Katy Edition | February 2021

KATY EDITION

VOLUME 9, ISSUE 6  FEB. 24MARCH 24, 2021

ONLINE AT

Fort Bend County Sheri Eric Fagan entered oce on Jan. 1 with several priorities in mind—including a mission to reverse a 2019 policy regarding the county’s emergency dispatch practices, which he accomplished during week one. For decades, the practice of Fort Bend County dispatchers answering 911 calls for unincorporated areas of the county was to send the closest law enforce- ment ocial—whether from the sher- i’s oce or a constable’s oce—to the scene to respond. On Jan. 1, 2019, however, former Sher- i Troy Nehls implemented a policy change, directing dispatchers instead CONTINUED ON 22 Dispatchpolicy reversal relieves countyocials BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

IN FORT BEND COUNTY

The Fort Bend County Sheri’s Oce has deputies specically assigned to 31 neighborhoods through a contract program in which the homeowners association or municipal utility district pays for the extra patrol. The extra units are often closest to the scene of an emergency and dispatched before a sheri’s deputy to respond.

SOURCE: FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

IMPACTS

6

“IF SOMEONEWAS BREAKING INTO YOURHOME, WOULD ITMATTER TOYOU IF ITWAS A CONSTABLE THAT GOT THERE FIRST ORA SHERIFF’SDEPUTY? ” ERIC FAGAN, FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF

10

Planning mobility tomatch growth

6

1093

99

TRANSPORTATION

9

The number of contracts Fort Bend County Sheri’s Oce has in the Katy area 13

90

69

Texans struggle through ERCOT power grid strain

6

99

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

BRAZOS RIVER

CAMP GUIDE CAMP FEATURE CAMP LISTINGS 2021 WEATHER

13

INSIDE

24

In pursuit of equity A study in Harris County released in October shows a disparity in how the county selects rms to contract with on its projects.

Nonminority or nonwomen business enterprises*

Hispanic owned

Black owned

White women owned

Asian owned

Native American owned

*INCLUDES PUBLICLY TRADED COMPANIES, EMPLOYEEOWNED COMPANIES

15 16

Ownership of the companies to receive county contracts (by dollar)

Weighted availability for county contracts

Disparity ratio

Between scal year 2015-16 and rst quarter 2019, Harris County approved: 478 prime contracts worth $1.26 billion Prime contractors received: $980.2M Subcontractors received: $280.5M

The utilization of minority- and women-owned business enterprises divided by availability

0.4%

3.2%

0.1%

10.7% 8.4% 5.9% 3%

0.5%

0.6%

A ratio of 80% or lower suggests discriminatory barriers.

4.6%

71.6%

90.9%

DINING FEATURE

21

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY, COLLETTE HOLT & ASSOCIATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Join your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . S nap or visit Contribute today!

Experience

WITHOUT LEAVING

The sun, sand and blue waters of Spring Break will be right here at Lago Mar! Relax on the shore of Texas' Largest Crystal Lagoons® amenity and enjoy everything we have to offer! • WHITE SAND BEACHES • Inflatable obstacle course • Kayaking • Stand-up paddleboards • Resort-style cabanas • Food trucks Join the Fun! MAR. 12-28

Visit our Builder Model Homes for Special Discounts on Spring Break Tickets!

Spring Break FUN TICKETS

New Homes from the $200-$500s · LagoMar in TexasCity.com Prices and availability are subject to change without notice.

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Providing Better Options for HEART & VASCULAR CARE in Katy & West Houston

Through specialized programs, clinical trials and a commitment to challenging conventional thinking, our comprehensive team of cardiovascular specialists is improving outcomes and providing better options for heart and vascular care in your community.

PARK ROW DR.

HOUSTON METHODIST WEST HOSPITAL

Our doctors specialize in treating a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases and disorders, including:

• Coronary artery disease • Heart failure • Heart rhythm disorders

• Valve disease • Vein and artery disorders

West Houston-Katy

And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe throughout your visit.

To find a doctor or schedule an appointment, visit houstonmethodist.org/debakey/west or call 713.DEBAKEY .

3

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

Enrollment for 2021-2022 school year now open, preschool through 12th grade! Enrollment for 2021-2022 school year now open, preschool through 12th grade! Enrollment for 2021-2022 school year now open, preschool through 12th grade !

faithwest.org | 281-391-5683 | 2225 Porter Road | Katy, TX 77493 Call our Admissions Team today or email csturm@faithwest.org to set up your personalized family tour faithwest.org | 281-391-5683 | 2225 Porter Road | Katy, TX 77493 Call our Admissions Team today or email csturm@faithwest.org to set up your personalized fa ily tour Call our Admissions Team today or email csturm@faithwest.org to set up your personalized family tour

HOMEDEPOT.COM/MYCABINETMAKEOVER 281-971-9092

Place portrait photo here

HDIE20K0019

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: Attention parents and caregivers—we have a great resource for you to nd safe and fun summer activities for your kiddos in this month’s edition. Our annual Camp Guide (see Page 16) oers choices in several categories, so whether your children like art, music, sports or computer classes, you’ll nd something to keep them busy. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMLAURA: In this issue, we look at a policy reversal made to the Fort Bend County emergency dispatching system and contract inequities in Harris County. Readers can expect more coverage of the eects of our extreme February weather next month in our March issue—but, in the meantime, can nd up-to-date coverage every day on our website. Laura Aebi, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez EDITOR Laura Aebi REPORTER Morgan Theophil

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chase Brooks ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Drewa METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Thank you to the advertisers in this edition who support our work. We would love for our readers to thank them as well.

local, reliable reporting. Become a CI Patron today with a contribution of any amount. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving.

