Franklin | Brentwood Edition - May 2022

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 3  MAY 9JUNE 6, 2022

ONLINE AT

Bigmixed-use plans simmer east of I65 Developers consider best approach amid new trends

MIXED-USE SURGE

East of I-65 in Cool Springs, a slew of projects approved within the city’s regional commerce design concept zone seek to balance housing, retail and commercial uses. City planning guidelines allow taller heights and more density near I-65 as long as developers provide roads and utilities to support them.

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BY MARTIN CASSIDY

Already a regional corporate hub, a roster of approved development plans for mixed-use projects are set to transform Cool Springs in the area near East McEwen Drive and Carothers Parkway. On the southwest corner of the intersection, the developers of Aureum, Brentwood-based South- StarLLC, are aiming for an early 2023 start on con- struction of 350 units of multifamily housing. The units will be split between an 11-story building with a rooftop terrace and a ve-story building with a pool courtyard. The buildings would also have an outdoor promenade for pedestrians to cut between Aureum Drive and Aureum Trail. Glenn McGehee, owner of SouthStarLLC, said the rm is negotiating with prospects to occupy commer- cial space to provide dining, entertainment and other services. “We’re kicking things o in a very thoughtful and intentional way to accomplish some of the goals we set out to do,” McGehee said. “It is the overworked cliche of ‘live, work, play,’ but we want to create a sense of place that is where everyone wants to be.” After a decade plus of surging oce development in Cool Springs, a pocket of nearly-nished and planned future developments, such as Aureum, Ova- tion Park and Franklin Summit east of I-65 is set to

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The regional commerce design concept is meant to “attract large numbers of people and employers” from in and out of the city, according to Envision Franklin, the city’s land use master plan.

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THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

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FROMLACY: This month’s business and dining proles give a snapshot of two hard working families in our community. Our team is always trying to nd ways to bring you in-depth hyperlocal news on government, transportation, health and more. Visit communityimpact.com to sign up for our biweekly newsletter covering Franklin and Brentwood. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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FROMMARTIN: This month’s front page story takes a deeper look at the status of planned developments east of I-65 in Cool Springs. The permanent increase in people working from home has developers trying to nail the right balance of residential and other uses. Martin Cassidy, EDITOR

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CORRECTION: Volume 4, Issue 2 In a guide on page 13, County Commission candidate Charles Wayne Garrett should have been identied as a Republican and Timothy Stillings as a Franklin Special School District board incumbent.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Neighbors Franklin

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COURTESYNEIGHBORS FRANKLIN

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NOWOPEN 1 Brentwood Pediatric Care held a grand opening April 28 for its oce at 343 Franklin Road, Ste. 106, Brentwood, in the Brentwood Medical Center. The oce, led by Dr. Jill Kelly, oers check-ups, sick visits, newborn care, developmental screenings, injury care, and sports physicals for children, among other services. 615-814-4500. www.bwpedscare.com 2 Buckaroo Bandits opened in the CoolSprings Galleria in April at 1800 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1290, on level one of the mall. The shop oers Western-boho clothing for women, men and children as well as jewelry, shoes and other accessories. 615-432-6507. www.buckaroobandits.com 3 Guthrie Facial Plastic Surgery , a facial plastic surgery practice, opened a new oce at 1001 Health Park Drive, Ste. 420, Brentwood, in early May, according to Dr. Ashley J. Guthrie, the owner of the practice. Guthrie previously practiced at the Rousso Facial Plastic Surgery Clinic in Birmingham, Alabama. Guthrie performs a wide range of surgical procedures, including face, neck, brow and lip lifts; rhinoplasty; otoplasty; facial implants; and hair transplants. Nonsurgical services include dermal llers, Botox, radio-frequency microneedling and facial contouring. 615-880-9500. www.drashleyguthrie.com 4 Huckleberry Brewing Co. opened in mid-April at 600A Frazier Drive, Franklin. The brewery oers a selection of craft beers on tap, including a house lineup of brews, such as Hazy Loco Lager, Jamie’s

