Bay Area Edition | February 2021

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 7  FEB. 25MARCH 25, 2021

ONLINE AT

While sitting on a Starbucks patio on El Dorado Boulevard in late January, Janice Rains-Moran called out to an elderly man shuing by in a baseball cap and oversized coat. The man approached where Rains-Moran was sitting with her daugh- ter, Danielle Rains. Despite the medical mask covering half his face, the man was immediately recognized as Troy, one of the more than 100 homeless people in the Clear Lake area the women know. CONTINUED ON 18 Homelessness not only a downtown Houston problem BY JAKE MAGEE

“THE PEOPLE OF TEXAS ARE

INFORMED THAT, IN ACCORDANCEWITH APROCLAMATION FROMTHE EXECUTIVE OF THE UNITED STATES, ALL SLAVES ARE FREE.” EXCERPT FROM GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 3, HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF TEXAS, GALVESTON, JUNE 19, 1865

COLLEEN FERGUSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Honoring Black legacies Bay Area studied for Emancipation Trail to commemorate liberation

Janice Rains-Moran (right) and her daughter Danielle Rains help homeless people in Clear Lake. Here they interact with Cowboy, a homeless man known in the area. JAKE MAGEECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

National Park Service ocials are studying a 51-mile stretch of land from Galveston to Houston for potential selection as one of just two trails in the United States honoring Black history. The same route taken by formerly enslaved people and others leaving Gal- veston is being studied for designation as a national historic trail, known as the Emancipation Trail, after Congress in 2020 approved an amendment to the National Trails System Act allowing for new designation. Juneteenth, celebrated each year on June 19, honors the day Union Gen. CONTINUED ON 20

for the city to terminate its agreement with Big League Dreams due to safety concerns and delinquent payment. Around 2004, League City part- nered with Big League Dreams, which has other locations in Texas, Califor- nia and Nevada, to build six baseball elds. Under the agreement, League Big LeagueDreams likely to reopen by summer under newname BY JAKE MAGEE

those softball players. There’s not an alternative place to play.” During closed session Jan. 12, League City City Council discussed the business at 1150 Big League Dreams Parkway, which oers six baseball elds on which residents can practice and play. After convening in open ses- sion, City Council voted unanimously

In a city already struggling to meet the demand for sports elds on which young athletes can practice and com- pete, the League City location of Big League Dreams will be closed for months. “It’s terrible,” City Manager John Baumgartner said. “It impacts all

CONTINUED ON 11

Texans struggle through ERCOT power grid strain

IMPACTS

TODO LIST

WEATHER

REAL ESTATE

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Powered by my heart. Imagine, just for a minute, all those things in life you treasure: expressing love for family, those daily interactions at work, and the one-of-a-kind moments of absolute happiness you really can’t describe. Now, imagine life without them. That’s how important your heart is. We know it too. And we want to help your heart to keep powering what you treasure most. Whatever those moments might be.

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Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

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FROMPAPAR: Last week’s winter storm had many of our readers without power or water or both, but we hope you are all safe. I know we are all tired of living through historic events, but our resilience is inspiring to see. Read our storm coverage on Page 10, and visit our site for more! Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

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FROM JAKE: Clear Lake has a homelessness problem, and some feel the edges of Houston are being ignored in favor of tackling homelessness in the inner city. See our front-page story for residents’ perspectives as well as experts’ opinions on this chronic issue. Jake Magee, EDITOR

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IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

7 YogaSix opened a Clear Lake studio location in mid-January at 5440 El Dorado Blvd., Ste. 200, Houston. Six different types of yoga classes are offered, and they are all being held outdoors and virtually, per the YogaSix website. As part of YogaSix’s COVID-19 protocols, participants must bring their own mat and props to each session, and instructors do not make hands-on adjustments during classes. 832-917-0100. www.yogasix.com/ location/clearlake-reserve COMING SOON 8 Houston Methodist Clear Lake Hospital is expanding by building an emergency care center in League City. Opening by the end of the year, the emergency care center at South Egret Bay Boulevard and Hwy. 96 will be open 24/7 and offer emergency room services, such as X-rays, ultrasounds and private treatment rooms. The hospital is building a similar emergency center in Deer Park. 281-333-5503. www.houstonmethodist.org 9 After League City City Council’s unanimous approval at its Feb. 9 meeting, Lelia Southern Settings will open at an undetermined date at 720 Second St., League City. The business will be a venue for small events, such as weddings and bridal and baby showers, set in a historical building. The man who created the Galveston seawall once lived in this house, and the granite beneath the house came from the same quarry as the seawall, officials said. 10 Cloud Wine & Spirits will open in March at 3040 S. Gulf Freeway, Ste. G, League City. The store will offer wine classes and wine tastings along with a unique selection of craft beer, wine and liquor, owner Kalpesh Patel said. 11 Amazon plans to open a 180,000-square-foot delivery station at 4975 Gulf Freeway in La Marque later in 2021. The company has more than 150 delivery stations across the country, but this will be Amazon’s first in Galveston County, according to a city of La Marque news release. The delivery station is expected to bring hundreds of new jobs to the city, ranging from drivers to primary management positions and team

