Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition | Aug. 2021

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 4  AUG. 26SEPT.22, 2021

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Stang shortages create challenges for local businesses

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P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Students arrive for the rst day of school Aug. 18 at Liberty Elementary School in Keller ISD. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI

The good news for Kevin McNamara is that business is picking up at the two Wise Guys Pizzeria locations he co-owns. “We’re denitely seeing demand increase to over 2019 numbers, which is great,” McNamara said. The not so good news? Stang up to fully meet that increased demand has been dicult, McNamara said, and the end of the summer will only com- pound the situation. “We’re losing several employees going o to college,” he said, noting he anticipates 12 departures between the restaurants in Roanoke and Grapevine. CONTINUED ON 20

Federal funds to help local school districts after a year of nancial uncertainty Giving schools a helping hand

According to an estimation by the Texas Workforce Commission, in June, for every 10 local job openings there were 8.2 unemployed workers.

BY KIRA LOVELL & STEVEN RYZEWSKI

intervention led both districts to adopt decit budgets for the 2021-22 school year, which will be oset by federal funds being doled out to districts for exactly that purpose. Both districts adopted budgets in June. Keller ISD’s budget outlines a decit of more than $17 million, CONTINUED ON 18

Keller ISD and Northwest ISD are boosting spending to hire teachers, tutors and counselors as well as funding other strategies to help oset learning loss and other costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Increased spending in areas such as stang and

SEE LOCALUNEMPLOYMENT RATES INSIDE

PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION 2021

DISTRICT DATA

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CAMPUS DEEP DIVE

IMPACTS

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BUSINESS FEATURE

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2021

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMANA: Just like that, the school year is upon us. Inside you will nd our annual Public Education Edition (see Pages 11-19). In it, we look at how federal funding is being allocated by Keller ISD and Northwest ISD, in order to address things like employee pay raises and how to bridge the gap caused by the learning loss that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic. I also want to take this time to wish all educators, students and parents a great school year! Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

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FROMSTEVEN: In addition to our Public Education Edition this month, we took a deeper look into the hiring challenges being faced locally—not just by our mom-and-pop small businesses, but by local government entities, as well. We hope you’ll give that article a read (see Pages 20-21) and that it’ll help paint a bigger picture of some of the implications for our local economy. Steven Ryzewski, EDITOR

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding 1171

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Tornado Terry’s Family Amusement Center

Selfie WLRD Fort Worth

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COURTESY TORNADO TERRY’S FAMILY AMUSEMENT CENTER

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MadiJaks

Super Fort Wars

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COMING SOON 6 Texas Oncology broke ground in July on a new cancer care center at 9750 Hillwood Parkway at Alliance Town Center. Patients and care teams located at Texas Oncology-Keller will move to the Alliance location when it opens in 2022. The new facility will provide comprehen- sive cancer care as well as breast cancer procedures and services offered by Texas Breast Specialists. 817-359-9000. www.texasoncology.com 7 Spec’s Wine, Spirits & Finer Foods will open its location in early 2022—if not sooner—at 100 Chandler Road, Keller, according to a post by the City of Keller Government Facebook page. Spec’s offers an assortment of wine, spirits, beer, cheese and other foods, according to the company’s website. 888-526-8787. www.specsonline.com 8 Suck It Jerky and Pickles , which sells jerky, pickles and hot sauce made without preservatives or sugar, will open its first permanent location in early September at

Ridge Parkway, Fort Worth. The center focuses on hands-on learning and prob- lem-solving activities for children up to 5 years old. 817-306-2171. www.thelearningexperience.com 4 Filipino restaurant and grocery store Tindahan ni Kuya held a grand opening and ribbon cutting Aug. 3 at 801 S. Main St., Ste. 101, Keller. The restaurant serves authentic dishes, including desserts such as shaved ice halo-halo. The grocery store offers canned goods and packaged snacks as well as other Filipino groceries and products. 682-593-5568. www.tindahannikuya.store 5 SelfieWLRD Fort Worth opened July 30 in Alliance Town Center, 9409 Sage Meadow Trail, Fort Worth. The do-it-yourself photography studio features 18 interactive installations, in- cluding a ‘50s diner and a sun room with swings as well as a rentable party room. 817-741-9787. www.selfiewrldfw.com