Juicy IPA and Pass Me the Wheat. The business also features a full kitchen serving up dinner options, including pizza, shrimp and grits, burgers and more. 615-721-7924. www.hucksbrew.com 5 Ichiddo Ramen opened in the CoolSprings Crossing shopping center in April at 1709 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1035, Franklin. The eatery oers a number of Japanese dishes, such as gyoza dumplings, spicy miso ramen, crispy chicken ramen and steamed buns. 615-628-8798. www.ichiddocoolsprings.com 6 Mindful Infusions of Tennessee held a grand opening and Williamson Inc. ribbon- cutting April 26 at 509 New Hwy. 96 W., Ste. 101, Franklin. The medical oce oers ketamine, NAD and vitamin infusions through IV therapy. The oce oers free consultations for new patients, according to the company’s website. 615-472-1017. www.mindfulinfusionstn.com 7 Neighbors Franklin , a bar and restaurant, opened a new location in April within the McEwen Northside development in Franklin, according to the ownership. The new restaurant is located at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 162, Franklin. It oers 24 beers on tap, serves a menu including smoked meats, and is adding new menu options such as grilled chicken and salmon, according to the ownership. The location is the third Nashville-area location after Sylvan Park and Germantown. 615-721-5667. www.neighborsnashville.com 8 Scissors & Scotch , a barbershop and spa, held a soft opening in mid-April at its new location at McEwen Northside in

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Scissors & Scotch

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COURTESY SCISSORS & SCOTCH

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Franklin, according to an announcement from Boyle Investment Co., the developer of the 45-acre mixed-use McEwen Northside development. The barbershop located at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Ste. 132, Franklin, oers haircuts, shaves and grooming and includes a full-service bar specializing in whiskey and including more than 100 spirits and craft beers, according to the announcement. 615-614-3210. www.scissorsscotch.com 9 UGlow Face & Body held a grand opening April 7 at 201 Franklin Road, Brentwood, in Hill Center Brentwood. The business oers medical services such as Botox, facial rejuvenation, fat removal using FirmSculpt and hair loss treatments. 615-358-9184. https://uglowfaceandbody.com COMING SOON 10 Dee-O-Gee , a natural pet supply store, will open its rst Tennessee location this summer in Franklin’s Town Center at Berry Farms, according to an announcement from the Boyle Investment Co., which developed the neighborhood. The new store at 6041 Rural Plains Circle, Ste. 132, will sell holistic retail pet foods, U.S.-made pet toys, dog grooming, do-it-yourself pet bathing tubs and oer dog day care, according to the announcement. The store will also have sta trained in pet nutrition and two certied animal dietitians on-site to help develop custom nutrition plans for your pet, according to the announcement. The store joins more than 40 other retail and service tenants in the Berry

Farms development. 615-614-3210. www.dee-o-gee.com RELOCATION 11 In early April, the Franklin Juice Co. temporarily relocated within The Factory at Franklin from inside the main building, located at 230 Franklin Road, Franklin, to Building 10 by the Franklin Farmers Market while the factory undergoes renovations. Franklin Juice Co. oers cold-pressed juices, Acai bowls and smoothies made with fresh fruit and vegetables. www.franklinjuice.com 12 Franklin-based tness studio Carbon Culture USA announced in early April it will merge with Franklin Athletic Club to create Carbon Performance, a new tness facility. The business is expected to begin operating out of the Franklin Athletic Club’s existing location at 112 Rand Place, Franklin, beginning in early June, according to a social media post from the company. The new business will feature youth and adult performance sports areas, a supplement and apparel store, new equipment and a wellness center. www.carbonculture-usa.com COMMUNITY 13 The Berry Farms community, located along Lewisburg Pike and Goose Creek Bypass in Franklin, announced in early April it has opened a new dog park located near the community’s Town Center. The dog park is open to apartment residents and homeowners within the community. The gated park features turf and an obstacle course for dogs. www.berryfarmstn.com

Mitsubishi Motors of North America Inc. will open a agship store at 1761 Galleria Blvd, Cool Springs, according to Jeremy Barnes, director of communications for the company. FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON COURTESY MITSUBISHI MOTORS OF NORTH AMERICA INC.

to McEwen Northside in late 2019, leasing the top oor of the building at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin. Barnes said the corporation is open to opportunities to give back to the community, citing employees providing time and the company’s donation of a Outlander Plug-In hybrid to the local Community Resource Center. “Being part of the community has been our corporate social responsibility,” Barnes said. www.mitsubishi.com

