Bay Edition - August 2021

BAY AREA EDITION

2021 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

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VOLUME 4, ISSUE 1  AUG. 27SEPT. 23, 2021

Personalizing education Clear Creek ISD invests in individualized learning

Making changes Clear Creek ISD leaders began assessing learning gaps and needs, such as social and emotional supports, on individual campuses in August. Evaluation is happening in waves to ensure thorough, intentional work across all 45 campuses, ocials said.

Elementary school

Intermediate school

High school

Wave 1 Nine of the district’s 27 elementary schools as well as all eight high schools will be evaluated in the 2021-22 school year.

Wave 2 The second wave in 2022-23 will include another third of the elementary schools and another ve intermediate schools.

Wave 3 The remaining nine elementary and ve intermediate campuses will be evaluated during the nal wave in 2023-24.

IMPACTS

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2021

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

In an eort to foster academic and character growth, Clear Creek ISD o- cials will focus eorts in the next three years on personalizing student and sta learning. This involves giving students the agency to take ownership of their education through the use of technol- ogy and customized supports, such as DreamBox, a math program designed to adapt to both elementary stu- dents’ answers and problem-solving approach, CCISD ocials said. The philosophy also includes bol- stering social and emotional learning, CONTINUED ON 22

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

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SOURCE: CLEAR CREEK ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BayArea restaurant owners struggle to ll job openings

UNEMPLOYMENT SINCE THE PANDEMIC The unemployment rate in the Houston-The Woodlands- Sugar Land area dipped below 7% in May for the rst time since the pandemic began, though it increased to 7.4% in June.

BUSINESS FEATURE

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BY JAKE MAGEE & EVA VIGH

15% 12% 9% 6% 3% 0%

14%

In March 2020, restaurants across the country faced a crisis as COVID-19 forced eateries to scale back or close altogether. While many Bay Area restaurants tried inno- vative ways, such as curbside service, to survive, some could not and were forced to close. Now, while case counts rise again, local restaurants face another crisis: workforce shortages. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board, the public workforce system in the 13-county Houston-Galveston region, found the restaurant industry had the second-highest CONTINUED ON 28

7.4%

5.5%

2020 2021 SOURCE: U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BAY AREA EDITION • AUGUST 2021

These are challenging times for Greater Houston communities contending with yet another wave of COVID-19. The serious illness and loss of life is a tragedy for affected families, and it is taking a physical and emotional toll on medical professionals. As CEO of St. Luke’s Health, which includes Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center (the research and teaching hospital for Baylor College of Medicine) and St. Joseph Health in Brazos Valley, I am seeing the number of patients with the coronavirus grow each day. Per data from the Texas state epidemiologist, 75% of new COVID-19 cases are reported to be a result of the highly transmissible Delta variant. The average age for admission in our hospitals has dropped by approximately 15 years, making 40-45 the age range most affected. While we’ve learned from the past COVID-19 surges, the Delta variant poses new challenges to our critical safety net, impacting both the cost of providing care and the number of doctors and nurses needed to staff hospitals. Last year, nearly 21,000 healthcare providers responded to the American Medical Association’s COVID-19 for Caregivers Survey. The respon- dents cited that coping with the fear of exposing themselves and their families to disease, as well as constant work overloads and burnout, are all part of their daily routines. The stress of working during a pandemic has caused many to retire early or leave the healthcare profession entirely. The result is that there are shortages in critical areas, such as nursing, and the overall cost of maintaining our hospital’s labor force has increased dramatically. We are actively working with our insurance companies regarding this escalating cost of providing healthcare and I remain hopeful that we will be able to partner with the payor community to ensure that we are paid fairly for this important work and continue to be in the best position to provide high value care to the communities that we serve. Our patients are the reason we come to work every day. Providing them with exceptional care is a responsibility we welcome and one that we will always honor as we work to ensure the trust of St. Luke’s Health is the best place to give and receive care and while I am always willing to talk about our caregivers and the best-value care and essential services they provide, it is very nice when someone else will do that for you. Caring for the Caregivers

Each year, U.S. News and World Report reports on the nation’s best hospitals and best specialties. Last week, the magazine recognized Baylor St . Luke’s Medical Center (Baylor St . Luke’s) as a Best Hospital nationally for 2021-22. For the 2021-22 rankings and ratings, U.S. News evaluated more than 4,750 medical centers nationwide. Additionally, Baylor St. Luke’s was ranked nationally in the following specialties:

» Cancer (The Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center), No. 25 » Cardiology & Heart Surgery, No. 13 nationally and top-ranked in Houston » Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, No. 24 » Geriatrics, No. 46 » Neurology & Neurosurgery, No. 33

Of course, I am proud of the U.S. News and World Report recognition, yet I am even more proud of what we are doing at St . Luke’s to make a positive impact on the health and well-being of our friends and neighbors. And we will continue to do so years into the future.