245 Commerce Green Blvd. Ste. 200 Sugar Land, TX 77478 • 3463682555 PRESS RELEASES ktynews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewskty

35%

of Patrons opt for recurring monthly contributions

@impactnews_kty

© 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

$10 is the average minimum

Patrons have chosen to give

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

5

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

3

9

12

18

99 TOLL

FRANZ RD.

August & Ivy

CANE ISLAND PKWY.

5TH ST.

CANTILE P

2ND ST.

COURTESY AUGUST & IVY

6

3

1

HIGHWAY BLVD.

KATY FWY.

GRAND W. BLVD.

90

10

11

6 Advance LED Solutions opened its rst Katy location at 1245 N. Fry Road, Ste. C, Katy, in January. The business, which specializes in providing light solutions for residential and commercial projects, has several other locations throughout the

8

17

K I N G

A

N D

PIN OAK RD.

15

Houston area. 281-717-4912. www.advanceledsolution.com COMING SOON

19

10

HIGHLAND KNOLLS DR.

1463

2

GEORGE BUSH PARK

7 Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa , a 475-plus unit massage and facial spa franchise, will open at 6230 FM 1463, Ste. 650, Fulshear, on March 5. The spa will be the rst Hand & Stone location in Fulshear. Hand & Stone works to make luxury spa services accessible for the general public. The spa will oer mem- bership options. 281-310-5330. www.handandstonefulshear.com 8 Cherry Block Craft Butcher + Kitchen , a modern steakhouse that focuses on us- ing responsibly sourced food, is expected to open at 5305 Highway Blvd., Katy, in February. The business, which aims to bring craft meats and seasonal Texas cooking to the area, will service both wholesale and retail customers. The mar- ket will feature a dry-aging room, custom bacon, custom seasonings, chef-prepared meals and more. A location is also open- ing at The Stomping Grounds at Garden

E R

1463

99 TOLL

14

CROSS CREEK BEND LN.

16

90A

LIBERTY ST.

F R Y R D .

5

7

W. AIRPORT BLVD.

4

20

13

1093

TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

723

NOWOPEN 1 3 Little Pigs Ramen , a ramen restau- rant, had a soft opening in late January at 1223 Grand W. Blvd., Ste. B103, Katy. Customers build their own ramen bowl by picking the broth, noodles and toppings of their choice. 832-321-3582. www.facebook.com/3littlepigskaty 2 Tawakkul Grocers opened at 25757 Westheimer Parkway, Ste. 170, Katy, about two months ago. The grocery

4 The Bowl Pho Vietnamese Noodle House opened at 26440 FM 1093, Ste. B150, Katy, in January. The restaurant serves noodle soups and other traditional Vietnamese dishes. 832-437-7315. www.facebook.com/ thebowlphonoodlehouse 5 Messina Hof Harvest Green Winery & Kitchen has opened its dining room at 8921 Harlem Road, Richmond. The full-service restaurant includes a taproom with 24 oerings. 346-292-9463. www.messinahog.com

store, which sells Indian, Pakistani, Ban- gladesh and other South Asian products, is also a halal meat shop. 832-437-5730. www.facebook.com/tawakkulgrocers 3 August & Ivy , a new consignment boutique, opened Feb. 2 at 903B Ave. D, Katy. Products include cards, candles, jewelry, artwork and more. The bou- tique also features select antiques and furniture as well as personalized T-shirts, tea towels and other home accessories. 832-913-6605. www.augustandivyllc.com

Oaks in Houston later in 2021. www.cherryblockbutcher.com

9 F45 Morton Ranch , a tness studio that emphasizes team-based training workouts, is expected to open by the end of February at 3011 W. Grand Parkway N., Ste. 900, Katy. The tness studio

When you put your trust in Eagle’s Trace in West Houston, you choose a life of financial stability , care and connection , and healthy peace of mind .

Learn more today . Call 1-800-884-4174 or visit EaglesTrace.com for your FREE brochure.

Choose Senior Living at Eagle’s Trace.

West Houston EaglesTrace.com

Here are 3 reasons why...

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY LAURA AEBI & MORGAN THEOPHIL

7

8

Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa

Cherry Block Craft Butcher + Kitchen

COURTESY HAND & STONE MASSAGE AND FACIAL SPA

COURTESY CHERRY BLOCK CRAFT BUTCHER + KITCHEN

RELOCATIONS 15 Haven Presbyterian Church relo- cated to 1375 S. Mason Road, Katy, in January. Previously, the church was locat- ed inside BONA Fitness at 5007 E. Third St., Ste. 100, Katy. The congregation has about 70 members. 832-930-6490. www.havenkaty.com ANNIVERSARIES 16 Palinuro Italian Cuisine , at 27131 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Katy, celebrated its one-year anniversary in December. The restaurant serves soups, pastas, salads, specialized meat dishes and other Italian meals. 281-394-2495. www.palinuroitalian.com NEWMANAGEMENT 17 Grub Burger Bar at 19143 Katy Free- way, Ste. 100, Houston, has new manage- ment and celebrated a grand reopening in January after a coronavirus pandemic-re- 18 Maniyo Nail Spa , at 3040 N. Fry Road, Katy, has new management as of early 2021. The nail spa oers a variety of nail and beauty services. 281-828-9229. RENOVATIONS 19 Tianie Nails & Facial , at 1540 S. Mason Road, Katy, was remodeled in late 2020. The business, which oers a vari- ety of nail services, remodeled to have a more modern look. 281-693-0666. www.facebook.com/Tianie-Nails- Facial-101082391426484/ lated closure. 281-800-9555. www.grubkitchenandbar.com