Mitsubishi Motors North America Inc. is aiming to open a new agship dealership at 1761 Galleria Blvd. in the former space of Pier One Imports at CoolSprings Galleria in July, according to Jeremy Barnes, director of communications for Mitsubishi Motors North America Inc. Barnes said the dealership is in part an armation of the corporation’s commitment to the city of Franklin and also Middle Tennessee. They established their corporate headquarters at McEwen Northside in Cool Springs in 2019. “This will be the closest dealership to our Cool Springs headquarters and only dealership in Williamson County,” Barnes said. “This is the public-facing manifestation of our move to Middle Tennessee, and saying this is our home.” The company announced it was moving its North American operations CLOSINGS 14 Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream closed its market stand location within The Factory at Franklin at 230 Franklin Road, Ste. 11, Franklin, in early April, according to Lauren Davidson, the company’s local public relations coordinator. Davidson said the closure is considered to be permanent. However, she said the scoop

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shop might reopen in The Factory at Franklin sometime after the interior remodeling. The shop oers a variety of ice cream avors, such as Gooey Butter Cake, Texas Sheet Cake and Wildberry Lavender. A second location of the store at McEwen Northside at 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin, remains open. www.jenis.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

TODO LIST

May, June & July events

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LIVEMUSIC FirstBankAmphitheater 4525 Graystone Quarry Lane, Franklin 615-544-6154 www.rstbankamphitheater.com MAY 06 Willie Nelson & Family 22 For King & Country 24 Halsey JULY 13 Steely Dan 14 Big Time Rush 19 Josh Groban

MAY 13 ENJOYANIGHTOUTTOSUPPORT HABITAT FORHUMANITY Habitat for Humanity Williamson-Maury hosts its annual Hammer & High Heels event to raise funding for future home builds for families in need. Attendees will enjoy a night of cocktails, food and music from the group Burning Las Vegas, as well as a silent auction. 6:30-11 p.m. $100 (individual general admission). The Factory at Franklin, 230 Franklin Road, Franklin. www.womenbuildtn.com 13 THROUGH 14 SEE ‘PEANUTS’ ON STAGE Performers from the youth theater group Act Too Players present “You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown,” a one-act play based on the comic strips by Charles M. Schultz. The performance is part of Act Too’s summer program; future summer shows include “Seussical Jr.,” “13: The Musical” and “Heathers: The Musical.” Times vary by show date. $15-$25. 419 Main St., Franklin. 615-538-2076. www.franklintheatre.com 19 ATTENDAPAINTANDSIPPARTY Wine & Design On Wheels, a traveling paint and sip party, will oer a class on painting Claude

Monet’s “Water Lilies,” at the Harpeth Hotel. 6 p.m. $45 (preregistration is required; price includes appetizer or beverage from a special hotel menu, and food and beverages will be available for purchase). 615-224-8082. www.wineanddesign.com 19 THROUGH 21 SADDLE UP FOR THE FRANKLIN RODEO The 73rd annual event returns to the Williamson County Ag Expo Center, featuring bull riding, food, competition events and family activities. A parade through downtown Franklin on May 14 will be at noon with a kick-o event from 6-8:30 p.m. at the expo center. $17-$25 (adults); $7-$12 (age 12 and younger). 4215 Long Lane, Franklin. UNDER THE SEA The Williamson County Performing Arts Center at Academy Park hosts a perfor- mance of Disney’s “The Little Mermaid Jr.” from Christian Youth Theatre Nashville, adapted from the lm and Broadway musical. Times vary by date. Reserved tickets start at $14. 112 Everbright Ave., Franklin. 615-786-0186, ext. 2524. www.wcpactn.com www.franklinrodeo.com 26 THROUGH 28 ENJOYMUSIC FROM

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OUTDOOR CONCERT CROCKETT PARK

JUNE 04 LEARN LIFESAVING CPR The city of Franklin hosts a free CPR class to help residents learn adult, child and infant resuscitation as well as choking procedures. The class is noncredentialed, and residents will not receive certication cards. 9 a.m.- noon. Free (preregistration is required). City Hall Training Room, 109 3rd Ave. S., Franklin. www.franklintn.gov/cpr food trucks, including pizza and ice cream. 6 p.m. Free (admission). 1500 Volunteer Parkway, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov (Courtesy city of Brentwood) The city of Brentwood kicks o its annual Summer Concert Series at Crockett Park featuring Monsters of Yacht. The event will also feature

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Find more or submit Franklin and Brentwood events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

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Nonprots partner to buildBrentwood bike trail Two nonprot groups recently