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NOWOPEN 1 Abendigo’s Cafe and Cupcakes opened in late December at 1035 Clear Lake City Blvd., Houston. The business refers to itself as a boutique scratch bakery with a passion for the simple things. The restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner; several types of drinks, including coffee; and sweets, such as cupcakes and cookies. 832-284-4454. www.abendigoscafeandcupcakes.com 2 Dimassi’s Mediterranean Buffet opened its first Bay Area location Dec. 11 at 19443 Gulf Fwy., Webster. The eatery serves authentic Mediterranean and Halal cuisine with lunch, dinner and weekend buffet menus and also fulfills catering orders. There are 10 other Houston-area

locations, according to the Dimassi’s website. 281-724-9805. www.dimassis.com 3 DentAllon Dentistry opened in December at 1234 NASA Parkway, Houston. The dental practice offers preventive, cosmetic and restorative dentistry services as well as dental implants. League City native Liel Allon wants to provide her community with a level of knowledge and comfortability found nowhere else in League City dentistry, according to DentAllon’s website. 832-975-0780. www.dentallondentistry.com 4 The Healthy Crave opened at 3136 NASA Parkway, Ste. B1, Seabrook, in mid-October. The smoothie bar features healthy snacks, more than 70 smoothie flavors, and more than 30 energy- and

metabolism-boosting drinks. Staff also offer nutrition coaching. 281-549-6756. www.thehealthycrave.com 5 Scoop Craft Creamery opened at 937 W. Bay Area Blvd., Webster, in mid- February. The creamery sells premium ice cream made in-house as well as an assortment of milkshakes, cookies and coffee. www.scoophtx.com 6 Airrosti Rehab Centers—Space Center opened Dec. 7 at 1335 Space Park Drive, Ste. B, Houston. Airrosti helps patients diagnose and treat injuries. According to the business, Airrosti helps patients report injury resolution within three visits. The business offers telehealth and remote recovery options. 800-404-6050. www.airrosti.com/ location/texas/space

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

Crust Pizza Co.

COURTESY CRUST PIZZA CO.

CLOSINGS 14 After 50 years in the Bay Area, the owners of Franca’s Real Italian Restaurant announced the closure of the business via Facebook on Nov. 26. The restaurant was located at 1101 E. NASA Parkway, Houston, and served traditional Italian entrees and gourmet 12-inch pizzas. www.facebook.com/francasrealitalian IN THE NEWS 15 Nature conservation nonprofit Galveston Bay Foundation , 1725 Hwy. 146, Kemah, acquired 106 acres of land on Dollar Bay as part of its continued effort to protect coastal habitat, according to a Dec. 17 media release. The newly conserved property is directly adjacent to a planned marsh restoration site. Preservation of the property also protects a land buffer for the wetland restoration area, helping to conserve native prairie habitat and coastal wetlands. 281-332-3381. www.galvbay.org 16 In late January, the Clear Lake Area Chamber of Commerce announced re:3D , 1100 Hercules Ave., Ste. 220, Houston, had won a Tibbetts Award from the U.S. Small Business Administration. The award honors small businesses at the forefront of technology, and only one other Hous- ton startup won such an award. The 3D printing company was founded in 2013 by NASA contractors Samantha Snabes and Matthew Fiedler to tackle large-scale 3D printing challenges. 512-730-0033. www.re3d.org

leads, per the release. It will be located on an area of land just south of Gulfway Plaza and north of Team Mancuso Powersports near Abundant Life Christian Center. 12 Deep Waters Academy will open in the fall and operate out of Hope Church at 770 Pineloch Drive, Houston. As a University-Model School, the academy offers a hybrid education to students in kindergarten to sixth grade where in-person education occurs twice a week. The academy aims to partner with Christian parents in the education and formation of their children, Head of School Amelia Chiara said. 281-694-5582. www.deepwatersacademy.org Crust Pizza Co. is celebrating 10 years in business by opening eight locations in Texas and Louisiana in 2021, including a Webster location. The address and opening date are to be determined. Crust Pizza Co. makes its dough from scratch daily and uses freshly shredded cheeses and chopped meats on its pizzas. The business also serves pastas, sandwiches and salads. www.crustpizzaco.com ANNIVERSARIES 13 The Caroline Luxury Apartments , 1235 E. NASA Parkway, Houston, in No- vember celebrated its one-year anniver- sary. The 334-unit multifamily facility offers resort-style accommodations, including three pools, outdoor kitch- ens, business and fitness centers, a pet grooming station and covered parking. 832-539-4992. www.thecaroline.com