emphasizes motivation, innovation and results for a workout that is eective and fun. 281-400-1441. www.f45training.com/mortonranch 10 Dogtopia , which oers dog day care, boarding and spa services, will open a new location in Katy at 1815 S. Mason Road in June or July. Dogtopia’s facilities feature spacious, supervised playrooms, an o-leash environment and more. 281-417-6010. www.dogtopia.com/katy 11 Katy Crossing Icehouse is opening in the summer at 5733 Second St., Katy. The two-story structure will host a bar, a private events space and an outdoor patio. It will oer an expansive beer and wine list as well as craft cocktails. www.facebook.com/katycrossingicehouse 12 The Billiard Factory , which sells high-end indoor and outdoor home furniture and accessories, is expected to have a grand opening at 2811 W. Grand Parkway N., Ste. B, Katy, in March. The store will sell pool tables, theater-style seats and more. 281-581-0688. www.billiardfactory.com 13 Teriyaki Madness , a fast-casual Asian restaurant, is coming to 6300 FM 1463, Fulshear, in mid-March. The restau- rant will serve bowls of Asian-inspired teriyaki food with fresh vegetables, rice and protein. www.teriyakimadness.com 14 Bath & Bodyworks will be opening its second Richmond location at The Grand at Aliana in April. The opening comes approximately one month after Ross Dress for Less, Ulta and Michaels Crafts opened in the same Target-an- chored shopping center.

Seismique features 9 million LED lights and 111 projectors.

COURTESY SEISMIQUE

WORTH THE TRIP NOWOPEN Seismique, a technology-fueled experiential art museum, opened at 2306 S. Hwy. 6, Houston, on Dec. 26. With more than 40 dierent galleries created by 65 artists and crafters, the museum’s exhibits explore topics such as extraterrestrial beings, articial intelligence, immersive experiences, gamication and more. Seismique’s mission, in part, is to support local artists, and to that goal, the museum reserved 12 of the galleries for Houston-based artists. Furthermore, the museum hopes to serve as an educational experience for local schools looking for technology-driven learning opportunities. “I am really looking forward to seeing the expressions on people’s faces when they experience Seismique for the rst time—I liken it to the equivalent of walking through a portal and into an alternative universe that is a feast for the senses,” IN THE NEWS 20 Fort Bend County ocials broke ground on a new emergency operations center Feb. 1. The two-story building will be about 24,000 square feet and will consolidate oces and communications

Seismique creator Steve Kopelman said. “This year has been exceedingly dicult for the whole world, and we want Seismique to serve as something of a pandemic panacea—a place where visitors can transport themselves to another realm and nd creative inspiration through the artistic manifestation of 40 dierent exhibits.” Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Seismique is operating at limited capacity and requiring masks. 346-202-6006. www.seismique.com

PIPING ROCK LN.

GEORGE BUSH PARK

6

N

spaces to best accommodate the coun- ty’s response to weather, re and other emergencies, according to county docu- ments. The new center will be located in the 300 block of Fort Street in Richmond. The facility will also include a detached bay for emergency vehicles.

Expect Better SM from your Katy neighbors!

As your neighbors, who better to tell the story of our community and your home. Put our energy, enthusiasm and market expertise to work for you, getting you the results you deserve!

Mary Kiesewetter 713.725.0108

Linda Wade Team 281.492.5951

Bob Miles 281.797.1600

©2017 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens ® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers.

7

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

PROJECTS TOWATCH

UPCOMING PROJECTS

UpcomingKaty transportation projects focused on increasingmobility tomatch continued growth

KATY MILLS DR.

KATY MILLS CIR.

KINGSLAND BL

FALCON POINT DR.

N

Of all the priorities for transportation projects in Katy slated for 2021 and the years ahead, increasing mobility to keep up with the city’s growth is at the forefront, according to Katy’s State of the City presentation inmid-January. During the annual presentation, city ocials acknowledged Katy’s elevated sales tax revenue and continued growth during the past year, despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. “People are coming,” City Adminis- trator Byron Hebert said at the event. “You can’t put a house on the market fast enough before it’s sold.” Tomeet that demand for growth, Hebert said, the city is focusing on transportation projects that will increase mobility for Katy’s current and future residents. “We’ve got to get people moving around here,” he said. Among the projects this year is the First Street extension and bridge project, which is an extension of First Street fromBartlett Road to Avenue D, Hebert said. As part of the project, Hebert said, the city plans to rebuild the bridge along the road that is over Cane Island Creek for drainage purposes. There is not a total cost associated with the project yet as it is still being designed, Hebert said. However, it will be funded by the Katy Develop- ment Authority and is expected to be completed this year. Additionally, the third phase of the Katy Fort Bend Road extension project,