FUTURE PROJECT

Rock Solid Trail Contracting is completing a design to build a mountain bike trail at Marcella Vivrette Smith Park in Brentwood that could be open in spring 2023.

funded the professional design of a planned $100,000 mountain bike trail to be in the rear of Marcella Vivrette Smith Park that could be available by spring of 2023, members said. In early April, designers from Rock Solid Trail Contracting of Bentonville, Arkansas, spent four days surveying the 50-acre property to design the 6-mile trail, according to Ed Stanworth, board member of Bike Walk Brentwood. The design of the trail cost about $15,000, Stanworth said. “They are one of the top trail design- ers in the country, so it is exciting to have them involved,” Stanworth said. In March, Bike Walk Brentwood announced it was partnering with another local nonprot, Citizens for Brentwood Green Space, to raise money for the trail. Stanworth said the trail will also serve as a practice facility for Brentwood and Ravenwood High schools and other middle school

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This project will congure and build a new roundabout for the busy three- way intersection at Murray Lane and Holly Tree Gap Road, according to Brentwood ocials. Construction is expected to begin in late spring 2023 after right of way plans are completed and the city of Brentwood acquires needed right of way and easements. The project is expected to reduce backups in the area during peak morning and evening travel, according to the city. Timeline: 2023-24 Cost: $1.3 million Funding source: city of Brentwood

COURTESY BIKE WALK BRENTWOOD

teams that compete in the National Interscholastic Cycling Association. Once the design is nalized, the group expects the Brentwood Parks Commission and City Commission to vote on it sometime during this summer. The partnership plans to contract with a trail building rm to build parts of the trail, but it will also involve volunteers working under the direction of members of the statewide chapter of the Southern O-Road Bicycle Association, Stanworth said.

“The community will be invested and feel like they are part of it,” Stanworth said. Members of the O-Road Bicycle Association will also manage and maintain the trail, Stanworth said. Gil Hutchinson, president of Citizens for Brentwood Green Space, said his group got involved because there was obvious interest in the trail. “There is a lot of momentum and interest in this, and these guys are phenomenal in terms of the organiza- tion and what they’ve accomplished,” Hutchinson said of the trail system.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

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DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Projects underway in Franklin & Brentwood

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PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

RAVENWOODHIGH SCHOOL Williamson County Schools is working to complete an addition to Ravenwood High School, located at 1724 Wilson Pike in Brentwood. The two-story addition will add 22 new classrooms to the campus, using plans similar to the addition previously completed at Independence High School at 1776 Declaration Way, Thompson’s Station, according to the district. As of early spring, the project was on track to be complete by July.

BRIGHTSTONE Franklin-based nonprot BrightStone is constructing a 138-acre campus along Columbia Avenue just south of Franklin. The nonprot broke ground in 2019 on the campus—which will include residences, classrooms and greenhouses for developmentally disabled adults. The $25 million campus began construction in summer 2021, and Phase 1 of the project is slated to complete work later this year, according to the organization.

MCEWENNORTHSIDE Work is continuing on McEwen Northside, a 45-acre mixed-use center, as developer Boyle advances work on future oce and retail buildings along Aspen Grove Drive. Earlier this spring, the center welcomed new tenants Scissors & Scotch and Neighbors with plans to bring in companies such as Kimley-Horn, Gutterglove Inc. and OMNIA Partners. Phase 2 of the development will also include 424 multifamily residences and 126,000 square feet of oce space.

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SOUTHEASTMUNICIPAL PARK Work is continuing on the Southeast Municipal Park, a 188-acre recreational area between Carothers Parkway and I-65. The $31.2 million city of Franklin project will feature multipurpose sports elds, the Ellie G’s Dream World Inclusive Playground, a 12-mile perimeter trail and a bridge across the Harpeth River. Infrastructure work to provide access to the area is slated to be complete in mid-2022, and the park is estimated to be complete in 2025.

WESTHAVEN A new community for adults age 55 and older is under construction in Westhaven along New Hwy. 96 West and the Mack C. Hatcher Parkway in Franklin. The community, designed by Southern Land Co., will feature approximately 220 homes, including patio homes, townhomes, villas and condominiums, as well as an independent-living community with approximately 200 units for lease. The neighborhood is slated to be complete in 2024.