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

NOWOPEN 1 Bazooka Charlie’s Barber Co. opened its new location in Keller at 1400 Keller Parkway, Ste. 300, on Aug. 3. The company has a location in Roanoke by the same name that originally opened in 2018 as Griff’s Ace Grooming. It provides haircuts for adults and kids with ameni- ties such as free beverages and lounge seating in the waiting area. Subscription options are available, offering unlimited haircuts for a monthly fee. 817-935-0123. www.bazookacharlies.com 820

2 The Market at Roanoke is a new co- operative retail space that opened Aug. 1 and is located at 304 N. Oak St. The col- lective of shops features more than 15 different vendors and includes children’s clothing, women’s clothing, accessories, home decor, gourmet kitchen items, a pet boutique and more. There is also a sister market located in Fort Worth. www.themarketatridglea.com/ the-market-at-roanoke 3 The Learning Experience opened a new early childhood educational and care center in July at 9056 Tehama

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK, BAILEY LEWIS & STEVEN RYZEWSKI COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL, SANDRA S DEK, BAILEY LEWIS & STEV N RYZEWSKI

Keller Center Stage was approved in 2020 and recently broke ground.

COURTESY REALTY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

121 Olive St., Keller. The jerky shop got its start selling products at the Keller Farmers Market and online. Owner and curator Scott Spielman said he prides himself on creating products with ingredients that customers can read and pronounce. 817-296-4161. www.suckitjerkyandpickles.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 Tornado Terry’s Family Amusement Center celebrated its 30th anniversa- ry as a local icon Aug. 1. The arcade at 4530 Keller Hicks Road, Fort Worth, hosts an all-you-can-play zone featuring classic and new arcade games for a flat admission fee as well as tokened games offering tickets that can be exchanged for prizes. Party packages are also available. 817-431-6121. www.tornadoterrys.com 10 MadiJaks , a women’s boutique locat- ed at 400 S. Oak St., Ste. 110, in down- town Roanoke, celebrated its one-year an- niversary Aug. 1. The retail location offers a variety of clothing, shoes, jewelry and accessories for shoppers. 817-965-0648. www.facebook.com/madijaksroanoke 11 Premium custom automotive and restoration shop StreetMod Designs celebrated its one-year anniversary at 12815 Harmon Road, Ste. 495, in Fort Worth on Aug. 3. The family-owned shop is run by husband-wife team David and Ashley Knapp. 682-250-6182. www.streetmoddesigns.com 12 Super Fort Wars opened its doors one year ago in July, offering Keller and Fort Worth-area residents the ultimate fort-building and Nerf war experience. Located at 10379 Alta Vista Road, FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Developers Realty Capital Management and Greystar broke ground in July on a 38-acre mixed-use development called Keller Center Stage , located at the intersection of US 377 and Mount Gilead Road. The rst phase of the project will include 24,000 square feet of commercial space, a community lawn and Greystar’s The Lyric at Keller Center Stage multifamily community. The community lawn and commercial buildings are expected to be complete in the third quarter of 2022. The rst

building at The Lyric should be move-in ready by the fourth quarter of 2022. www.kellercenterstage.com

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Ste. 211, the business has events for all ages and can host birthday parties, among other functions. All events are by appointment, which can be scheduled at the website. 972-841-6219. www.superfortwars.com RENOVATIONS 13 Walmart Supercenter at 5336 Golden Triangle Blvd., Fort Worth, recently underwent renovations and held a grand reopening Aug. 6. Improvements include safety and time-saving innovations, updated signage, an expanded pickup and delivery area, and updates to the Vision Center. 817-898-6122. www.walmart.com/ store/2834-fort-worth-tx CLOSINGS 14 Roscoe’s Smokehouse Keller closed its doors at 134 S. Main St., Keller, for the final time Aug. 15. Roscoe’s Smokehouse Keller was one of two locations owned by Blair Pearce and Scott Noojin, according to the restaurant’s webpage, and special- ized in Texas-style barbecue and barbe- cue-inspired dishes. The other location in Burleson remains open. 682-593-7799. www.roscoessmokehouse.com 15 Out On A Limb Boutique is closing at the end of August. Owner Candace Schoepflin announced the closure on Facebook Aug. 14, saying that she is mov- ing out of the metroplex. The boutique is located at 201 Town Center Lane, Ste. 1115, Keller, and sold eye-catching fash- ion apparel along with gifts and other items. 817-993-9127. www.myoutonalimb.com