Katy Fort Bend extension Phase 3 The project will extend Katy Fort Bend Road into the Katy Boardwalk District. This project is currently under design and is being funded by the Katy Devel- opment Authority. Timeline: project completion expected in 2021 Cost: TBD Funding source: TBD

City of Katy ocials plan to redo and lift the bridge over Cane Island Creek along the First Street extension for drainage purposes in 2021 as part of a project to increase mobility in the area. (Morgan Theophil/Community Impact Newspaper)

CLAY RD.

which will extend the road to the Katy Boardwalk District, is slated for this year, Hebert said. The project is still being designed and will be funded by the KDA. Additionally, the city has prelimi- nary plans for two other projects that will aidmobility in town, Hebert said. The rst will expand Pederson Road, and the second will expand Katy Hockley Road fromMorton Road to Clay Road. The two projects have not been funded but are on a list of future transportation projects, Hebert said. Both projects, he said, will essentially addmore lanes to the existing roads to increase space for drivers. The Texas Department of Trans- portation is alsomoving forward with projects in the Katy area that will help withmobility at large, Hebert said. Some of those eorts include wid- ening lanes of FM 1463 fromWestridge Creek Lane to Tamarron Parkway and Corbitt Road to Cinco Ranch

FIRST STREET EXTENSION AND BRIDGE PROJECT

MORTON RD.

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF FEB. 18. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT KTYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Katy Hockley Road project The project will expand Katy Hockley Road from Morton Road to Clay Road. The project is currently on a future proj- ects list and has not yet been funded or designed. Timeline: TBD Cost: TBD Funding source: TBD see it completed. “It is probably one of the most unique transportation projects I’ve been associated with,” he said. “It’s denitely going to be able to create the ability for all of that land to develop.”

90

1463

N

Boulevard, as well as widening several lanes fromTamarron Parkway to Corbitt Road and Cinco Ranch Boule- vard to FM 1093, TxDOT spokesperson Deidrea George said. TxDOT is also planning to widen lanes on I-10 from the Brazos River to east of FM 359, George said. The work is part of a greater $147.07 million project that began in 2017, she said. Finally, Hebert acknowledged the biggest project residents should watch in 2021 is the ongoing Texas Heritage Parkway project. Hebert said he is among the many city ocials and residents anxious to

From coughs and colds to stitches, x-rays, sprains and strains, Next Level Urgent Care will get you in quick and on the road to recovery in no time.

All better.

Now 4 locations in Katy! nextlevelurgentcare.com

Cinco Ranch 10705 Spring Green Blvd, Ste 600, Katy, TX 77494 Open 9 am-9pm, 7days a week

Falcon Landing 9722 Gaston Rd, Ste 190 Katy, TX 77494 Open 9am-9pm, 7days a week

Katy 1420 Katy Fort Bend Rd Katy, TX 77493 Open 9am-9pm, 7days a week

Kingsland 21700 Kingsland Blvd, Ste 104, Katy, TX 77450 Open 9am-9pm, 7days a week

Get in line online! Download the Next Level Mobile App and take convenience to a whole new level.

9

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

All Under One Roof

Commercial Lending | Commercial Real Estate Loans Construction | Personal Loans | Mortgage Home Equity | Home Improvement

To learn more, give us a call today or visit us online.

Lance Ramesh Commercial and Residential Construction Lending NMLS# 1575331 | 281-346-6004 | LRamesh@ffin.com 29818 FM 1093, Suite 100, Fulshear, TX 77441

MEMBER FDIC YOU FIRST

THE MADNESS IS COMING... ARE YOU READY?

HIGHEST RATED BASKETBALL GOAL

MANUFACTURER DIRECT PRICES

50% MORE GLASS & STEEL VS. BIG BOX STORE

$400 OF F INSTA L L AT ION Professional Installation on site - only $99 for a limited time! LIMITED TIME SPRING SPECIAL!! 1-888-600-8545

s

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED FOR OVER 36 YEARS .

WWW.PRODUNKHOOPS.COM

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COUNTY&SCHOOLS

News from Katy, Harris County & Fort Bend County

Harris County purchases 12,000newhybrid votingmachines

BY HANNAH ZEDAKER

implementing them by May. The machines feature a touch screen and provide the voter with a paper copy of their selections that the voter can verify before submitting the ballot into a ballot box, Longoria said. The systemwas used in six Texas counties in 2019 and will see its rst use in Harris County on May 1. According to a Jan. 26 news release from the Harris County Elections Administrator’s Oce, the rst 2,300 machines will be delivered by March 1.

VERIFYING THE VOTE

Harris County’s new Hart InterCivic Inc. Verity Voting Systems aim to enhance voter security and accessibility by oering the following features.