T. Douglas Lawson CEO, St. Luke’s Health

St. Luke’s Health comprises 16 hospitals located in Houston, Bryan/College Station, and East Texas, including the renowned Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center (BSLMC). BSLMC is an academic health center providing quaternary care. We are a non-profit health system guided by our values of Compassion, Inclusion, Integrity, Excellence, and Collaboration.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: To say the 2020-21 school year was challenging for students, teachers, parents and administrators would be the understatement of the year. We have a year of COVID-19 under our belts, but what did all the changes mean for education? Our annual Public Education Edition (see Page 12) gives you updates on how our districts performed and what they are expecting for the 2021-22 school year. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

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FROM JAKE: While COVID-19 isn’t over, some are feeling the smaller waves of the pandemic in the form of a workforce shortage. Bay Area restaurants especially are not immune to the nationwide problem. Read our front-page story to learn more about this challenge. Jake Magee, EDITOR

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BAY AREA EDITION • AUGUST 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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KEMAH BOARDWALK

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COURTESY BLACK ROCK COFFEE BAR

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7 Deep Waters Academy will began classes in August, operating out of Hope Church at 770 Pineloch Drive, Houston. As a University-Model School, the academy oers “the best attributes of private education with the best attributes of home-schooling,” Head of School Amelia Chiara said. Students in kindergarten to seventh grade receive instruction on campus twice a week. The academy aims to partner with Christian parents in the education and formation of their children through hands-on curriculum and small class sizes, Chiara said. 281-694-5582. www.deepwatersacademy.org 8 Code Ninjas opened a new location at 7315 Fairmont Parkway, Pasadena, in late July with a grand opening celebration July 24. The business teaches children ages 7-14 about computer coding while they develop video games. The Deer Park location is owned and operated by local entrepreneurs Sonda and Michael Frament. Michael has more than 20 years of professional experience in computer programming and software development. 281-930-7347. www.codeninjas.com/tx-deerpark 9 Good Buy Liquidation opened at 100 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. 307, Webster, in the NASA 1 Business Park in June. The business is a liquidation store selling new products at 50% or more o Amazon pricing, sta said. www.facebook.com/ goodbuyliquidation RELOCATIONS 10 Bravo Party Shop celebrated its grand opening July 29 at its new location

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NOWOPEN 1 Black Rock Coee Bar opened July 16 at 702 Bay Area Blvd., Webster. The business oers hot and cold specialty coees; noncoee beverages, such as tea and hot chocolate; and blended drinks, such as smoothies. The business has locations in Katy and the west side of Houston. 832-572-3626. www.br.coee 2 Texas Pit Stop BBQ opened in July at 20794 Gulf Freeway, Webster. The restaurant began with the owner, Arnold Garza, winning barbecue cook-o competitions, which drove him to open his own eatery that serves brisket, sh tacos, sausage, pulled pork, smoked chicken and other barbecue staples. The restaurant has two other locations in Galveston and La Marque. 281-810-2222. www.txpitstopbbq.com

3 Divers Down Underwater Adventures at 20801 Gulf Freeway, Ste. 10, Web- ster, held its grand opening July 31. The veteran-owned and -operated training facility boasts over 40 years of profes- sional and commercial diving experience. The business oers diving classes, travel packages and diving equipment for sale. 832-632-1520. www.ddscuba.com 4 Southside Boardshop opened at 19760 Gulf Freeway, Webster, inside Baybrook Square, in early August. Owner Eric Visentin began skating in the late 1980s in his hometown in Seabrook and bought a south Houston skate park in 2007. The business has grown, and the new location is a full-service skate shop that sells apparel and gear and repairs skateboards. The board shop’s Web- ster location is its third. 832-932-5010. www.southsideskatepark.com

5 Submerge Swimwear opened a Kemah Boardwalk storefront in June at 609 Bradford Ave., Ste. 108, Kemah. The boutique oers modern styles of women’s swimwear, apparel, accessories and a limited supply of men’s swim- wear, according to its website. Sta is also available to consult with custom- ers via an online, one-on-one tting room, per the website. 210-896-0625. www.submergeswimwear.com 6 Joe’s Crab Shack opened a boardwalk location at 7 Kemah Boardwalk, Kemah, in late May. The informal chain serves baskets of fried seafood, seafood steam pots and oversized cocktails as well as a new burger bar casual dining concept, per the restaurant’s website. Joe’s is open daily for lunch and dinner with happy hour specials on weekdays. 281-334-9049. www.joescrabshack.com

Licensed and certified assisted living residences for those living with Alzheimer’s disease and other memory disorders.