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2021

TODO LIST

August & September events

COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL, STEVEN RYZEWSKI & SANDRA SADEK

AUGUST 28 & EVERY SATURDAY UNTIL SEPT. 25 SHOP FOR LOCAL PRODUCE AT THE ROANOKE FARMERSMARKET The Roanoke Farmers Market takes place at Roanoke City Hall Plaza throughout the spring and summer and features small and local businesses. The market will also include events like morning yoga, live music and food trucks on most Saturdays. 8 a.m.-noon. Free (admission). 500 S. Oak St., Roanoke. 817-491-2411. www.roanoketexas.com/calendar SEPTEMBER 11 DONATE BLOODAT KELLER PUBLIC LIBRARY The Carter BloodCare team will be at the Keller Public Library to collect blood donations for people in the community in need. People age 16 and up can donate, and minors need parental consent. Pre-registration for a specic time slot is strongly encouraged. Noon-5 p.m. Free. 640 Johnson Road, Keller. 817-743-4800. bit.ly/KPLGiveBlood 12 SUPPORT A CAUSE AT SKY CREEK RANCH GOLF CLUB The First United Methodist Church of

Hurst will host a golf scramble to support community assistance agency Mission Central. Cash and door prizes will be awarded throughout the round, and the event will end with an awards dinner. Registration deadline is Sept. 6. 2 p.m. (shotgun start). $150 (adult golfer), $75 ( junior golfer), $175 (walk-up fee at event). 600 Promontory Drive, Keller. 817-282-7384. www.fumchurst.org 16 ENJOY A BREW, LEARN ABOUT KELLER’S BUDGET Keller Mayor Armin Mizani will be hosting a “Budget & Brews” session. Residents can get a preview of the city’s scal year 2021-22 budget City Council will vote on the following week and ask Mizani and nance director Aaron Rector questions— all while enjoying the oerings at What’s On Tap with owner Brad Trapnell. 6 p.m. Free (admission). 201 Town Center Lane, Ste. 1107, Keller. 817-743-4000. www.cityoeller.com 16 CRAFTWITHWINE BOTTLES AT TWO BROTHERSWINERY Two Brothers Winery is oering a class to give new purpose to an empty wine bottle. Before you recycle the glass bottle, this class will show attendees ways to repurpose it as something completely dierent. Taught by Karen

SEPT. 18

RAISE FUNDSWHILE DRIVING AROUNDA RACE TRACK TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

The Laps for Charity event allows individuals to drive their personal vehicle around the track at the Texas Motor Speedway to benet children through Speedway Children’s Charities. Drivers must be at least 18 years old and sign a waiver. General admission begins at 6 p.m. for three laps. $200 (Exclusive VIP Laps), $40 (general admission). 3545 Lone Star Circle, Fort Worth. 817-215-8564. www.speedwaycharities.org/events/ texas/laps-for-charity (Courtesy Speedway Children’s Charities)

18 SHARE SONGSWITH THE KELLER FOLKMUSIC SOCIETY The Keller Folk Music Society meets on the third Saturday every month and invites professional and nonprofessional musicians to share songs, stories and talents. 1 p.m. Free. Keller Public Library, 640 Johnson Road, Keller. 817-743-4800. www.meetup.com/ kellerfolkmusicsociety

Clark, from Legacy at Bear Creek, the class will include instruction and materials needed for the craft—which attendees get to take home—as well as a glass of wine and a snack. Additional wine and food items will be available for purchase. 6-8 p.m. $25. 110 Lamar St., Keller. 817-541-9463. www.twobrotherswinery.com

Find more or submit Keller, Roanoke, or Northeast Fort Worth events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Commissioners Court to put bond for transportation projects on ballot

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK & STEVEN RYZEWSKI

ONGOING PROJECTS

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A unanimous vote Aug. 10 by the Tarrant County Commissioners Court called for a bond election for two propositions that will be placed on the ballot for the Nov. 2 election. Proposition A is for the issuance of $400 million in general obligation bonds for transportation projects. A second proposition will focus on $116 million in general obligation bonds for a new facility for the county’s criminal district attorney oce. The bonds proposed for Proposi- tion A will be described on the ballot as being for “purchasing, construct- ing, reconstructing, renovating, reha- bilitating, improving and maintaining streets, roads, highways and bridges within Tarrant County, including city, county and state streets; roads; high- ways and bridges; and the imposition of a tax sucient to pay the principal

of and interest on the bonds.” Cities and public agencies in Tarrant County submitted projects previously. Bonds approved by the voters in November will be allowed to fund up to half the cost of a selected municipal project and, of the $400 million being proposed, $200 million is tentatively to be allocated for the projects submit- ted by municipalities. An evaluation committee began meeting in May to rank the projects. It presented its rankings to the Commissioners Court on Aug. 3, and they were recorded for further consideration. Projects for Keller and Fort Worth were among the projects recommended for funding by the court. Tarrant County voters last approved a transportation bond in 2006 for a total of $200 million.