Kelsey-Seybold Clinic

COURTESY KELSEY-SEYBOLD CLINIC

FEATURED IMPACT EXPANSIONS On Feb. 2, Kelsey-Seybold Clinic – Pasadena, 5001 E. SamHouston Parkway S, Pasadena, held a groundbreaking ceremony for its upcoming expansion. The clinic will nearly double in size from 15 to 27 providers with expanded rotations in many specialties. The expansion is 17,000 square feet and will result in the clinic totaling over 50,000 square feet. The expansion will be complete by the fall.

The facility opened at 15,000 square feet in 1984, then expanded to its existing 33,000 square feet in 2013. This next expansion will result in the facility totaling over 50,000 square feet. 713-442-7100. www.kelsey-seybold.com

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THIS INFORMATION WAS ACCURATE AS OF FEB. 19. FOLLOW COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM FOR THE LATEST BUSINESS AND RESTAURANT NEWS UPDATES.

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TODO LIST

February & March events

COMPILED BY BEN DICKERSON

27 TEXAS GOURMET FARMERSMARKET At this monthly pop-up market presented by the Associated Credit Union of Texas, shoppers can browse food and goods from various local businesses and vendors. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free (entry). 1095 W. League City Parkway, League City. www.visitbayareahouston.com/ calendar/texas-gourmet-farmers- market/2021-02-27 28 HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY CENTENNIAL JUBILEE To celebrate Harris County Public Library’s hundredth year—as well as the nal day of Black History Month—all branches of the library, in partnership with Apollo Chamber Three Acres Food Truck Park will host this family-friendly event featuring encounters with exotic animals as well as food trucks and live music. The park’s outdoor venue will allow for social distancing. 5-9 p.m. (food trucks), 6 p.m. (animals arrive), 7-9 p.m. (live music). $5 (entry, age 14 and up), $3 (petting zoo entry), $3 (petting zoo feed cup). Three Acres Food Truck Park, 10648 FM 1764, Santa Fe. 281-910-9817. www.visitbayareahouston.com/calendar/ exotic-petting-zoo-at-three-acres-food- truck-park/2021-03-12

The Lone Star Flight Museum will host a full week of activities for children and families during spring break, including hands-on science experiments, ight simulators and hangar tours. Various times. $14.95 (adults); $12.95 (seniors, children ages 12-17); $9.95 (children ages 4-11). Lone Star Flight Museum, 11551 Aerospace Ave., Houston. 346-708-2517. www.lonestaright.org/ events/springbreak

EXOTIC PETTING ZOO THREE ACRES FOOD TRUCK PARK

SPRING BREAK LONE STAR FLIGHT MUSEUM

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COURTESY THREE ACRES FOOD TRUCK PARK

COURTESY LONE STAR FLIGHT MUSEUM

FEBRUARY 26 THROUGH 28 WINTERTIME BLUES AT THE KEMAH BOARDWALK

families. 7:45-10:30 a.m. $15 (children), $30 (adults). Clear Creek Community Church, 999 N. Egret Bay Blvd., League City. www.sanctuaryfostercare.org/ creek5k 13 FAMILY CAMPOUT AT SPACE CENTER HOUSTON This overnight family event will engage children and parents in space- and aeronautics-related activities, including building model rockets, engineering and coding exercises, and educational opportunities. All guests must be age 5 or older. $69.95 (per person). 6 p.m.-10:30 a.m. Space Center Houston, 1601 NASA Parkway, Houston. 281-244-2100. www.spacecenter.org

Players, will present digital art and musical performances. Featured artists include visual artist Phillip Pyle, musicians Damien Sneed and Paul Cornish, and the Houston Ebony Opera Guild. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Virtual event. www.hcpl.net/events/42136 MARCH 06 CREEK5 5K BENEFITING THE SANCTUARY Clear Creek Community Church will be the starting point for an outside, COVID-19 restriction-compliant 5K fun run to benet The Sanctuary Foster Care Services, a Bay Area nonprot that provides services for foster children and

Guests at this event can take advantage of weekend discounts to check out all the rides, dining and activities on the Kemah Boardwalk. 8 a.m.-11:30 p.m. (Fri.-Sun.). $24.99 (rst all-day ride pass), $5 (second pass). Must present coupon for oer; visit https://bit.ly/3geyowq. Kemah Boardwalk, 215 Kipp Ave., Kemah. www.visitbayareahouston.com/calendar/ wintertime-blues-at-the-kemah- boardwalk/2021-02-26