HARRIS COUNTY Voters will be the rst to use Harris County’s new voting machines, Hart InterCivic Inc. Verity Voting Systems, this May. On Jan. 26, with an expenditure of $54 million, the Harris County Commissioners Court authorized the purchase of 12,000 newmachines. According to Harris County Elections Administrator Isabel Longoria, the county has been working to purchase newmachines since 2019 with the goal of

Paper copy of voter selections to be reviewed before submission

Digital touch screen

Triple data backup to allow for easier election audit tracking

Americans with Disabilities Act- accessible controls and screen- toggling features

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATOR’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MEETINGSWE COVER

KISDboard calls for May bond election

Katy City Council meets virtually the second and fourth Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. The next meeting is March 8. City Hall, 910 Ave. C, Katy 281-391-4800 www.cityoaty.com Fulshear City Council meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. Irene Stern Community Center, 6920 Katy Fulshear Road, Fulshear 281-346-1796 www.fulsheartexas.gov Harris County Commissioners Court meets virtually Tuesday mornings twice a month. The next meeting is 10 a.m. on March 9. 1001 Preston Ave., Ste. 934, Houston 713-755-5000 www.harriscountytx.gov Fort Bend County Commissioners Court meets at 1 p.m. the rst, second, and fourth Tuesdays of the month. The next meeting is March 2. 401 Jackson St., Richmond 281-342-3411 www.fortbendcountytx.com

Thousands more COVID19 vaccines arrived in Fort Bend County on Feb. 9. (Courtesy University of Houston College of Nursing)

BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

KATY ISD More than $675 million worth of new facilities, renovations to existing campuses and upgrades for Katy ISD schools could be on the way if voters support a May bond package. The KISD board of trustees unanimously voted Feb. 8 to call for the bond referendum after hearing recommendations from KISD Chief Communications Ocer Andrea Grooms. A committee met several times in recent weeks to consider the bond before voting to recommend four propositions on Jan. 27. If all of the propositions are passed, the package would fund more than 400 campus and facility projects. The bond includes no change to the tax rate. Early voting for the May 1 election begins April 19.

Fort Bend County increases vaccine sta

BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

The announcement came two days after Fort Bend County Judge KP George said an additional 8,000 vaccines had arrived in the county. Since Fort Bend County has been deemed a vaccination hub by the state, he said, ocials expect vac- cines will be allocated to the county on a regular basis. Depending on distribution, the county could begin scaling back the additional sta in October but may keep some through the end of the year, said Dr. Jacquelyn Johnson- Minter, director of Fort Bend County Health and Human Services.

FORT BEND COUNTY About a dozen vaccine administration-re- lated positions will be created in Fort Bend County to help with distribution after a unanimous Feb. 11 vote at the Fort Bend County Commissioners Court meeting. Randi Lintner, the county’s human resources director, said the cost for the personnel for a one-year funding cycle will run about $1 million. It will be funded through Federal Emergency Management Agency public assistance grants, county ocials said.

Creating Happy, Healthy Smiles in Katy NEW PATIENT SPECIAL EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING $ 79 RESTRICTIONS APPLY.

3011 WEST GRAND PARKWAY N SUITE 200, KATY, TX 77449 832-409-4949 PEEKDENTISTRYTX.COM

DR. JOSHUA PENG

DR. BOWEN LI

11

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

GAMING ALL DAY YMCA Camp Cullen

Register your child, ages 7-17, for a premier summer overnight camp experience at YMCA Camp Cullen. From water sports and zip lining to horseback riding and science experiments, all in a safe and healthy environment without sacrificing any of the fun!

Located along the shores of Lake Livingston, just north of Houston State-of-the-art facilities Week-long summer sessions & school-year weekend family escapes Money-back registration guarantee

Register today at YMCACampCullen.org!

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome.

Registering for the 2021 Semester!

Imagine Early Education and Childcare

• Serving 6wk - 12 years • Infants and Toddlers

• School Age Programs • Academic Assessments

• Preschool & Pre-Kindergarten

20% OFF YOUR FIRST MONTH EXPIRES 3.24.21 • CODE: 5874

Independent Living | Assisted Living | Memory Care

( 832 ) 225-4590

TheDelaneyat P ARKWAY L AKES .com 21700 B ELLAIRE B OULEVARD | R ICHMOND , TX 77407

Cinco Ranch • 24224 Cinco Terrace Dr. • Katy, TX 77494 • Call Today 281-574-7109 www.imaginechild.com Schedule your tour today!

AL Facility ID# 106971

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WEATHER Winter conditions bring outages to isolated Texas power grid

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas manages an electric grid that covers most of Texas and is disconnected from larger interconnections covering the rest of the U.S.

1

2

Winter collapse A Feb. 11 press release from ERCOT stated the agency issued notices from Feb. 8-11 about the cold weather expected to hit Texas and that gener- ators were asked to prepare for it. ERCOT followed with a Feb. 14 notice asking customers to reduce electricity through Feb. 16. The next day, ERCOT announced the council had begun rotating outages at 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15. More than 4.3 million Texans were without power the morning of Feb. 16, according to poweroutage.us. Despite early warnings, Ramanan Krishnamoorti, a chemical engineer- ing professor and chief energy ocer at the University of Houston, said he believes the state’s reliance on market conditions to manage supply and demand is partially responsible for outages given providers’ lack of incen- tive to begin production in advance of the supply shortage. He and Cohan also cited a low supply of natural gas. “The shortfall in natural gas supply is about 20 times as large as the shortfall in wind supply compared to expectations for a winter peak cold event,” Cohan said. Planning ahead The statewide outages were the fourth such event in ERCOT’s history. One result of the most recent event in February 2011—also caused by win- ter weather—was the publication of a federal report outlining past failures of power generators and recommending ERCOT and other authorities make winterization eorts a top concern.