TIMBERLA

KELLER HICKS RD.

Lane reopening The U-turn lanes at the intersection of SH 170 and US 377 are expected to reopen this fall. Timeline: completion by fall 2021 Cost: $100 million for entire project Funding sources: public and private

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Ramp closure Starting Aug. 20, the o-ramp from southbound I-35W to Keller Hicks Road will be closed o as part of TxDOT’s I-35W/North Tarrant Express project, which began in 2020. Trac will be redirected to a temporary o-ramp at Golden Triangle Blvd. This will be a long-term closure. Timeline: TBD Cost: $1.6 billion for the entire project Funding sources: public and private

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Big Bear sewer expansion continues The city of Keller continues its expan- sion of the Big Bear sewer line along Keller Parkway to add capacity. Trac ow and sewer services will not be impacted. Timeline: August - December Cost: $525,474 Funding source: city of Keller

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 17. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KRNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News from Keller, Fort Worth & Denton County

COMPILED BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI & VALERIE WIGGLESWORTH

LOCAL HIGHLIGHTS FORTWORTH A resolution to require face coverings inside city buildings was voted down 5-4 by Fort Worth City Council on Aug. 17. Mayor Mattie Parker joined council members Cary Moon, Leonard Firestone, Gyna Bivens and Michael D. Crain in rejecting the proposal. “Any time you say something is mandatory and, at the bottom of it, say it’s not enforceable, it’s incredibly confusing, and you are putting the onus on city sta,” Parker said. DENTON COUNTY County commissioners are proposing a budget of nearly $336.91 million for scal year 2021-22, which amounts to a 5.66% increase over the current year. As part of that budget, commissioners also are proposing a property tax rate of $0.233086 per $100 valuation. The scal year 2020-21 rate is $0.224985. Using the average home value in Denton County of $359,651, the proposed tax rate would increase tax bills by $29.14 per year, according to the county. Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 14, 21, 28 www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 7, 21 www.cityoeller.com Roanoke City Council Meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 14, 28 www.roanoketexas.com Tarrant County Commissioners Court Meets at 10 a.m. Aug. 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28 www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets at 7 p.m. Sept. 27 www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 13, 27 www.nisdtx.org MEETINGSWE COVER

A DUAL APPROACH

As the tax rate in the city of Keller has trended down since scal year 2013-14, the homestead exemption has done the opposite, functioning as another tool for the city to lower tax bills.

$0.45

30%

$0.30

20%

$0.15

10% 0%

0

2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22

SOURCE: CITY OF KELLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City Council gives approval to proposed tax rate

KELLER City Council approved a proposed tax rate of $0.395 per $100 valuation for scal year 2021-22, matching the rate for scal year 2020-21. The rate was proposed Aug. 17 during a presentation by Aaron Rector, the city’s director of adminis- trative services and nance. Rector explained that the rate,

Juneteenth nowa city holiday in FortWorth FORTWORTH City Council voted unanimously Aug. 10 to make June- teenth a paid city holiday. Juneteenth honors June 19, 1865, when Union Gen. Gordon Granger came to Galveston to announce the liberation of enslaved people in Texas—more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Following the vote by City Council, June 19 will be a paid municipal holiday in Fort Worth for its roughly 7,000 city employees. Civic leader Opal Lee, who has promoted the importance of the holiday for a long time, was in attendance for the vote. homeowner for the scal year. “We’re doing ocial tax relief this year,” Rector said. The rate also falls below the no-new-revenue rate and therefore will not require a public hearing. The proposed rate can be ratied when City Council approves the FY 2021-22 budget, planned for Sept. 21.

when paired with the city’s increased homestead exemption to 20% from 14%, will amount to an average tax bill of $1,374.20 for the average taxable home in Keller—valued at $347,898. The average tax bill with the 14% homestead exemption in FY 2020-21 was $1,389.68, making for an average savings of $15.48 per