Find more or submit Bay Area events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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BAY AREA EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

WEATHER Winter conditions bring outages to isolated Texas power grid

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

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Winter collapse A Feb. 11 press release from ERCOT stated the agency issued notices from Feb. 8-11 about the cold weather expected to hit Texas and that gener- ators were asked to prepare for it. ERCOT followed with a Feb. 14 notice asking customers to reduce electricity through Feb. 16. The next day, ERCOT announced the council had begun rotating outages at 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15. More than 4.3 million Texans were without power the morning of Feb. 16, according to poweroutage.us. Despite early warnings, Ramanan Krishnamoorti, a chemical engineer- ing professor and chief energy ocer at the University of Houston, said he believes the state’s reliance on market conditions to manage supply and demand is partially responsible for outages given providers’ lack of incen- tive to begin production in advance of the supply shortage. He and Cohan also cited a low supply of natural gas. “The shortfall in natural gas supply is about 20 times as large as the shortfall in wind supply compared to expectations for a winter peak cold event,” Cohan said. Planning ahead The statewide outages were the fourth such event in ERCOT’s history. One result of the most recent event in February 2011—also caused by win- ter weather—was the publication of a federal report outlining past failures of power generators and recommending ERCOT and other authorities make winterization eorts a top concern.

BY BEN THOMPSON

WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2 3

Widespread power outages prompted by severe weather across Texas in February led to increased focus on the Electric Reliability Coun- cil of Texas, which manages statewide electric power ow. The failure of portions of the state’s power grid left millions of Texans without electric service the week of Feb. 15-19. As blackouts and power restoration eorts continued, public ocials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, called for an investigation of ERCOT. ERCOT did not respond to phone calls or email requests for comment. An independent system Texas’ power grid has long been controlled within the state, separate from eastern and western North Amer- ican interconnects. Founded in 1970, ERCOT operates under the supervision of the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Texas Legislature and manages most of the state’s electric system and retail market. ERCOT ocials have highlighted benets of the insular system in the past, although its disconnect from the continent’s larger grids has left it prone to isolation issues during high-demand events, such as Febru- ary’s winter storms, experts said. “Staying independent keeps the management of our power systems within Texas. But it means that we can barely import any power when we need it most,” Daniel Cohan, a Rice University civil and environmental engineering professor, said via email.

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ERCOT INTERCONNECTION

ERCOT’s grid provides electric

ERCOT man- ages 90%

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

power to the majority of Texans.

of the Texas electrical load.

Real-time data varies, but more than half of ERCOT’s generation capacity comes from natural gas. Experts cited a natural gas shortage in February’s power outages.

POWER BREAKDOWN

2021 ERCOT grid power generating capacity 51% Natural gas 4.9% Nuclear

24.8% Wind 3.8% Solar

13.4% Coal 1.9% Other

0.2% Storage

TRACKING THE OUTAGES Millions of Texans lost power during winter storms Feb. 15-18.

• At 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15 , ERCOT began rotating outages from customers statewide • As much as 16,500 megawatts removed

• 4.3 million Texans were without power at 9 a.m. Feb. 16 • 184,487 Texans were without power at 12:30 p.m. Feb. 19

from the grid due to forced outages Feb. 15 • 1 megawatt can power about 200 households during peak demand

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Beyond just following previous recommendations, the state and power suppliers could have further incentivized preparation for the record-breaking conditions experi- enced, Krishnamoorti said. “We knew that this polar vortex was coming at least a week ahead. We

could have planned,” he said. Cohan said he hopes the state will take a broader range of issues into consideration for potential updates to its energy systems. “We need to look beyond the elec- tricity system and realize that this is an energy systems crisis,” he said.

2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Limi ted f i e l ds League City residents looking to play baseball or softball in the city have only a few options, and with Big League Dreams’ closure, those options are dwindling. SOURCE: CITY OF LEAGUE CITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

resident who used the facility for years to play softball with his friends. While the sudden closure was sur- prising to some, Bahr said he was not shocked. “Everyone playing there knew something was coming because of the lack of maintenance from Big League,” he said. Athletes who were using Big League Dreams are now looking for facilities in Friendswood, Galveston or other nearby locations to continue playing. The League City location was nice because it was centralized; people from Houston and Galveston came to Big League Dreams to play together, Bahr said. “It’s fun having it here in League City for sure,” he said. “If we do lose it, it’s a little bit of a hit to the gut after being there so long.” Before February ends, the city plans to open a request for proposals for a new operator to reopen the facility by early summer. Big League Dreams will likely oer a proposal, but it is likely the facility will eventually operate under a new name, Baumgartner said. Whoever takes over the elds will have to pay about $2 million to get the facility in reasonable shape, he said. Those who used Big League Dreams will not be keen to return unless the facility is rejuvenated before opening, Bahr said. The move has aected not only players who use the elds, but even businesses in the area, ocials said. A Faireld Inn & Suites across the street from Big League Dreams has already seen room cancellations due to the closure, Marketing Director Tejal Patel said in an email. “We did build this hotel based on Big League Dreams being a major rev- enue channel for us,” she said. “The closing of BLD will impact our hotel by a revenue reduction of at least 40% during the summer months and 25%