BY BEN THOMPSON

WESTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes El Paso and far West Texas 1 EASTERN INTERCONNECTION Includes portions of East Texas and the panhandle region 2 3

Widespread power outages prompted by severe weather across Texas in February led to increased focus on the Electric Reliability Coun- cil of Texas, which manages statewide electric power ow. The failure of portions of the state’s power grid left millions of Texans without electric service the week of Feb. 15-19. As blackouts and power restoration eorts continued, public ocials, including Gov. Greg Abbott, called for an investigation of ERCOT. ERCOT did not respond to phone calls or email requests for comment. An independent system Texas’ power grid has long been controlled within the state, separate from eastern and western North Amer- ican interconnects. Founded in 1970, ERCOT operates under the supervision of the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Texas Legislature and manages most of the state’s electric system and retail market. ERCOT ocials have highlighted benets of the insular system in the past, although its disconnect from the continent’s larger grids has left it prone to isolation issues during high-demand events, such as Febru- ary’s winter storms, experts said. “Staying independent keeps the management of our power systems within Texas. But it means that we can barely import any power when we need it most,” Daniel Cohan, a Rice University civil and environmental engineering professor, said via email.

3

ERCOT INTERCONNECTION

ERCOT’s grid provides electric

ERCOT man- ages 90%

ERCOT provides for 26 million customers.

ERCOT’s grid includes 46,500 miles of transmission.

power to the majority of Texans.

of the Texas electrical load.

Real-time data varies, but more than half of ERCOT’s generation capacity comes from natural gas. Experts cited a natural gas shortage in February’s power outages.

POWER BREAKDOWN

2021 ERCOT grid power generating capacity 51% Natural gas 4.9% Nuclear

24.8% Wind 3.8% Solar

13.4% Coal 1.9% Other

0.2% Storage

TRACKING THE OUTAGES Millions of Texans lost power during winter storms Feb. 15-18.

• At 1:25 a.m. Feb. 15 , ERCOT began rotating outages from customers statewide • As much as 16,500 megawatts removed

without power at 9 a.m. Feb. 16 • At least 1.4 million CenterPoint Energy customers were without power Feb. 15.

from the grid due to forced outages Feb. 15 • 1 megawatt can power about 200 households during peak demand • 4.3 million Texans were

SOURCES: ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL OF TEXAS, PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS, POWEROUTAGE.US COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Beyond just following previous recommendations, the state and power suppliers could have further incentivized preparation for the record-breaking conditions experi- enced, Krishnamoorti said. “We knew that this polar vortex was coming at least a week ahead. We

could have planned,” he said. Cohan said he hopes the state will take a broader range of issues into consideration for potential updates to its energy systems. “We need to look beyond the elec- tricity system and realize that this is an energy systems crisis,” he said.

Contact me for all your Real Estate needs! LINDA LEIBY 281-610-8644 23922 Cinco Village Center Blvd #123 Katy, TX 77494

WALMART

Linda.Leiby@garygreene.com www.LindaLeiby.com

Shop local for all of your beer, wine, and spirits!

2001 KATY MILLS BLVD., KATY, TX 77494 NEXT TO WALMART MON - SAT 10AM-9PM • 281-574-2992

©2016 Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Better Homes and Gardens ® is a registered trademark of Meredith Corporation licensed to Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate LLC. Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Franchise is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers.

13

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

WE KEEP YOUR HEALTH AND SAFETY TOP OF MIND AND CLOSE TO HOME

PRIMARY CARE, IMAGING, PHYSICAL THERAPY, 24/7 ER Memorial Hermann Convenient Care Centers give you easy, one-stop access to health care in your neighborhood. Plus, you can feel confident knowing that our Safe Wait ™ enhanced safety measures help keep you protected. From wellness exams to 24/7 emergency care, you and your family can get the quality health care you need all in one place. Visit memorialhermann.org/ccc or call 713.222.CARE to schedule an appointment.

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CAMP FEATURE

2 0 2 1 C A M P G U I D E

Carson’s Art School Spring break camp tailored to the artist C amps at Carson’s Art School do not require participants to t into a mold, owner Shawn BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

SPRING BREAK CAMP March 15-19 Camp times are 10 a.m.-12 p.m., 1-3 p.m. or 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers need to bring a sack lunch and drink if they are participating in a full day. Cost: $185 (half day), $350 (full day) Art supplies for campers ages 6 through 10 are provided. Drawing kits for ages 10 through 18 are available to purchase through Carson’s Art School for $32. The kit includes a 14-by-17- inch drawing pad, drawing pencils and three special erasers. The materials are required for the drawing class, so students must purchase the kit or bring their own.

he said. Many projects that campers work on are progressive, Carson said. For exam- ple, a student might begin a project during a spring break camp that they want to continue in the future, and they are then able and encouraged to return to it during a summer camp or at a later class, he said. “It allows people to keep moving with their work,” Carson said. The school has adapted to operate safely during the coronavirus pan- demic, Carson said. Socially distanced participants wear masks, and cleaning takes place between classes. The spring break camp is open to ages 6-18, Carson said. Though the most popular age group is often ages 6-12, teenagers are encouraged to participate too, he said. “Many people want a place to go and work on their art, and you can do that here,” he said.

Carson said. Instead, programs aim to develop the artistic talents of each individual student. “Our programs are designed based around the wants and needs of each participant, not the other way around,” Carson said. The family-owned business has been running Katy camps since 2014. From the start, the sta has prioritized one-on-one instruction, Carson said. “Camps are catered toward each individual,” he said. “It’s not a typical class where everyone sits down and paints an apple; it’s people working on their own projects and getting individual attention.” To that end, students often work in dierent mediums—fromwatercolors and paints to colored pencils or oils,

Students at Carson’s Art School work on individual projects that can continue over time. (Courtesy Carson’s Art School)

Carson’s Art School 5131 S. Fry Road, Katy 281-507-3039 www.carsonsartschool.com

CARRIAGE BEND DR.