Memory care r in a home-like setting

• Large secure outdoor space • In person or virtual tours available • Serving Texas since 1997, The Cottages is family-owned and operated

Schedule a tour to receive $200 off monthly rent New residents only. 281-316-4281 • www.alzcottages.com • 400 Landing Blvd, League City, Texas 77573 Facility ID: 010237, 010241&105485 AT CLEAR LAKE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

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Southside Boardshop

Coco Crepes, Waes & Coee

COURTESY CITY OF WEBSTER

COURTESY COCO CREPES, WAFFLES & COFFEE

Vanessa Wyche became director of the Johnson Space Center in May.

at 2951 Marina Bay Drive, Ste. 120, League City. The shop opened in October at Suite 216 while its permanent space was being built. The business sells party and celebration items, including costumes, balloons and decorations. 832-864-2616. www.bravopartyshop.com 11 Coco Crepes, Waes & Coee moved from Suite 200 to Suite 100 at 2471 S. Gulf Freeway, League City, as of early August. Previously, Suite 100 was home to Little Bella Mia with both restau- rants being owned by Manish Maheshwari. Maheshwari has since converted Suite 200 into a community meeting space, which aligns with his original vision for the suites, he said. 281-309-3474. www.facebook.com/cocoleaguecity NAME CHANGES 12 Louetta Automotive, which had a location at 632 N. Egret Bay Blvd., League City, is now Sun Auto Service , according to a May 21 social media post. The business was purchased by Sun Auto Service in 2020 and made the ocial name change in May. Sun Auto Service continues to provide the same services, including oil changes, uid replacement, wheel alignment, brake repair and belt replacement. 281-990-4084. www.sunautoservice.com/louetta IN THE NEWS 13 Space Center Houston , which is at 1601 E. NASA Parkway, Houston, announced in early July that tours of Johnson Space Center’s Mission Control

had returned. Tours of the historic room had been o limits for months at the on- set of COVID-19. Space Center Houston is a museum that allows visitors to learn more about NASA through exhibits. 281-283-4755. www.spacecenter.org 14 William Killinger has been named chief medical ocer at HCA Houston Healthcare Clear Lake , which is at 500 W. Medical Center Blvd., Webster, according to a July 9 news release. The fourth-generation physician had a 27-year career as a cardiothoracic surgeon in North Carolina and served as chief medical ocer at the Medical Center of Trinity in Trinity, Florida. HCA Houston Healthcare Clear Lake is a 532-bed full-service hospital oering inpatient and outpatient medical as well as surgical and specialty services to the Bay Area, including the area’s only pediatric intensive care unit. 281-332-2511. www.hcahoustonhealthcare.com CLOSINGS 15 Little Bella Mia , which is located at 2471 S. Gulf Freeway, Ste. 100, League City, closed in mid-July. Owner Manish Maheshwari, who also ran Coco Crepes, Waes & Coee next door in Suite 200, said it was becoming dicult to run two businesses in the midst of a pandemic and workforce shortage and decided to close the Italian restaurant, of which there are already several in the area. Coco Crepes opened in Suite 100, and Suite 200 has become a meeting space. www.facebook.com/ littlebellamiacasualitaliankitchen

COLLEEN FERGUSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Johnson Space Center , 2101 E. NASA Parkway, Houston, named its rst Black female director over the summer. Vanessa Wyche had been serving as acting director at the center since May, according to a June 30 news release from NASA. She is a 31-year NASA veteran and served as deputy director for nearly three years before stepping into the director role. The South Carolina native and Clemson University alumnus also previously worked as director of the center’s Exploration Integration and Science Directorate and served as a ight manager for multiple space shuttle missions, per the release. As director, Wyche will lead a center that is central to NASA’s human spaceight missions and home to the nation’s astronaut corps, International Space Station mission operations and the Orion Program. “Vanessa is a tenacious leader who has broken down barriers throughout her career,” NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy said in the release. “In the years to come, I’m condent that Houston will continue to lead the way in human spaceight.” Wyche expressed optimism about the future of the space industry in Houston at a Bay Area Houston

Economic Partnership event Aug. 18. Of the more than $5.5 billion the center had in its budget for scal year 2020, more than $2.2 billion was spent in Texas, Wyche said. “To go to the moon, it’s going to take all of us,” she said Aug. 18. “It’s going to take government; it’s going to take academia; it’s going to take industries.” 281-483-0123 www.nasa.gov/centers/johnson

Vanessa Wyche

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Awarded June 2021

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BAY AREA EDITION • AUGUST 2021

Leading Medicine IN CLEAR LAKE

Advanced Care Close to Home Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital provides specialized services, comprehensive emergency care and the most advanced technology and procedures available, ensuring patients receive the highest quality treatment and care — right here in our community.