CONTINUED FROM 1

City built the facility on city land, and Big League Dreams operated and pro- grammed the facility while providing a yearly maintenance and operations fee to the city, along with 1% of gross revenue Big League Dreams made. Big League Dreams was also responsible for maintaining the facility in “rst- class condition,” Baumgartner said. “It’s like a long-term lease,” he said of the agreement. The debt League City pays each year for the facility uctuates but most recently totaled $1.1 million. Meanwhile, Big League Dreams’ most recent annual fee paid to the city was about $250,000, meaning the facility operates at a loss, Baumgartner said. The tradeo is the city received additional elds on which residents could play, he said. The only other place in the city where residents can practice and compete is the Chester L. Davis Sportsplex, which has 26 elds, all at capacity. Before COVID-19 hit, Big League Dreams was late twice paying the city its annual fee, due Sept. 30 of each year. In November, when Big League Dreams was late a third time, the city sent the company a notice of default, saying payment was late and the elds were not in good condition. “We paid $30 million to set some- one up in business, and they let us down,” Mayor Pat Hallisey said. “We don’t want that to happen again.” Big League Dreams paid in early January but did not make xes to the elds, leading the council’s decision to terminate the agreement, Baumgart- ner said. Big League Dreams’ owners declined to comment. “The turf has reached its age,” Baumgartner said, also noting chairs and benches are broken, water meters are leaking, netting is torn, and more. “The list goes on. It’s pretty long.” Steven Bahr is a League City

Chester L. Davis Sportsplex has 10 baseball elds, 10 soccer elds and six volleyball courts, but due to high demand, the elds are at capacity.

$1.1M is League City’s most recent debt service cost for the Big League Dreams facility. $250,000 is how much Big League Dreams pays League City in annual fees to operate the facility.

96

Big League Dreams has six elds but closed in January after League City found several safety issues and the operator failed three times to pay city fees on time. The facility will likely not reopen before the summer.

Bay Colony Park will include two soccer-football- lacrosse elds, ve softball elds, four baseball elds and four tennis-pickleball courts. The rst phase includes the ve softball elds, but construction is not set to begin until early 2023.

ERVIN AVE.

BIG LEAGUE DREAMS PKWY.

45

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Tell us what you think. Comment at communityimpact.com.

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY in the winter months.”

numerous new athletic elds along Ervin Avenue near Calder Road, but construction is two years away. “It’s a hardship on everybody,” Baumgartner said. “Nobody wants to see the facility closed.”

Other businesses in the area that prot from players may take a hit, ocials said. The city is working to build Bay Colony Park, which would include

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Clear Creek ISD

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

Clear Creek ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month at 1955 W. NASA Blvd., Webster. Watch online at www. ccisd.net/boardmeeting. MEETINGSWE COVER

Williams begins CCISD tenure

District begins 2021-22 planning amid COVID-19

CLEARCREEK ISD Eric Williams, Clear Creek ISD’s new superintendent, plans to spend his first months on the job discovering how the district can sustain and build on its quality of education. Williams plans in his first 90 days to meet with students, parents and staff to learn what they feel is going well in classrooms and what could be improved, he said. Aside from on-campus experiences, he also plans to interact at parent-teacher association meetings and events hosted by community organizations. The district is an ideal size for fostering community relations, he added. His first day as superinten- dent was Jan. 18. Williams spent time seeing students in action at elementary and secondary campuses during his first week, observing the adjustments made to educational practices amid COVID-19, he said Jan. 21. The campus visits gave him

glimpses of both the posi- tivity and the tiredness the CCISD community is experi- encing, he said. Williams was a superinten- dent in another district during the financial crisis of the late 2000s. The experience he gained during this time will inform him as he and other leaders navigate the effects of COVID-19 in the Bay Area. If cuts must be made, he would move to protect classroom expenditures with the most direct effect on teaching and learning, Williams said. He would work with the board to set priorities and take a deep dive into the specifics of all spending, which he added is already fairly lean at the dis- trict level. Williams empha- sized the new normal in the district needs to focus on “progress, not perfection.” “In a high-achieving place like CCISD, I think it’s natural for people to hold themselves to unrealistic standards,” he said.