BALL FIELDS AT FREEDOM MIDDLE SCHOOL AND POPLAR GROVE SCHOOL The city of Franklin and Franklin Special School District are partnering on improvements to ball elds behind Freedom Middle School at 750 New Highway 96 W., Franklin. The city and FSSD will split the $6.2 million cost with work set to nish in the fall.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

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Upcoming events

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Music lineup for Pilgrimage announced

TENNESSEE RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL Castle Park 2124 Newcastle Road, Arrington http://tnrenfest.com/info.htm longer be permitted, per county event requirements. A full list of requirements and more information can be found at http://tnrenfest.com/info.htm. As part of negotiations with the Freeman family, the county has agreed to preserve the land as park property and has taken over the rights to the festival. The county intends to add other programs, events and rental opportunities to the grounds in the future, according to a release from the county. Past attendees may notice a few changes to this year’s event. Alcohol sales will no The Tennessee Renaissance Festival has returned for its 36th year; however, this year marks the rst festival presented by the Williamson County Parks and Recreation Department. County ocials announced April 25 the dates for the festival, spanning every Saturday and Sunday in May. Prior to Williamson County taking over, the festival was privately managed by the Freeman family, who also founded the festival, according to Williamson County. The festival grounds, located along I-840 on the edge of Williamson County in Arrington, have been renamed Castle Park. Williamson County takes over Tennessee Renaissance Festival

The Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival will return this fall for its eighth year in Franklin. Festival organizers announced April 20 the music lineup for the event set for Sept. 24-25 at The Park at Harlinsdale Farm. Headlining this year’s event are Chris Stapleton and Brandi Carlile as well as Jon Batiste, The Avett Brothers, Elle King and more than 30 additional acts. The festival—founded by Kevin Grin, Better Than Ezra singer and a Franklin resident— will take place over two days on multiple stages and will also feature exhibits on Americana music, the Farm to Turntable Food Truck Park and a Makers Village with vendors. During the event, residents can expect to see road closures along Franklin Road near park entrances. Tickets for the event have gone on sale and were available starting

THE PILGRIMAGE MUSIC&CULTURAL FESTIVAL The Park at Harlinsdale Farm 239 Franklin Road, Franklin www.pilgrimagefestival.com at $219 for general admission as of press time. More information is available at www.pilgrimagefestival.com.

ANEWLEVELOF PUBLICGOLFINFRANKLIN

Sept. 2425

Faster Pace of Play

2nd largest putting green in Tennessee

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Expanded DrivingRange Summer, 2022

Local FAMILY Ownership

Franklin to hold State of the City onMay 11

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theme, “Better Together”, will feature stories about how the city and community have come together to recover from the pandemic, according to the city. “I look forward to the State of the City address every year,” Moore said in a release. “This is our chance to showcase the city departments and our team members. We have one of the best city teams in the country, and this is my opportunity to shine a light on all the great work we’ve accomplished and projects we continue to develop. I hope citizens can take the time to come watch the presentation or tune in on social media to see what we are achieving.” The event will also feature a discussion with City Administra- tor Eric Stuckey, who will give updates on developments and projects throughout the city. For those who do not attend in person, the event will also be livestreamed on the city’s social media channels.

City leaders will convene to talk about local projects, accomplishments and updates from the past year during the 2022 State of the City address. The address will be held May 11 and will feature remarks from Franklin Mayor Ken Moore about how 2021 aected the city and what 2022 will bring. This year’s STATEOF THE CITYADDRESS Rolling Hills Community Church 1810 Columbia Ave., Franklin www.franklintn.gov

May 730

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin & Brentwood

FranklinBOMA rejects rezoning request for Brownland Farm land

FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted 7-0 April 26 to reject a controversial zoning district change that would have cleared the way to develop 233.6 acres of property o Hillsboro Road that is mostly located in the ood plain next to the Harpeth River. “On paper it looks like what they are trying to do is eective,” Franklin Mayor Ken Moore said before the vote. “But I’m concerned if we approve this project we are going to have a whole ood of similar projects with a whole lot of ood plain manipulation.” The board took the vote after a public hearing that lasted more than 2 1/2 hours with more than 60 speakers, most of them nearby residents who opposed the redevelopment of the land because of ooding concerns. The developer, Kevin Estes, sought to rezone Brownland Farm and other adjacent parcels from agricultural and civic institutional classication to a planned unit district to build 356 housing units. The developer’s rezoning proposal had been delayed or deferred several times since last autumn, and the Franklin Municipal Planning Commission