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HOUSTON METHODIST CLEAR LAKE HOSPITAL

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP

We are proud to offer: • Advanced imaging • Breast Care Center • Cancer Center • Cardiovascular care • Emergency services • Neurology

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP

NASSAU BAY

• Orthopedics and sports medicine

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• Primary care • Urology and

HOUSTON METHODIST PHYSICIAN CLINICS

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urogynecology • Weight loss surgery • Women’s services

houstonmethodist.org/clearlake 281.333.8899

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES El Doradowidening set for completion by spring of 2022 The El Dorado Boulevard widening project between Clear Lake City

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

ONGOING PROJECTS

CHANGE OF PLANS The cost of widening El Dorado Boulevard increased after public feedback spurred design changes. $6.6M $9M Original expected cost Current projected cost

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Boulevard and Horsepen Bayou has changed course after sta with Harris County Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia’s oce took community feedback into consideration, they said. The project, which is being funded equally by the county and the city of Houston, is now expected to cost about $9 million. The initial cost of $6.6 million assumed the presence of a median swale, or ditch, for storm- water detention. Residents overwhelmingly opposed the design due to environ- mental concerns, Garcia said: About 80% were against the swale, per a 2020 survey from Houston Mayor Pro Tem Dave Martin’s oce. “Most of us recognized that there would be a cost change to the project, but we obviously recognized the benets. ... When 80% of your public is giving you feedback, that’s signif- icant,” Garcia said. “Thanks to our process of public engagement and taking the public feedback seriously, it allowed us to come to a better conclusion on this project.” Through the community engage- ment and design processes, ocials learned there was concern over trac ow in regard to the area’s population growth. Trac at the bridge over Horsepen Bayou was particularly an issue, Garcia said. The bridge will be widened as part of the project, ensur- ing trac safety as a result, he said. “The community was indicating

Calder Road widening Calder Road is being widened from Cross Colony Drive to Ervin Street with two travel lanes and a continuous shared center lane for turning left. Pavement and sidewalk were poured in June, but weather has delayed the project’s completion. Timeline: fall 2019-September 2021 Cost: $8.95 million Funding source: city of League City

36% Cost increase

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY PRECINCT 2 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The new lanes of El Dorado Boulevard are closed as construction is underway.

PHOTOS COURTESY MONTAYA MAGEE

UPCOMING PROJECTS

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that this was a choke point for the increased trac that had been grow- ing over the years,” Garcia said. Due to the addition of in-ground detention, the widening project has been split into two phases. Phase 1, which began in May 2020 and is about 70% complete, includes expanding the additional lanes, median and bridge over Horsepen Bayou. Phase 2 will begin when Phase 1 is completed this fall with substan- tial completion expected by April 2022, Garcia said. Phase 2 includes hike and bike trail work and in-ground detention. The trails will be extended to Horsepen

Over 20 years of Dedication. Integrity. Passion. Service. Consistency. Whether you are buying or selling, we look forward to assisting you with every step of the process. Bayou, and 5 miles of trails works will be completed in conjuncture with the El Dorado widening, Garcia said. This feeds into Precinct 2’s goal to create a broader network of hike and bike trails, he added. Delays have not been signicant, and crews intend to complete the project on time barring any extreme weather, Precinct 2 ocials said. When complete, El Dorado will have four 12-foot lanes, two in each direction. Modifying the project to create a traditional sewer system will protect native trees as well as provide necessary underground detention and drainage, Garcia said.

Phase 2 Turner and Butler reconstruction

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Turner to Sedona Drive. Timeline: July 2022-TBD Cost: $5.36 million Funding source: city of League City Contractors this summer nished wid- ening Turner Street from Calder Road to Butler Road and Butler from Turner to League City Parkway, but workers next year will reconstruct Turner from Butler to Hobbs Road and Butler from

Kimberly Harding, Broker/Owner 281-554-7653 Kimberly@KimberlyHarding.com

2490 Calder Dr, League City, TX 77573 | www.TheKimberlyHardingGroup.com

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BAY AREA EDITION • AUGUST 2021

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from League City & Clear Creek ISD

Council balks at price of sports park

Clear Creek ISD discusses paying for murals, graphics

NUMBER TOKNOW $400,000 is the cost for a contract to create murals in Clear Creek ISD. A maximum of $50,000 in property tax dollars could be spent on the contract, and the rest would be fundraised.