CLEAR CREEK ISD Clear Creek ISD is welcoming more students back to in-person classes as the district awaits news on whether online learning will be funded next school year. The district saw an uptick in students returning to in-person instruction after the holiday break. About three in every four students are now engaged in brick- and-mortar instruction;

gears in some aspects to accommodate the increas- ing on-campus population, and Williams thanked community members for bearing with the district as staffing arrangements are made. “We appreciate the community’s patience as we work to fully staff transpor- tation and our classrooms,” he said. District leaders are work- ing to provide additional opportunities for CCISD’s youngest learners in prekin- dergarten and kindergarten, he added. The existence of an online education platform depends in large part on

Clear Creek ISD student breakdown as of January

in brick-and-mortar in Clear Connections 10,101 30,700

SOURCE: CLEAR CREEK ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

30,700 students have returned to in-person schooling, and 10,101

whether virtual learning will be funded by the Texas Legislature, Williams said. However, the district does not expect the platform to fully go away.

remain online using Clear Connections, Williams said. As more students return to campuses, staff must shift

Challenger Stadiumbecomes rotatingvaccine site

CLEAR CREEK ISD The parking lot of Clear Creek ISD’s Challenger Columbia Stadiumwill be one of eight rotating vaccination sites operated by Harris County Public Health, Superin- tendent Eric Williams said during a Jan. 25 board of trustees meeting. The site was turned into a COVID-19 vaccination site Jan. 27-30, according to dis- trict leaders. County officials

will return in late February to provide recipients with their second vaccine dose, Williams said. In accordance with Texas Department of State Health Services guidelines, vaccines are being admin- istered only to those who qualify under Phases 1A and 1B of the state of Texas’ vaccination plan, including individuals over age 65 and those considered high-risk

based on preexisting conditions. Both Galveston and Harris counties have established vaccine wait lists, where residents answer a series of questions regarding health status. Signing up on the wait list is not the same as scheduling an appointment; it means registrants will be contacted once they qualify for a vaccine based on age and health.

First 90days and beyond

New Superintendent Eric Williams plans to begin fostering community relations during his initial weeks in CCISD, using the connections made to build on existing success. Listen, learn from community at events Spend time on campuses Protect classroom expenditures Build upon “whole person” focus

SOURCE: CLEAR CREEK ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BAY AREA EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from League City, Houston, Nassau Bay & Clear Lake Shores

City Council debates controversial apartment complex proposal

Candidates le for local BayArea elections

Proposed apartments A majority of the public comments for this development were opposed to rezoning.

BY JAKE MAGEE

BAYAREA The May 1 elections for Nas- sau Bay City Council, Clear Lake Shores City Council and the Clear Creek ISD board are approaching, and candidates are vying for positions. In Nassau Bay, incumbent Don Matter will face Tyler Gregory and Don Hollow- ell for City Council Position 1. Ashley Graves and incumbent Sandra Mossman will run unopposed for Positions 3 and 5, respectively. Graves was on council until Novem- ber, when she ran and lost her bid for mayor, which resulted in her losing her council seat. In Clear Lake Shores, the mayoral posi- tion and the seats of Council Members Christy Lyons and Jan Bailey are up for grabs. Mayor Kurt Otten is running unop- posed, and Monica Newell-Ledet and Steve Wirtes are running unopposed for council. In Clear Creek ISD, Districts 4 and 5 and At-Large Position A are up for election. Running are Jerey Larson and incumbent Page Rander for District 4; Christine Parizo, Keith Esthay and incumbent Jay Cunningham for District 5; and Kevin Oditt, Marlene Montesinos, Michael Creedon, Jonathan Cottrell and incumbent Jennifer Broddle for At-Large Position A.

BY JAKE MAGEE

Pinnacle Park Apartments 339 units

City sta recommended City Council approve the rezoning request with the idea that retail shops would be built near the apartment building. However, residents vehemently disagreed. Council received doz- ens, if not hundreds, of comments related to this development, the vast majority of which opposed the rezoning. Residents cited concerns about crime, trac, quality of life and other factors when express- ing opposition to building more apartments in League City. Council members seemed split on the issue, with some siding with residents. “The citizens clearly don’t want it,” Council Member Nick Long said of ground-level apartments. Council Member Hank Dugie disagreed and said that not rezon- ing the land could mean nothing at all gets built, which would not, he said, be a good deal for the city.

LEAGUE CITY After hours of debate, League City City Council voted 5-2 in a rst reading to approve a rezoning of land near Big League Dreams frommixed- use commercial to multifamily residential. The rezoning comes as a result of developer CityStreet Residential Partners’ request. The developer has a plan to turn an 11-acre plot of land near the intersection of Big League Dreams Parkway and Brookport Drive into an apartment complex, Pinnacle Park Apart- ments, comprising 339 units. A mixed-use commercial devel- opment would require CityStreet Residential Partners to build retail spaces for shops on the rst oor of the building. The developer’s plan instead calls for building 97 residential units on the ground level, which is what prompted the request for the land to be rezoned.