N

ready for life. ready for college. At Marine Mi l i tary Academy, we are more than a college preparatory school - we are forging tomorrow’ s leaders. Thi s summer, your son can experi ence what MMA has to offer during 4 weeks of Summer Camp from June 26 - July 24. Your son wi ll learn valuable leadership ski lls, l i fe ski lls and make fri ends whi le part icipat ing in strength and adventure act ivi t i es des igned to bui ld conf idence and character. Scan the QR code to learn more about 2021 Summer Camp at MMA. » » AT T END A F R E E LOCA L PR E S ENTAT I ON ! Tu e sday, March 2 @ 7 pm Court yard Houston/Kat y Mi l ls 25402 Kat y Mi l ls Parkway 281 .960 . 0111 MARINE MILITARY ACADEMY

A Co l l e g e - Pr e p Board i ng Schoo l f or Boys i n Grade s 7- 12 »» 320 Iwo J ima B lvd . »» Har l i ng en , TX R E G I ST E R NOW F OR FA L L » MMA-TX . ORG »956 . 423 . 6006 »» ADMI S S I ONS@MMA-TX . ORG

15

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

C A M P G U I D E GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

COMPILED BY MORGAN THEOPHIL Parents looking for camps for their children have a number of options to choose from in the Katy area, including virtual options for families looking to socially distance during the pandemic. This list is not comprehensive.

2

7

A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day NIGHT Overnight SP Sports

tines and sports. Camps encourage being physically active to develop healthy lifestyle habits. DAY SP Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $149 weekly (half day) or $35 per child per day, $219 weekly (full day) or $55 per child per day, sibling discounts available www.katysportsandtness.com 832-222-9140 26440 FM 1093, Ste. C, Richmond 4 At the active USA Ninja Challenge spring break camp, instructors will guide kids through dierent obstacles, courses and games. The camp is open to partici- pants of all abilities. DAY SP Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $45 per participant per day www.ninjakatytx.com 281-394-1986 22564 Franz Road, Katy 5 Kids who attend camp at Athlete Training + Health will participate in weight training, skills drills, games and friendly competitions. Kids will work on coordination, teamwork skills and more. The camp strives to create a positive environment to increase a participant’s athletic ability through exposure to per- formance coaching. The camp is for kids ages 8-12. DAY SP Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $159; sibling discounts available www.athletetrainingandhealth.com/katy 713-568-8986 23910 Katy Freeway, Katy

SPRING BREAK CAMPS

1 Challenge Island camps teach science, technology, engineering and math skills through fun and engaging activities. This spring break, children will learn about natural disasters, decode spy messages, build roller coasters and more as they imagine, problem solve and participate in hands-on activities. A+ DAY Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $115 (half day), $215 (full day) www.challenge-island.com/ nwhouston-katy 281-901-1034 Cinco Ranch Lakehouse 25202 Springwood Lake Drive, Katy 2 Code Ninjas camps aim to transform a child’s love for technology into an exciting learning adventure. The camps are full of activities that help empower kids to gain valuable technology skills and make new friends. The camps are recommended for ages 7-14. A+ DAY Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $325 (full day) www.codeninjas.com/tx-katy-west/ camps/day-camp 281-665-7412 2780 FM 1463, Katy 3 Camps at Katy Sports and Fitness focus on sports and tness training while making sure the children have fun. The curriculum changes daily to keep each child engaged and interested in what they are learning. Through the duration of the camps, kids will be active through dierent games, activities, tness rou-

Code Ninjas

Camp West

COURTESY CODE NINJAS

COURTESY CAMP WEST

6 Pure Soccer specializes in focused training for young soccer athletes. Camp- ers will practice soccer skills including power shooting, dribbling and agility techniques. Camps are open for kids age 6 and older. DAY SP Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $250 for the week, $60 for an individual day depending on availability www.puresoccerkaty.com 346-387-6788 25730 Westheimer Parkway, Katy SUMMER CAMPS 7 At Camp West, campers can enjoy a sports complex with swimming lakes, a double gymnasium, a rock wall, two ball elds, sand volleyball courts and more. Campers are divided by age group and participate in age-appropriate activities with their counselors. Camp West is open to all children entering kindergarten through eighth grade. DAY Dates: June 14-18, June 21-25, June 28- July 2, July 12-16 Cost: $300 or $275, extra fees for early drop-o and late pickup www.campwest.org 281-391-5683

Faith West Academy 2225 Porter Road, Katy

8 This year, summer camps at Drama Kids International include “Fun With Fables,” a “Hollywood Who-Dun-It!” and “Inspiration Playhouse–Fairy Tales.” All camps include games, activities, crafts and performances. ART DAY Dates: J une 21-25, July 12-16, August 2-6 Cost: $175 (half day), $275 (full day) www.dramakids.com/katy-west-houston- cinco-ranch-fulshear-tx/ 281-829-2287 Cinco Ranch Lake House 25202 Springwood Lake Drive, Katy 9 Challenge Island camps teach sci- ence, technology, engineering and math skills through fun and engaging activities. The 2021 summer camps have a wide- range of themes, from “Potions Master,” “Time Travelers, “Mechanical Engineer- ing,” and more. A+ ART DAY NIGHT SP XX Dates: June 7-11, June 28-July 2, July 5-9, July 19-23 Cost: $120 (half day), $225 (full day) www.challenge-island.com/ nwhouston-katy 281-901-1034 Cinco Ranch Lakehouse 25202 Springwood Lake Drive, Katy

281-807-8700 or visit shrp.com POST TIME: 6:45PM SATURDAY, MARCH 20 TH OVER $700,000 IN PURSES!