BY JAKE MAGEE

of money to add nine [baseball and softball] fields and two soccer fields,” Council Member Nick Long said. “I just think it’s a nonstarter at this price tag.” Coleman said a lot of the cost is due to detention, and about $1 million of the price is set aside to haul off dirt from the development. Hopefully, TBG Partners can reduce the estimated price as design is detailed, he said. City Council directed TBG Partners to return with a cheaper plan with fewer amenities. Council Member Chad Tressler said the city would love to have Bay Colony Park as planned but cannot afford it.

LEAGUE CITY A proposed sports park on League City’s west side will not move forward as originally planned after City Council’s direc- tion Aug. 10. Blake Coleman with TBG Part- ners, a firm the city hired to design the incoming Bay Colony Park, presented to City Council the firm’s plan for the site, which totals an estimated $38 million. The 109-acre parcel on the southwest corner of Calder Road and Ervin Street would include five softball fields, four baseball fields, two international-sized soccer fields on which football could also be played, six tennis courts, a disc golf course, a playground, a pavilion, bathrooms, a concession stand and detention ponds, Coleman said. City Council members said they were surprised to see such a high price tag for the limited number of sports fields. “That is an incredible amount

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

CLEAR CREEK ISD Trustees and district leaders at Clear Creek ISD discussed July 26 awarding a contract worth $400,000 for murals and graphics services. About $50,000 in funds not attached to a bond could be spent on the murals, but this money would not be spent if the funds are not present, said Alice Benzaia, CCISD director of business services and financial planning. The purchasing of the services could have been phrased in a more reader-friendly manner, Trustee Scott Bowen said during the meeting. Bowen felt the agenda item was written to make it look like all $400,000 is coming from taxpayers, which he said would be “out of control.” “This was a very controversial purchase item to begin with,” he

said, asking how much of the con- tract would be covered by volunteer organizations and how much would be coming from the school’s general fund. “I wish there were a more clear way we could communicate through these agenda items.” The estimated cost for the project is based on previous expenditures with similar projects, district leaders said. A majority of the funds would likely be raised by volunteer orga- nizations, although officials do not have a picture of what fundraising will look like yet. Trustee Laura DuPont noted many variables affect booster clubs and other fundraisers, making this difficult to assess on the administrative end.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY HIGHLIGHT AUG. 10 League City City Council approved a new planned unit development, TownHarbour Estates, along Lakeside Drive that will include a marina, a canal and homes. Houston City Council meets 9 a.m. Sept. 1, 8, 15 and 22 at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. MEETINGSWE COVER Clear Creek ISD board of trustees meets 6 p.m. Sept. 13 at 2425 E. Main St., League City. Watch online at www.ccisd.net/boardmeeting. League City City Council meets 6 p.m. Sept. 14 at 400 W. Walker St., League City. Meetings are streamed at www.facebook.com/ leaguecitytexas. QUOTEOFNOTE “I JUST THINK IT’S ANONSTARTERAT THIS PRICE TAG.” NICK LONG, LEAGUE CITY CITY COUNCIL MEMBER, ON CREATING BAY COLONY PARK

League City tax rate to drop at least $0.049

DROPPING RATE After League City City Council’s vote Aug. 10, the fiscal year 2021-22 property tax rate will be at least $0.049 less than the existing rate. FY 2020-21 property tax rate $0.515 FY 2021-22 no-new-revenue rate $0.475526 FY 2021-22 maximum rate $0.465526

BY JAKE MAGEE

proposed a rate of $0.435526—$0.04 lower than the city’s recommenda- tion. Long mentioned the FY 2021-22 budget includes a reserve fund of 116 days, which is six days more than League City’s policy calls for and a full 26 days more than required by state law. That six extra days of reserve funds equates to nearly $1.3 million, which is sitting in a checking account earn- ing no interest. That money should either be removed from the budget to lower the tax rate or be used to pay down debt, Long said. Budget Director Angie Steelman said whatever the council agreed to be the proposed rate could be lowered by the September vote but could not be raised. Mayor Pat Hallisey said if it were up to him, he would lower the tax rate a full $0.10 to $0.375526. The commu- nity needs to drill down on its budget priorities, Hallisey said. “We spend on whims,” he said. “We gotta find some common ground.”