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SOURCE: CITY OF LEAGUE CITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

“I don’t think we’re going to get a better option,” he said. “This will pay for itself and more.” John Cutrer, a developer at CityStreet, said the apartments will be high-end and will drive retail to the area. Long amended the motion to approve the rezoning under the condition that CityStreet make one piece of the development a retail space open within 18 months. The motion passed with Council Members Andy Mann and Justin Hicks opposed and Chad Tressler abstaining.

HoustonOKs grace period for those behind on rent HOUSTON Tenants behind on rent payments may have until the end of March to resolve the issue without facing eviction. BY EMMA WHALEN County and the city of Houston. Ocials are also working through the details of a $1 billion rent statewide relief program announced Feb. 9 by Gov. Greg Abbott. NUMBERTOKNOW $159million is how much Houston and Harris County have dedicated to a rent-relief program.

What positions up for election May 1?

• Nassau Bay City Council positions 1, 3 and 5 • Two Clear Lake Shores City Council positions

• Clear Lake Shores mayor • Clear Creek ISD districts 4 and 5 and At-Large Position A

Amid the continued coronavi- rus-related economic downturn, City Council voted Feb. 17 to extend the amount of time renters have to resolve payment issues before a landlord can pursue an eviction. The ordinance applies through March 31. In Texas, tenants have three days to resolve a missed payment before landlords can le an eviction. This begins the process of scheduling a court date and, if granted by a jus- tice of the peace, county constables forcing a renter to vacate. Turner said the city is pursuing the grace period ordinance to allow local ocials time to coordinate the recently approved $159 million rent relief program distributed by Harris

“I do not think people ought to be evicted while these dollars are coming in this time period because the dollars are there,” Turner said. Applications for the Houston and Harris County rent-relief fund will begin Feb. 18 for landlords and Feb. 25 for tenants. The proposed ordinance comes months after it was rst pushed for by housing advocates and formally proposed by the Houston-Harris County Housing Stability Task Force. The task force, which was a volunteer board of local housing experts, advocates and real estate industry leaders, proposed an indef- inite 30-day grace period ordinance in July. At that time, a statewide

moratorium on evictions was days away from expiring. Instead, Turner pulled the city of Houston’s participation from the task force and stated his opposition to the proposed ordinance. He said it would only put renters in deeper debt and that he would prefer to focus the city’s eorts on securing and distributing rent relief funding. In September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a nationwide eviction moratorium; however, data shows that thousands of evic- tions have continued to proceed in Harris County since it took eect Sept 4.

League City City Council meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 400 W. Walker St., League City. Meetings are streamed at www.facebook.com/ leaguecitytexas. Houston City Council meets weekly at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays for public comment and 9 a.m. Wednesdays for regular business at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. MEETINGSWE COVER

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BAY AREA EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

HOMELESSNESS BY THE NUMBERS

people hide away during the day and come out at night, but counts are done during the day, Rains-Moran said. Feeling forgotten One of the challenges of address- ing Clear Lake’s homeless population is that most services and shelters are located 20 miles away in down- town Houston. Star of Hope, SEARCH Homeless Services, the Salvation Army, and dozens of other programs and organizations dedicated to eradi- cating homelessness are based where ocials say homelessness is most prevalent: inside Loop 610. “All the big guns are downtown,” Villarreal said. “Consequently, most of their case workers and their sta are downtown dealing with that group.” However, Clear Lake’s residents are not seeing the benet of their tax dollars at work addressing homeless- ness in their own community, Villar- real said. The result is residents feel forgotten and that no one is truly working to address the homelessness epidemic in Clear Lake, residents said. “We’re taxpayers too,” Villarreal said. “We want some services.” One of the keys to addressing home- lessness is meeting homeless people where they are. Homeless people will not necessarily want to move to where services are, said Thao Costis, president and CEO of SEARCH Home- less Services, the lead homelessness case management service in Houston. “Someone from Clear Lake is not gonna wanna come into downtown, and vice versa,” she said. “People wanna stay where they’re familiar— where they know somewhat what’s around them.” While discussing this problem with Rains-Moran and Rains, Troy agreed. “My home is this end of Houston, not that end,” he said, pointing toward downtown. Nelson said Family Promise of Clear Creek was formed to supplement the lack of city services dealingwith home- lessness. The Bay Area is too far from both Houston and Galveston to get the true resources it needs to address the problem, so nonprots have to ll the gap, she said. “We’re kind of in no man’s land,” she said. “We have a huge need in our com- munity to serve.” Still, she is encouraged; sinceCOVID- 19 hit, local nonprots have banded together like never before to step up to the challenge of homelessness. “Even though we don’t get the needs lled like larger cities do, our