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2021

and crafts, swimming, sports programs and more. DAY SP Dates: June 1-4, June 7-11, June 14-18, June 21-25, June 28-July 2, July 6-9, July 12-16, July 19-23, July 26-30, Aug. 2-6, Aug. 9-13 Cost: Prices for camps vary; most start at $175 www.ymcahouston.org/summer-camp 713-659-5566 A Camp Cinco 15050 Cinco Park Road, Katy B Mark A. Chapman YMCA at Katy Main Street 1350 Main St., Katy C Monty Ballard YMCA at Cinco Ranch 22807 Westheimer Parkway, Katy 13 Hosted by The Fellowship, Camp Cove’s goal is to connect kids with old and new friends in a fun and safe environ- ment. Children will learn about God and enjoy games, crafts and more. Camp Cove is open to kids ages 2 to 6. DAY Dates: June 7-10, June 14-17, June 21-24 Cost: TBD www.thefellowship.org 281-395-3950 campcove@thefellowship.org 22765 Westheimer Parkway, Katy 14 Code Ninjas camps aim to transform a child’s love for technology into an ex- citing learning adventure. Summer camps in 2021 cover a range of topics, including building your own website, coding an arcade from scratch, storytelling and moviemaking in Minecraft, and more. A+ DAY Dates: June 1-4, June 7-11, June 14-18, June 21-25, July 28-July 2, July 5-9, July 12-16, July 19-23, July 26-30, Aug. 2-6, Aug. 9-13 Cost: Prices for camps vary from $150-$300 www.codeninjas.com/tx-katy-west/camps/ day-camp 281-665-7412 2780 FM 1463, Katy

8

4

7 15

PORTER RD.

Z R D .

5

10

90

KINGSLAND BLV

12B

10

MAIN ST.

99 TOLL

6

Drama Kids International

2 14

COURTESY DRAMA KIDS INTERNATIONAL

1463

10 Funtastik Labs oers a variety of camps focused on science, arts, engineer- ing and more throughout the summer. Themes for camps in 2021 include “Crazy Chemistry,” “Future Entrepreneurs,” “The Artist’s Workshop,” “Inventors Boot- camp” and more. All camps are for kids ages 5-12. ART DAY Dates: May 31-June 4, June 7-11, June 14-18, June 21-25, June 28-July 2, July 6-9, July 12-16, July 19-23, July 26-30, Aug. 2-6, Aug. 9-13 Cost: $159 www.funtastiklabs.com 281-819-6363 615 S. Mason Road, Katy 11 The theme for this year’s Vacation Bible School at St. Faustina Catholic Church is “Treasured: Discovering You’re Priceless to God.” DAY Dates: July 19-23 Cost: TBD www.saintfaustinachurch.org 346-773-3500 vbs@saintfaustinachurch.org 28102 FM 1093, Fulshear 12 The YMCA oers summer camp pro- grams throughout the Greater Houston region, including at three locations in the Katy area. Camp activities include arts

13

12C

SPRING GREEN BLVD.

12A

1 8 9

1463

.

3

11

1093

N

KEY

Spring break camps

Summer camps

15 The University of Houston-Down- town hosts one- and two-week summer camps focused on technology, science, engineering, arts, nance and more in the Katy area at Faith West Academy. Camp programs include programming in Java, game design, public speaking and more. A+ DAY Dates: June 7-11, June 7-17, June 14-18, June 21-25, June 21-July 1, June 28-July 2, July 6-9, July 6-15, July 12-16 Cost: Varies www.compucamp2021.com Faith West Academy 2225 Porter Road, Katy

VIRTUAL CAMPS

Coder Kids camps help give kids the skills and tools to operate in the technolo- gy-driven world. The spring break camp choices this year include “Minecraft Adventure” and “Scratch Game Design.” The camps are for kids entering second through fth grade. A+ DAY Dates: March 15-19 Cost: $165 www.coderkids.com 832-640-9568

NOWOPEN IN KATY! PERSONALIZED VISION CARE FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

FARM & RANCH

Twice the Knowledge

Twice the Experience

BUY ONE GET ONE HALF OFF * Some restrictionsmay apply • Expires 3/31/2021 GET A PAIR WITH TRANSITIONS LENSES GET FREE LENSES ON YOUR SECOND PAIR!

Karen & Terren Roark 713-826-3275 | 832-693-2261

DR. STEVEN CHAU OPTOMETRIST

INFO@KTRoarkTeam.com WWW.KTRoarkTeam.com 25722 Kingsland Blvd., #209 Katy, TX 77494

23021Morton Ranch Rd Ste. DKaty, 77449 832-802-0632 • info@visionrepublictx.com

* Some restrictionsmay apply • Expires 3/31/2021

17

KATY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32

communityimpact.com

Powered by