LEAGUE CITY The property tax rate for League City residents will drop at least $0.049 after League City City Council’s vote Aug. 10. By law, City Council had to come to a consensus on a proposed tax rate for fiscal year 2021-22. This would allow the city to post formal notice before the true property tax rate is voted on and approved in September. Staff proposed the rate at $0.475526 per $100 valuation, which is the no-new-revenue rate and $0.039 lower than the existing tax rate of $0.515. The no-new-revenue rate is the rate at which the city would bring in no new property tax revenue in FY 2021-22 compared to the existing fiscal year. Many council members were not satisfied with passing the new-no-revenue rate; with new developments coming to the city and property values rising, they wanted

SOURCE: LEAGUE CITY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Council Member Hank Dugie made a motion for a tax rate of $0.465526, which is $0.01 lower than the city’s proposed rate. Long said by cutting a penny from the no-new-revenue rate knowing the six days of reserves can cover that, council and staff can debate where to trim to make the rate work. The vote passed on a proposed maximum rate of $0.465526 with Hallisey and Millican opposed.

the rate lowered even further. Council Member Nick Long

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BAY AREA EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DISTRICT DATA

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

CLEAR CREEK ISD

45 campuses

40,737 students

Enrollment at the 45-campus Clear Creek ISD has uctuated between approximately 40,700 and 42,400 students from 2018-19 to present. About one in every four students is economically disadvantaged.

2,543 teachers

1948 year founded

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, CLEAR CREEK ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Student enrollment *PROJECTED

202021 stang, salaries and substitutes

Total number of teachers*

Starting teacher salary

Percent change from 2018-19

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22*

2,543

$58,000

42,388

42,205

41,066

Superintendent salary

Substitute daily pay**

-3.48%

$325,678

$70$100

40,737

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS. **RANGES VARY BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND OTHER FACTORS

202021 student statistics

Revenue sources

*REPRESENTS OTHER RESOURCES AND NONOPERATING REVENUES

Economically disadvantaged students 27.9%

English learners 11%

Special education students

2017 18

2018 19

2019 20

2020 21

12.4%

$335.1 MILLION TOTAL REVENUE:

$346.6 MILLION TOTAL REVENUE:

$361.3 MILLION TOTAL REVENUE:

$370.5 MILLION TOTAL REVENUE:

$236.8 million LOCAL $96.6 million STATE

$235.4 million LOCAL $114.9 million STATE $6.7 million FEDERAL $4.3 million OTHER*

$240.4 million LOCAL $112.9 million STATE

$224.7 million LOCAL $103 million STATE

Statewide

60.19% 20.64%

11.26%

$5.1 million FEDERAL $2.3 million OTHER*

$5.7 million FEDERAL $7.5 million OTHER*

$7 million FEDERAL

$10.2 million OTHER*

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

STAAR Clear Creek ISDSTAAR scores dip from 2019 to 2021, mirroring state trends

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

STAAR TRACK

Clear Creek ISD is analyzing State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness performance to address learning gaps in the hopes that all students will succeed in a post-pandemic educational landscape.

Spring 2019 Spring 2021 Percentage point change

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

average on the majority of the STAAR end-of-course exams, per CCISD’s June 30 statement. From 2019 to 2021, there were minimal increases or slight decreases in the percentage of CCISD secondary students who did not meet expectations in U.S. History, English I and English II; for biology and algebra, 3%-6%more students did not meet expectations this spring than in 2019. The district is analyzing student performance and developing instructional supports to address any learning gaps so all students can succeed in a post-pandemic educa- tional landscape, according to the Texas ocials said the pandemic had signicant eects on students, which led to a noticeable decline in STAAR performance. Ocials gave two key takeaways at a June 28 press conference: STAAR math scores fared signicantly worse than reading this year, and in-person students and districts performed much better than remote students and districts. “The performance decline is noticeable,” Texas Education Agency Commissioner Mike Morath said. Statewide STAAR participation was about 87% this spring compared to 96% in a normal year, according to Morath. The 2020-21 school year was full of unexpected turns for teachers and students, and the eects of CCISD statement. Statewide results coronavirus on “what school means and what school is” are far-reaching, Morath said. During the press conference, he

Percentage of students that did not meet expectations:

State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness results from this year’s spring administration released June 28 showed Clear Creek ISD students experienced a dip in perfor- mance compared to spring 2019—the last time the exams were adminis- tered—due to learning disruptions from COVID-19. This is consistent with statewide trends. Superintendent Eric Williams said in a June 30 statement to Community Impact Newspaper these scores reect hard work, dedication to students and a commitment to make the most of a dicult situation. “We can be proud of what our students accomplished with the support of our educators, parents and guardians,” Williams said. “They also indicate the work we have ahead of us in meeting the individual needs of our students as we prepare to start a new school year that will look a lot more like a prepandemic school year than the most recent school year.” State average results this year showed a 4% decrease in students reading at or above grade level and a 15% decline in students doing math at or above grade level compared to 2019. CCISD students were on par with that trend for reading, with up to 9% more students reading below grade level between grades three and eight; there was an 8%-18% increase in mathematics students performing below grade level, with more signicant gaps in seventh- and eighth-grade test takers. Students scored above the Texas