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FUTURE PARK DEVELOPMENT AREA

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Plans approved for park development KELLER City Council approved measures July 20 that will invest nearly $3 million in Overton Ridge Park in the city’s northern area. The projects cover the 12 a pavilion, shaded seating areas and parking. They will also include

trails that connect with existing trails on the park’s west side. The playground will be unique in that it will be the city’s rst fully inclusive playground, intentionally designed for children of all physical abilities.

undeveloped acres of the existing park at a planned cost of nearly $2.97 million. The additions will include a playground, restrooms,

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DISTRICT DATA

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KELLER ISD

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29 campuses

26,277 students 4 high schools

Keller ISD’s student population has been on the rise in the years prior to COVID-19. Its 2019 voter-approved bond is in progress as the district looks to make improvements throughout the campuses to address student needs.

2,508.66 teachers*

1,728.82 teachers*

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS. SOURCES: KELLER ISD, NORTHWEST ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Student enrollment *PROJECTED

Stang, salaries and substitutes

Total districtwide personnel*

Total number of support sta*

Average teacher salary

Average support sta salary

Percent change from 2018-19

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

2021-22*

36,934

36,255

36,248

35,799

-3.07%

26,277

25,976

25,092

24,120

+8.94%

*TOTAL IS THE FULLTIME EQUIVALENT AND MAY INCLUDE PARTTIME POSITIONS.

202021 student statistics Economically disadvantaged students 23.3% 9% English learners

School bond updates KISD 2019 bond $315 MILLION • Approved in November 2019 for capital improvement projects while not raising the KISD property tax rate • Projects include facilities upgrades as well as renovations across campuses

Special education students

10%

• www.kellerisd.net/bond NISD 2021 bond $737.5 MILLION

21%

6.71% 11.87%

Statewide

• Three of the four propositions were approved with no change to the tax rate • Projects include school facilities and capital improvements, middle school recreational facilities additions and purchase of additional technology devices • www.nisdtxbond.org

60.19% 20.64%

11.26%

11

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE Jennifer Price&Dr. Stephanie Espinosa Instructional leaders share insights on addressing learning loss

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Jennifer Price, the executive director of curriculum and instruction for Keller ISD, and Dr. Stephanie Espinosa, the executive director of curriculum and sta development for Northwest ISD, explained the challenges ahead, what strategies their districts will use and how parents can help oset learning loss caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI

make-up time lost or instruction lost as it did to lose it. So we all have to remember to be patient. … Our expectations have to be high, but we have to do it with compas- sion. And we have to think about our whole child and what are their needs that we need to focus on. WHATARE SOMEOF THE TOOLS NORTHWEST ISDWILL USE TO ADDRESS LEARNING LOSS? We have a lot of dierent data points to determine where our kids are. … Our instructional approach in (NISD) allows us to meet with students individually or in small groups everyday, and that’s really how we design the majority of our instruction in the district. That way, we can pinpoint their needs and meet with them in the areas they are struggling with the most. ... They might have intervention, or we have intervention courses that will meet those needs for students that have some gaps to be lled. We have advisory periods, which are very intentional, and we use those for students to get help in areas where they might have skill decits. ... We’ll meet those needs any way that we can and make sure that [students] get everything they need.

get frustrated, our kids get frus- trated. And so I think we really have to serve as that positive support model for kids. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TOOLS KELLER ISDWILL USE TOADDRESS LEARNING LOSS? We became a one-to-one [district] in technology device to students last year and … so we’ll continue to use those tools. Students will have their devices during the day, and then students will have the option to take their devices home, and they will be able to access those programs at home and during the school day. … For the students who did not pass [STAAR testing] our campuses are working to create their inter- vention plans for those students, and it’s going to look at a variety of ways depending on the campus. Our campuses will oer a variety of instructional methods such as before-school tutorials, after- school tutorial, Saturday school, summer school, [and] embedded interventions during the instruc- tional day. We’ve been looking at areas we really took a dip in and working with our campus principals to develop those strong intervention plans to assist with gap-closing.