CONTINUED FROM 1

Amount of homeless

Rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing

“This is the hub of our homeless,” Rains-Moran said, referencing the area around the intersection of I-45 and El Dorado. Troy, who is known by other home- less people for having only three toes on one foot, mentioned his foot was hurting. Rains took the time to remove his shoe and change his ban- dages before sending Troy on his way. Rains-Moran and Rains are known as “mamas” to the homeless people of Clear Lake. They run the 2,400-mem- ber Facebook group Revitalize Clear Lake, which aims to address issues adversely aecting quality of life, including homelessness. Since December 2019, the two local residents have noticed a steady growth in the number of homeless people in the area, and they both do their best to get to know the local homeless population and help them as best they can. That help can be anything from giving them food to hiring them to clean up trash in an area to driving them to the hospital, the women said. But it is not enough. The women and other residents feel forgotten and neglected by Houston services and want to see a greater eort made to address the homeless population in Clear Lake, which can bring other problems, such as prostitution, drugs, theft and violence, they said. “We have a larger homeless group than anybody’s aware of,” Rains-Mo- ran said. “We have a need, and it is spreading. If we don’t stop it where it is, it’s gonna get worse.” Growing problem Every year in January, the Coali- tion for the Homeless, a group that oversees dozens of homeless agen- cies in Houston and Harris County, conducts a point-in-time count of the homeless people across the Greater Houston area. While recent point- in-time counts show a 53% decline in the number of homeless people in the Greater Houston area since 2011, locals said they have noticed an increase in Clear Lake. Shelley Villarreal, who runs another Facebook advocacy group called Reclaim Clear Lake, said she has seen the homeless population almost dou- ble from around 50 in late 2019 to over 110 today. “Really, for the past year, we’ve seen the population explode,” she said. “It’s growing.” Villarreal believes homeless people

In 2020, the Coalition for the Homeless counted a total of 2,202 sheltered and 1,551 unsheltered homeless people in Harris County. Of those, three were counted as unsheltered in Clear Lake.

Since 2012, The Way Home has housed thousands through permanent supportive housing, which is targeted at the chronically homeless, and rapid rehousing, which is targeted at those with lesser needs.

Rapid rehousing

Permanent supportive housing

Unsheltered 41.3% 1,548

Sheltered 58.6% 2,202

500 1K 1.5K 2K 2.5K

2013 2014 2012 0

0.1% 3 Unsheltered in Clear Lake

2015 2016 2017

2020 2018

Sheltered count and unsheltered count

Since 2011, homelessness counts have decreased 53% due to eorts starting in 2012 to permanently house homeless people before oering them other services. Data includes homeless counts from Houston, Harris County, Pasadena and Fort Bend County. Sheltered count Unsheltered count

10,000

7,500

5,000

2,500

0

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2018

2019 2020

2017

SOURCE: COALITION FOR THE HOMELESSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

have success panhandling in the au- ent areas of Clear Lake, which encour- ages them to stay. Additionally, the local drug scene draws the chronically homeless to the Clear Lake area; many area homeless people are addicts, Vil- larreal said. Harris County Precinct 2 Commis- sioner Adrian Garcia, who has made eorts to help the homeless as both a Houston City Council member and Harris County sheri, said “aggres- sive” eorts made to address home- lessness in downtown Houston may have pushed the population to the edges of town, including Clear Lake. “I think their issues are valid,” Garcia said of Clear Lake residents’ concerns over growing homeless populations. Gayle Nelson, the executive direc- tor of Family Promise of Clear Creek, a nonprot that helps homeless fam- ilies, also concluded the problem is worsening. In 2020, the nonprot helped 17 families totaling 57 people, which was double the number the group helped in 2019. Nelson said the nonprot

helps the “hidden homeless”—those who are too ashamed and afraid to admit to anyone they need help—and that COVID-19 is a big reason for the increase. “People weren’t nding the resources out there that they needed to survive,” she said. “And now it’s coming back again.” The 2021 point-in-time count has not been ocially unveiled, but o- cials said there may have been a small decrease compared to the count of 3,974 last year. However, in 2020, three homeless people were counted in the Clear Lake area, which is a frac- tion of the more than 100 residents know in the area. To count homeless people, the coalition drives around areas where homeless people regularly con- gregate, such as underpasses and bridges. However, it is not uncommon for homeless people to bolt at the sight of approaching strangers, which could be one of the reasons the coali- tion’s count may be much lower than the true count, Rains-Moran said. Additionally, many homeless

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