Math

19%

+10

29%

Reading

18%

+4

22%

Math

13%

+18

31%

Reading

15%

+4

19%

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, DATA INTERACTION FOR TEXAS STUDENT ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

standards aside from STAAR perfor- mance, former CCISD board member Page Rander and Robert Bayard, deputy superintendent of curriculum and instruction, emphasized at a May 10 board workshop. “If there’s one thing that sets Clear Creek ISD apart frommany other districts, it is the opportunities for students. They’re multifaceted,” Bayard said as district leaders discussed takeaways from CCISD’s 2019-20 Community Based Account- ability Report. “We’re not just a worksheet-driven district. The fact that kids have opportunities in high school that many kids don’t even get until they’re juniors and seniors in college is amazing.” Matt Stephens contributed to this report.

emphasized the importance of local educators and parents developing action plans to support student liter- acy and numeracy moving forward. Data from the TEA shows the smallest performance declines were in districts where 76%-100% of students were learning in the tradi- tional classroom setting as opposed to virtually. As of March, more than 80% of CCISD students were learn- ing in-person, Community Impact Newspaper previously reported. “What we know now with certainty is that the decision in Texas to prioritize in-person instruction was critical,” Morath said. Residents can see more of the preliminary results data at http://txreports.emetric.net. CCISD measures itself by various

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INSIDE INFORMATION

In Texas’ 86th Legislature in 2019, lawmakers approved House Bill 3, a comprehensive school nance reform that went into eect Sept. 1, 2019. Among HB 3’s changes was a compression on property tax rates: If property values rise statewide or locally, districts must reduce their tax rate to help ease the burden on local property owners. EXPLAINING SCHOOL FINANCES

STATEWIDE PROPERTY TAX CALCULATIONS

Local property taxes are composed of an interest and sinking tax rate, or I&S, and a maintenance and operations rate, or M&O.

The I&S is used for a district’s debt service on voter- approved bonds for facilities.

The M&O includes districts’ basic level of funding and its enrichment fund, which are used for regular school operations, such as teacher salaries.

District’s total property tax rate

+

=

COMPILED BY SAVANNAH KUCHAR

SOURCES: RAISE YOUR HAND TEXAS, EVERY TEXAN, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, LEGISLATIVE BUDGET BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMPONENTS OF HOUSE BILL 3

M&0 property tax rates (per $100 valuation), scal year 2021-22

In its rst two years, HB 3 invested $11.5 billion into public school nance reform.

$1.0671 Statewide maximum for most districts with voter approval $1.0354 Statewide maximum without voter approval

$5 billion went to property tax relief by subsidizing decreases in local revenue following statewide compressions on local districts’ property tax rates.

If statewide property value growth exceeds 2.5% in a year, the tax rate for districts will be compressed. If a district’s growth is higher than the state’s growth, the district’s rate will be furthered compressed. Districts can add a maximum of roughly $0.13 to their compressed rate before seeking voter approval.

$6.5 billion was used to bolster school funding by increasing the basic allotment, in turn raising the majority of districts’ entitlements. A portion of this increase was specically meant for raising teachers’ and other sta’s salaries.

$ 11.5 B total invested

$0.8971 Statewide compressed rate

$0.8074 Statewide minimum

STATE VS. LOCAL SHARE

Texas’ public school system is funded largely by state aid and local property tax revenue. Prior to HB 3, the local share grew as property values increased statewide, but with the legislation, the state now takes on a larger portion year over year.

$60B $50B $40B $30B $20B $10B $0

CLEAR CREEK ISD PROPERTY TAX RATES

Clear Creek ISD’s maintenance and operations tax rate and interest and sinking tax rate were both mostly at from at least the 2012-13 school year until House Bill 3 took eect in 2019-20, lowering the M&O rate.

*2019 IS ESTIMATED, WHILE 2020 AND 2021 IS PROJECTED. State share Local share

M&O rate I&S rate HB 3

$0 $0.20 $0.40 $0.60 $0.80 $1.00 $1.20

“IT’SREALLYNOTPROPERTY TAXRELIEF; IT’STAXRATE COMPRESSION. THESTATE JUSTKEEPSBUYINGDOWN THATTAXRATE, ANDTHE TAXPAYERENDSUPPAYINGON AVERAGEABOUTTHESAME IN TAXESTHATTHEYHAVEBEEN.” BOB POPINSKI, DIRECTOR OF POLICY AT RAISE YOUR HAND TEXAS

$1.04

COVID19'S EFFECT ON SCHOOL FUNDING

$0.94

Most districts were held harmless by the state for any enrollment changes during the pandemic, so funding entitlements were not negatively aected by attendance changes. Federal funding gave three rounds of aid to address pandemic-related disruptions. The packages amounted to $19.2 billion , of which:

$0.32

$0.33

$ 15.14 B will be distributed back out to districts.