Jennifer Price Keller ISD's Executive Director of Curriculum& Instruction

HOWCAN PARENTS HELP ADDRESS LEARNING LOSS WITH THEIR STUDENTS? The most foundational skills that kids need is to be able to read—to be able to draw opinions and think about what they’re reading, analyze what they’re reading, and interpret what they’re reading. So, from the youngest kids to the oldest kid: read. Read to your kid every night, if they’re young, or have them read to you and then ask them about what they’re reading. HOWSHOULDPARENTSAND THE COMMUNITYTHINK ABOUT THE CHALLENGEOF ADDRESSING LEARNING LOSS? We have to remember that it takes, oftentimes, twice as long to Dr. Stephanie Espinosa Northwest ISD's Executive Director of Curriculum& Sta Development

HOWCAN PARENTS HELP ADDRESS LEARNING LOSS WITH THEIR STUDENTS? I would encourage parents to focus on the positive—focus on how proud you are of your kid [and] how hard they’re trying. And asking about, “What did you do in school today?” Really being involved in the conversation. HOWSHOULDPARENTSAND THE COMMUNITYTHINK ABOUT THE CHALLENGEOF ADDRESSING LEARNING LOSS? We will not be able to x this in the rst nine weeks of school. We’re going to need patience and, really, a lot of encouragement and that positive reinforcement. Because kids—when we [parents]

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2021

AT THE CAPITOL

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

87th Texas Legislature passes public school curriculum, state testing bills Hundreds of bills aecting public education were led during the 87th Texas Legislature, which concluded its regular session at the end of May. Advocates with the statewide public education nonprot Raise Your Hand Texas applauded lawmakers for main- taining public school nance reforms passed in the 86th legislative session in 2019, not penalizing school districts for pandemic-related enrollment declines and committing to sending schools federal stimulus funding for pandemic recovery eorts. Some education bills failed or did not make it to the governor’s desk in time for nal approval. Legislators reconvened Aug. 7 for a special session with plans to revisit items such as a one-time payment for retired teachers. The following education-related bills passed during the regular 87th legislative session. Topics included school nance, curriculum devel- opment and school absences as well as changes to athletics eligibility for homeschooled and disabled students. COMPILED BY DANICA LLOYD

ACADEMICS &TESTING

CURRICULUM

SCHOOL FINANCE

HOUSE BILL 1603 Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston The bill removed the 2023 expiration date for individual graduation committees, which may allow students who failed up to two end-of-course exams to graduate if they have otherwise successfully completed all course requirements. HOUSE BILL 4545 Rep. Harold Dutton, D-Houston It removed the requirement that fth- and eighth-graders must pass certain State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness to move to the next grade level. Districts must provide accelerated learning to students who fail these exams.

HOUSE BILL 3979 Rep. Steve Toth, R-The Woodlands

HOUSE BILL 1525 Rep. Dan Huberty, R-Houston

The bill outlines what can and cannot be taught in public school social studies courses. Teachers cannot be required to discuss controversial public policy or social issues. Concepts that one race or sex is superior to others or that one is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive based on their race or sex cannot be taught in public schools. SENATE BILL 801 Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham The bill requires the Texas Education Agency to develop an agriculture education program for elementary students.

Known as the “cleanup bill” for the 86th session’s House Bill 3, HB 1525 adjusted various allotments and allows compensatory education funds to be used for social-emotional learning, instructional coaches and attendance ocers. It also prohibits the reduction of teacher salaries from 2019-20 levels. HOUSE BILL 3610 Rep. Barbara Gervin-Hawkins, D-San Antonio The bill exempts open-enrollment charter schools from paying property taxes on properties purchased, leased, built or renovated with state funds after Sept. 1, 2001.

SOURCES: TEXAS LEGISLATURE, RAISE YOUR HAND TEXAS, TEXAS PTA, TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

LEGISLATION

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

Keller, Northwest ISDs to implement newmandate New required accelerated instruction comes with logistical concerns

Additional highlights of HOUSE B I L L 4545

LEARN I NG COMMI T TEES

An accelerated learning committee will be established to develop an individual educational plan and monitor progress for any student who does not pass the STAAR math or reading test in grades three, ve or eight.