voted 6-2 in February to reject the request. City planning sta had repeatedly recommended denying the request. The farm, which is about 200 acres and located at 1155 Hillsboro Road, has been a major equestrian event hub since the 1950s and is owned and operated by Robin and Michelle Anderton. Residents speaking at the meeting urged the board to heed the city’s own land-use plan, Envision Franklin, which categorized most of the involved land as conservation design concept due to it being situated in the ood plain. District 8 Williamson County Commissioner Barb Sturgeon urged the board to reject the project because engineering studies are only as good as the data used to determine if work would make nearby properties more susceptible to ooding. If the stronger more damaging storms of recent years in Williamson County continue, leaders will be culpable should they approve projects that worsen ooding on Hillsboro Road, Sturgeon said. “I’m afraid this will benet a small number of people and have a devastating eect to the neighbors around it,” Sturgeon said.

Residents commented at a public hearing before the Board of Mayor & Aldermen on April 26.

MARTIN CASSIDYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BROWNLAND FARM A proposed development would have created a new neighborhood on Franklin farmland. • 233.6 acres • 356 housing units

• Updated land zoning • Three miles of trails, parks and a shing pond. SOURCE: CITY OF FRANKLINCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Brentwood approves WindyHill Park study BRENTWOOD The Brentwood City Commission unanimously approved $96,500 at its April 11 meeting to hire ESP Associates Inc. to create a master plan for the design and creation of the 52-acre Windy Hill Park. The Brentwood-based rm will rst evaluate the property and conduct public input sessions before complet- ing the master plan this summer, City Manager Kirk Bednar said. The city purchased the 52 acres of the 90-acre Windy Hill Farm

Franklin to consider updated retiree benets FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen could vote next month to approve a 4.5% cost- Stuckey said the board enacts a cost-of-living increase for retirees almost annually that are in line with ination.

located near Old Smyrna Road for $5.2 million in 2020. “If we’re all in line, we can begin nal construction design this fall, and hopefully begin construction by spring of 2023 and be done in the early part of 2024,” Bednar said. The conditions of the sale of the property limit the city to passive park uses, which could include walking and biking trails but excludes athletic elds. “I’ve heard from so many residents out there about how excited they are about a park in that area, and I think the city is very fortunate,” Commis- sioner Regina Smithson said.

of-living adjustment to monthly payments of municipal retirees to take eect in July. The extra payment is intended to help retirees keep up with ination, City Administrator Eric Stuckey said. Assistant City Administrator Kristine Brock said the resolution is expected to be on the board’s May 10 agenda and would benet 261 retirees in the closed pension fund.

KEEPING UP The city is considering a 4.5% cost-of living adjustment for retirees to take eect in July. First quarter 2022 ination for the Southeast region: 6.5% Cost for year: $312,000 SOURCE: CITY OF FRANKLIN COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Williamson County Schools board votes to reduce out-of-district tuition for teachers’ children WILLIAMSON COUNTY The Williamson County Board of Education voted unanimously April 18 to lower tuition paid by teachers and full-time employees for their children to attend the district’s schools. years two through ve of employment. Williamson Schools Superintendent Jason Golden said the $3,850 tuition rate per family has remained at for seven years. The Williamson Board of Education voted 11-0 to change the per-family tuition fee for out-of- district employees by: TUITION CHANGE

“This adjustment will give immediate relief to all 108 full-time employees who currently choose WCS while living out of county, and it will also set the stage for next year’s discussion in the event a dierent funding model is approved by the [state] legislature,” Golden’s resolution said. The proposal requires approval of the Williamson County Commission.

Under the new rules, the $3,850 fee would be reduced to $2,000 for rst-year full-time employees and would eliminate the tuition for current employees with more than ve years of employment. For employees in their rst ve years with the district, the fee would be lowered 20% a year in

• Reducing the current $3,850 fee to $2,000 • Reducing the fee by 20%annually through ve years of service • Eliminating the fee for employees with ve years of service