$ 1.91 B will be reserved by the state for statewide programs.

$ 2.15 B was used by the state for the hold-harmless program.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HIGHER EDUCATION House Bill 3348 spurs growth at local community colleges

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Alvin Community College, College of the Mainland and San Jacinto College plan to expand baccalaureate degree oerings in the coming years after the passage of House Bill 3348, which allows them to oer up to ve bachelor’s degree programs. NEWHORIZONS

ALVIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

recovery at an ecient cost. Bills such as HB 3348 help colleges provide more robust oerings and work toward having equality of opportunity in postsecondary education, said state Rep. Mayes Middleton, RWallisville. “It’s these kinds of bills that I think build a better future for Texas,” said Middleton, who was a bill sponsor. COM oers the third-lowest tuition in the state for community colleges, President Warren Nichols said. Key decision-makers review labor market data each year to ensure program oerings empower graduates to enter the workforce with skills that will be in demand, college leaders said. Community colleges’ workforce development programs help ensure learners remain in the Bay Area, lawmakers and college leaders said. Earning a four-year degree at a private university outside the Greater Houston area can result in the accu- mulation of signicant student debt, making higher education unattain- able for some. COM cannot oer another bache- lor’s program until at least six months after the rst one begins, Fliger said. The college is working with its partners to develop plans for the other four bachelor’s programs. “We welcome and encourage the conversations with our sister univer- sities to let us provide the opportu- nity for our students, regardless of what their career aspirations are, to come here [to COM] to continue that education,” Nichols said.

• Expanded agreement with University of Houston-Clear Lake at Pearland in 2021 to streamline the process from two-year registered nurse degree at ACC degree to four-year BSN at UHCL • In addition to its associate degree programs, the college oers three types of certicates: programs less than one year, one-year programs and enhanced skills programs. • College ocials are evaluating the possibility of oering four-year degrees as part of the upcoming ve-year strategic plan, which is in development. “We feel that HB 3348 has given us an opportunity to oer bachelor’s degrees in the future.” JOHN TOMPKINS, COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR AT ALVIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

The signing of House Bill 3348 into law during the 87th Texas Legislature allows for local community colleges, such as College of the Mainland, to oer up to ve bachelor’s degree pro- grams with their two-year oerings. COM is among several local colleges planning to expand program- ming. Ocials at San Jacinto College and Alvin Community College said they are assessing workforce needs and strategic plans to determine how they will move forward with future four-year degree oerings. “We feel that HB 3348 has given us an opportunity to oer bachelor’s degrees in the future,” said John Tompkins, communications coordi- nator at Alvin Community College. The rst baccalaureate degree COM is oering will be in nursing. The rst 20 students in the cohort will begin this fall, and the second cohort will be admitted, tentatively, in the fall 2022 semester. “We are a responsive college,” COM Vice President for Instruction Jerry Fliger said. “All of our programs directly serve the workforce needs of our community.” COM leadership and local lawmak- ers spoke about the program expan- sions July 1 inside of the new science, technology, engineering, arts and math building, which was unveiled April 30. State Sen. Larry Taylor, RFriendswood, called HB 3348 “a godsend for students today,” adding community colleges will lead the state into post-pandemic economic

COLLEGE OF THEMAINLAND

• Will welcome rst BSN cohort in fall 2021 • Plans are being developed for four more bachelor’s degree programs. • The college can begin oering additional four-year programs a minimum of six months after the rst one begins. “We are a responsive college. … All of our programs directly serve the workforce needs of our community.” JERRY FLIGER, COLLEGE OF THE MAINLAND’S VICE PRESIDENT FOR INSTRUCTION

SAN JACINTO COLLEGE

• Began oering a Bachelor of Science in nursing program in fall 2020 • Oering a BSN was made possible during the 85th legislative session through the passage of Senate Bill 2118, which revised and expanded requirements for a junior college seeking to oer four-year degree programs. • The bill set out further requirements specically applicable to a junior college seeking to oer a BSN program. “We are looking at additional bachelor programs that will mainly be workforce driven, so we are working with industry [partners] to identify what those programs are.” AMANDA FENWICK, VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS AT SAN JACINTO COLLEGE

SOURCES: ALVIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE, COLLEGE OF THE MAINLAND, SAN JACINTO COLLEGE, TEXAS LEGISLATURECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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