BY STEVEN RYZEWSKI

to remove [students] from foundation classes, enrichment classes or PE,” said Elizabeth Schrader, a specialist for ESC 11. Districts are considering before- and after-school sessions, and even Saturday school. But Jennifer Price, KISD Executive Director of Curric- ulum & Instruction, said nontra- ditional hours can be problematic, especially for older students. “They might be in band, or they’re in a sport or ne arts—that becomes really dicult,” Price said. Also, concerns with the legislation and its implications go beyond the logistics. NISD Superintendent Dr. Ryder Warren, for instance, said the law places too much importance on STAAR results. “With this one law, the state of Texas has made the STAAR the end- all, be-all,” Warren said. “This is going to relegate us to be test-passers.”

requirement, but it is based on the Teacher Incentive Allotment program passed by the Texas Legislature in 2019. According to Travis Whisenant, the instructional services director for Education Service Center [ESC] Region 11, most districts have not implemented the program yet—Whisenant said the process can be time intensive—and ocials from Keller ISD and Northwest ISD conrmed their districts have not implemented it. That leaves tutoring, which, for students who failed more than one exam, can total 60, 90 or even 120 hours. The instruction can occur during or outside of the normal school day and comes with a required ratio of no more than three students per instructor—unless waived by the student’s parents or guardian. “A lot of the challenge is with scheduling. ... [Sta] aren’t allowed

With the school year underway, local districts are working to comply with a new state law that requires each student who did not pass a standardized test in the spring to receive 30 hours of extra instruction per test failed. House Bill 4545 requires any student who did not pass a State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness exam in grades three through eight, or an end-of-course assessment at the high school level, to receive accelerated instruction, according to the Texas Education Agency. This can come in one of two forms: students can receive instruction from a certied master, exemplary or recognized classroom teacher, or they must receive 30 hours of tutoring for each test failed. The rst option presented in the bill bypasses the 30-hour

GRADE RETENT I ON

A student in grade ve or eight is no longer required to be retained at the same grade level based on STAAR testing results.

TEACHER REQUESTS

Under HB 4545, parents have the right to request the student be placed with a dierent teacher in the applicable subject area.

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • AUGUST 2021

CAMPUS DATA

2 0 2 1 P U B L I C E D U C A T I O N E D I T I O N

A closer look at campus-level data from local districts CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY KIRA LOVELL At 51 square miles, Keller ISD serves all of the city of Keller and portions of eight other cities in Tarrant County: Colleyville, Fort Worth, Haltom City, Hurst, North Richland Hills, Southlake, Watauga and Westlake. These charts show what portion of students are a part of certain special populations. KELLER ISD

Understanding the table The tables below compare campuses within their districts across a variety of categories dened by the Texas Education Agency.

ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED Students who are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, come from a family with an income below the poverty line or are eligible for other specic assistance or benets ENGLISH LEARNER Identied by the Language Prociency Assessment Committee, students who have another primary language and are learning English DYSLEXIC Students identied as having dyslexia or other related disorders SPECIAL EDUCATION Students participating in a special edu- cation program or another program us- ing special education support services, aids or other special arrangements

AT RISK Students identied as at risk of dropping out of school based on state-dened criteria, which can include performance, alternative education enrollment, expulsion and homelessness, among other factors TITLE I Students in Title I programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which provide funding for students of low-income families. N/A indicates that the count is unavailable to comply with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. These numbers are typically small, according to the Texas Education Agency. CTE Students enrolled in a state-approved career and technical education course as electives or in a district’s CTE program; percent shown is for 2019-20, the most recent year available

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

1 Basswood 2 Bette Perot 3 Bluebonnet

2008 2004 2002 2008 2007 2021 2002 2006 2021 2001 2006

476 24.93% 55.88% 31.51% 14.08% 5.88% 42.44% 100% 545 -8.09% 21.28% 6.24% 8.44% 3.49% 19.82% N/A 599 13.66% 47.08% 12.52% 10.02% 6.51% 33.89% 100% 627 0.63% 48.96% 26.79% 12.92% 6.06% 34.93% 100% 569 -4.37% 22.50% 5.98% 14.59% 7.56% 15.47% N/A 469 -7.13% 8.74% N/A 10.02% 6.61% 8.96% N/A 557 -4.30% 30.52% 20.47% 16.34% 6.10% 26.39% N/A 587 6.15% 45.14% 12.95% 13.46% 5.45% 29.98% 100% 563 18.28% 50.80% 12.43% 17.58% 8.88% 29.13% 99.82% 387 2.38% 7.75% 2.58% 16.28% 6.98% 8.01% N/A 490 -14.04% 22.86% 3.47% 15.10% 7.14% 16.73% N/A

4 Caprock

5 Eagle Ridge 6 Florence 7 Freedom 8 Friendship 9 Heritage

SOURCES: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY, TEXAS LEGISLATURECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