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MARTIN CASSIDY

Our Experts, Our Family

QUOTEOFNOTE

2 county commissioners loseMay 3 primaries

Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen will meet May 10 and May 24 at 7 p.m. at 109 Third Ave. S., Franklin. Workshop meetings are at 5 p.m. In-person seating may be limited. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission will meet May 9, May 23 and June 13 at 7 p.m. at 5211 Maryland Way, Brentwood. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education will meet May 16 at 6:30 p.m. at 1320 W. Main St., Franklin. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education will meet May 9 at 6:30 p.m. at 1501 Figuers Drive, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER works, parks, water and planning departments; two Chevy Colorado trucks for the city’s engineering department; and a Chevy Traverse truck for the planning department. The board also voted to reappoint John Magyar as the city’s representative on the Williamson County Board of Equalization for a two-year term ending in May 2024. The board meets annually to hear appeals by property owners on real and personal property valuations, according to City Manager Kirk Bednar. FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted 6-0 April 26 to approve a permit for a Juneteenth celebration in downtown Franklin on June 18. Juneteenth, observed annually June 19, is a holiday that celebrates the end of slavery in the United States. “THERE IS SO MUCH FEAROUT HERE, AND I AMSO EMPATHETIC TO IT.” KEVIN ESTES, A DEVELOPER, SPEAKING APRIL 26 ABOUT FLOODING CONCERNS LINKED TO HIS PROPOSED PROJECT FOR BROWNLAND FARM CITY HIGHLIGHTS BRENTWOOD The Brentwood City Commission voted 7-0 April 11 to buy 24 vehicles from Wilson County Chevrolet Buick GMC for $869,280. The purchase includes 10 Chevy Tahoe trucks for the Brentwood Police Department; 11 Chevy Silverado trucks for the public

WILLIAMSON COUNTY In the May 3 county primaries, two incumbents, Tommy Little and Jerry Rainey, have lost their campaigns to retain seats on the Williamson County Commission, according to unocial election results. In the Republican primary, Little earned 12.4% of the vote while can- didates Greg Sanford and Mary Smith will advance to the Aug. 4 general election. Rainey earned 21.2% as incumbent Barb Sturgeon and Drew Torres won seats on the commission. Republican and Democratic candidates were narrowed down following the primary elections. While some races have been nalized—such as in Districts 2 and 7 where incumbents Judy Lynch Herbert and Elizabeth “Betsy” Hester, and Bert Chalfant and Tom Tunniclie, respectively, are expected to retain their seats—a number of commissioner candidates will advance to the Aug. 4 county general election to square o against candidates from other parties. All results are unocial until canvassed.

ADVANCING CANDIDATES Candidates from the May 3 election will advance to the Aug. 4 general election. The top two candidates in each race will win commission seats.

KEY:

I Independent R Republican D Democrat

District 10 R Meghan Guee* R David Landrum* D Courtenay Rogers

District 1 R Ricky D. Jones*

R Lisa Lenox D LaRhonda Williams District 3 R Je Graves R Jennifer D Matthew Harakas I Daniel Jordan District 4 R Gregg B. Lawrence* R Pete Stresser I Tom Atema District 5 R Mary Smith R Greg Sanford I H. Evan Bledsoe I Michael B. Gallik Moore Mason*

District 11 R Sean R. Aiello* R Brian

INDEPENDENT LIVING ASSISTED LIVING MEMORY CARE surroundings and sense of self within the framework of their unique history. - Jeffr y Gruber, Director of Clinical Services “We construct a comprehensive life story, and once they move in, we validate them by using our knowledge of their life story…That connection and sharing is what ensures a high quality of life.” We use validation techniques to “go into” the sident’s r ali y or “world”. A way of interacting with the resi ent focused on understanding and accepting the resident’s interpretatio of their - Jeff rey Gruber, Director of Clinical Services

Beathard* D Johanna D.

Carter-Haynes

District 12 R Brian Cliord R Steve Smith* D Erin Crawford

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

School board incumbents head toAug. 4 election

WILLIAMSONCOUNTYSCHOOLS Incumbents Eric Welch and Josh Brown are the top Republican candidates in their respective races following the May 3 primary and will head to the Aug. 4 county general election as the race for positions on the Williamson County Schools board of education continues. Welch, who represents District 10, narrowly beat his opponent, Ali Wallace Adair, with 49.82% to her 47.11%, according to unocial results from the Williamson County Election Commission. He will face o against Democratic candidate Jennifer Haile and independent candidates William “Doc” Holladay and Tangie C. Lane in the general election. Brown, who was appointed in October following the departure of former board member Brad Fiscus, earned 57.5% against opponent Elliott Franklin, who received 42.5%. He will face Democratic candidate Robert “Bob” Britton and independent

candidate Del Wright. In the Republican race for District 8, Republican Donna Clements will face independent candidate Ken Chilton; and in District 12, Republican candidate Drason Beasley will face incumbent and WCS board Chair Nancy Nelson Garrett, who is running as an independent. Other school board races were unopposed in the primary election; however, residents will still be able to vote in races for Districts 2 and 6 in the Aug. 4 election.

