness Body weight and weight management play another key role in women’s health. Many women struggle with trying to reach and maintain a healthy weight, often after childbirth or during menopause. They can feel helpless, starting a cycle of unhealthy behaviors that often leads to more weight gain. For women who are overweight, defined by a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 to 29, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, medical weight management that is overseen by a nutritionist or physician can help improve eating habits and encourage lifestyle changes. But for women who are considered morbidly obese, with a BMI of 35 or more along with another health condition, or with a BMI of 40 or more without another health condition, weight-loss surgery may be necessary to prevent serious complications. “People who are significantly overweight are at a higher risk for various health problems, including heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, joint problems, sleep apnea, mental health struggles, certain types of cancers and COVID-19,” said Melissa Felinski, DO, a bariatric surgeon who serves as an assistant professor of surgery at McGovern Medical School and is the assistant program director of the Advanced Gastrointestinal/Minimally Invasive, Bariatric and Robotic Surgery Fellowship program at UTHealth Houston. Affiliated withMemorial Hermann Sugar Land and its comprehensive surgical weight loss program, NewStart™, Dr. Felinski says that obesity is attributed to a person’s biology, individual genetics, lifestyle and environmental factors, as well as hormones. Because of that complexity, she says, only a small percentage of people can successfully lose a large amount of weight and keep it off with diet and exercise alone. “Our program at Memorial Hermann Sugar Land offers bariatric surgery, along with support to help sustain long-termweight loss,” she said. The importance of women’s health is recognized throughout the year byMemorial Hermann Sugar Land. That’s why the hospital offers key services to help women in the Fort Bend area reach and maintain their optimal health.

Learn more at memorialhermann.org/fortbendfamilies

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

15

SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • MAY 2022

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28

communityimpact.com

Powered by