10 Hidden Lakes 11 Independence

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

12 Keller Early Learning Center North 13 Keller Early Learning Center South

2010

192 -43.87 70.31% 36.98% 35.94% 0% 41.15% 0%

HIGH SCHOOLS

2016 1995 2005 2000 1998 1990 1978 2011 1991 2016 1984 1998 2004

253 -86.46 59.68% 34% 34% 0% 44.27% 5.93% 442 -0.67% 26.02% 7.24% 9.95% 7.24% 14.25% N/A 439 -2.44% 7.52% 3.42% 9.57% 7.52% 9.11% 0% 689 -12.45% 21.63% 11.47% 10.30% 6.68% 22.35% N/A 514 23.26% 61.28% 29.77% 16.15% 6.03% 40.47% 100% 553 -0.90% 24.23% 7.23% 10.85% 5.79% 12.66% N/A 634 14.86% 60.09% 23.97% 13.09% 5.68% 41.64% 99.84% 643 -5.44% 20.68% 11.98% 8.40% 5.44% 18.97% N/A 433 -7.08% 6.00% 4.39% 11.09% 6.24% 9.24% N/A 611 22.94% 36.17% 19.97% 13.09% 3.43% 28.81% N/A 397 -9.36% 57.68% 24.94% 13.35% 4.28% 34.51% 99.75% 519 -8.79% 15.80% 4.62% 10.21% 5.97% 12.33% N/A 541 -10.58% 19.22% 4.25% 15.34% 4.99% 21.63% N/A

14 Keller-Harvel

36 Central

2003 2,595 1.37% 26.09% 5.59% 9.98% 8.25% 39.15% 1.04% 82.42%

15 Liberty 16 Lone Star

37 Fossil Ridge

1996 1985 1994

2,338 2.19% 43.50% 12.53% 9.75% 9.07% 51.24% 22.46% 85.93% 3,173 0.60% 6.78% 2.02% 6.27% 8.48% 23.64% N/A 90.58%

38 Keller

17 North Riverside

39 Keller Learning Center 40 Timber Creek

18 Park Glen 19 Parkview

86 N/A 36.05% N/A 17.44% 17.44% 100% N/A N/A

2009 3,238 0.84% 19.92% 6.21% 8.89% 8.0% 32.24% .59% 85.14%

20 Ridgeview 21 Shady Grove 22 Sunset Valley 23 Whitley Road 24 Willis Lane

Districtwide Statewide 202021 DISTRICT DEMOGRAPHICS Students KELLER COLLEGIATE ACADEMY OPENED IN FALL 2021 AS KISD'S NEWEST TECHNICAL SCHOOL. DATA FOR THIS SCHOOL HAS NOT YET BEEN TABULATED.

25 Woodland Springs

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

American Indian/Alaska native

0.43% 0.35%

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS

Asian

8.58% 4.73%

26 Bear Creek

1973

885 -8.20% 9.27% 2.71% 10.51% 13.90% 16.49% N/A 1,165 -2.75% 33.05% 9.10% 15.36% 10.47% 29.10% 15.71% 898 -8.46% 27.95% 13.14% 13.36% 15.70% 34.19% 12.69%

27 Parkwood Hill 28 Trinity Meadows

2000 2006

Black or African American

9.59% 12.69%

ENROLLMENT

202021 STUDENT POPULATION

Hispanic/Latino

23.98% 52.89%

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 29 Fossil Hill 30 Hillwood 31 Indian Springs

Native Hawaiian/other Pacic Islander

0.22% 0.15%

1986 2000 2001 1966 2010 2006 2017

743 -10.37% 53.16% 17.50% 14.27% 12.38% 62.99% 100%

Two or more races

1,301

1.01% 29.05% 7.23% 11.68% 9.76% 38.89% 1.38%

5.75% 2.68%

920 -3.36% 12.83% 3.80% 10.65% 10% 22.17% 1.20% 1,041 2.66% 7.88% 1.34% 7.98% 11.43% 19.12% 0% 1,137 -2.65% 21.11% 4.40% 12.05% 9.94% 30.08% 1.23% 969 1.57% 29.21% 10.11% 8.26% 13.42% 42.41% N/A 773 5.46% 43.34% 9.96 12.81% 9.96% 45.28% 100%

32 Keller

33 Timberview 34 Trinity Springs 35 Vista Ridge

White

51.45% 26.51%

16

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