Call Today! 615.348.4291

Winners from the May 3 election will advance to the county general election. Last day to register to vote: July 5 Early voting: July 1530 Election day: Aug. 4 Important dates

9045 Church Street East Brentwood, TN 37027 HarmonyatBrentwood.com

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • MAY 2022

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY MARTIN CASSIDY

A BIT OF EVERYTHING

Reed’s Produce and Garden Center stocks an array of produce, plants and artisanal specialty foods from Kentucky and around the Southeast United States.

Among the products are:

Hanging oral baskets

Boston, asparagus and macho ferns

Hot sauces

Relishes

Molasses

Tropical plants

Sun-loving owers, such as marigolds, petunias and geraniums

Kentucky Amish country produce, including cantaloupes and sugar baby watermelons

From left: Tracy Reed, Betty Reed and Jesse Reed together run Reed’s Produce and Garden Center in Franklin. (Martin Cassidy/Community Impact Newspaper)

Jesse Reed, at left, and Tracy Reed, at right, examine plants at Reed’s Produce and Garden Center.

Reed’s Produce andGarden Center Family runs country store selling plantings, regional specialty foods O n a recent morning, Tracy and Jesse Reed looked over their outdoor table displays of potted plants of all stripes. Jesse neatened rows of small Boston ferns and shifted some larger hanging plants. “People are still thawing out,” said Tracy, the owner of Reed’s Produce & Garden Center, drive as many as 200 miles in Nashville and rural Tennessee or Kentucky to restock plants, produce and specialty foods he sells. “It can be 4:30 a.m. to 7:30 or 8 p.m. some days,” Tracy said. Sons Jesse and Brent Reed, both in their 20s, manage the store from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., while Tracy’s mother, Betty Reed, works a few hours every day at the register.

Bougainvillea hanging baskets ($29.95) are sold at Reed’s Produce and Garden Center.

commenting on a series of unseasonable overnight chills that had delayed outdoor plantings. “Once the temperature hits 80 degrees, we have people waiting outside for us to open and buying produce all day.” The family-run store has been just outside downtown Franklin at 342 Fourth Ave. N. since 1990. While the Reeds no longer cultivate their own Bradley tomatoes at their Thompson Station farm, every April the garden and produce center opens with an inventory of outdoor decorative owers, ferns, hanging baskets and other plantings. In the store, shoppers can nd regionally produced traditional Southern foods, including black molasses, sorghum, barbecue and hot sauces, relishes and garnishes such as chopped green tomato “chow-chow.” Through the summer, the center stocks fresh produce, including sought-after Bradley, Amish Red and Cherokee Purple tomatoes alongside potatoes, squash and cucumbers, the great majority of it all coming from Amish farmers in Ethridge, Scottsville and other Kentucky towns, Tracy said. Most days from April until autumn, Tracy might

The business began with Tracy’s father, Russell Richard Reed, a native of the Hollow Tree Gap area of Franklin. Together with Betty, Russell Richard cultivated and sold produce out of their car starting in 1971. Being just steps from the Harpeth River, Tracy said the store has ooded often, seeing as much as six feet of water. Joanne Arentson, a Franklin resident said she relies on the store for healthy and well-cared for plants. “The plants are always beautiful and very good quality,” Arentson said. In the fall, the business does a brisk business selling pumpkins and in December sells handmade wreaths of cedar and pine, Tracy said. Tracy said he tries to keep his father’s example of character, hard work and kindness both in business and life. “Enjoy what you do, and work real hard at it, and treat people right, and enjoy life, and you won’t have to worry about anything,” Tracy said. “That’s what he taught me, and that’s what he lived by.”

Spring Valley Farm Toe Jam, Frog Jam and Trac Jam preserves ($6.99) are made in Kentucky.

Reed’s Produce andGarden Center 342 4th Ave. N., Franklin 615-791-7865 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.- 6 p.m., closed Sun.

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