Franklin - Brentwood Edition - October 2020

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 8 | OCT. 13-NOV. 9, 2020

ONLINE AT

PUSHBACK TO ONLINE LEARNING

A LOOK AT VIRTUAL LEARNING

WCS faces online learning issues Tensions rise as parents, teachers work to adapt

“We didn’t signup for home schooling.Wewant tobe online withWilliamson County.” MANDY MOORE, WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS PARENT

IMPACTS

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VOTER GUIDE 2020

BY WENDY STURGES

As the coronavirus pandemic has stretched into another season, so have ten- sions over how school officials are handling virus mitigation. While Williamson County Schools is only through the first grading period of the year, many parents are calling for the district to make changes to how students who chose the district’s online learning program, WCS Online, are receiving instruction. Roughly 6,700 students opted to participate in online learning this semester—not includ- ing any students who have been required to quarantine during the year. The option to attend in-person or online was given to families this summer as part of the district’s reopening framework; how- ever, many parents have said the experi- ence has not been what they expected. A number of parents protested the online learning program in a demonstration Sept. 9. At the event, parents said their children are not receiving instruction from WCS teach- ers, but rather from third-party education vendors, such as Edgenuity. “I thought what we were doing is that we would have Zoom,” WCS parent Mandy Moore said. “They would record the teach- ers in the classes with the kids, live-time, so our children would be doing exactly what those kids are doing. That’s what I thought we were signing up for. We didn’t sign up for home schooling. We want to be online with Williamson County.” CONTINUED ON 16

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Several parents and students held a protest Sept. 9 outside district offices to speak out against the use of third-party platforms for online learning. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

FALL EVENTS

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“Teachers have sacrificed family time, personal time and sleep time in their dedication, and they are rising to the challenges, but they are overwhelmed.” LAURETTE CARLE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT FOR WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS

PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS

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Parents in the district have said that learning platforms are not a replacement for local teachers.

TINY LITTLE DONUTS

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Wendy Sturges

FROMLACY: Did you know that 72% of registered voters in Williamson County cast a ballot in the last presidential election? That number is nearly 30% higher than in a nonpresidential November election. At Community Impact Newspaper , we believe no matter who you vote for, it is important to make your voice heard. Check out our November Voter Guide (see Page 11) for all the information you need to cast your ballot. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Lindsay Scott ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Maureen Sipperley METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Lacy Klasel, lklasel@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

FROMWENDY: The last three months of the year are personally my favorite. As the weather cools down, it feels like the whole community gets to take a breath of fresh air. Take advantage of this time of year to check out some area events on our fall activities guide (see Page 12) for places to pick a pumpkin and area outdoor events to enjoy with your family. Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 6 News, data on local road projects

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

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Local construction CITY& COUNTY Latest local news

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THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

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Local sources

New businesses

Community events

Road projects

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 CoreLife Eatery opened Oct. 1 at 401B Cool Springs Blvd., Ste. 220, Franklin. The eatery oers a selection of healthy meals including salads, grain bowls, soups, entrees and tacos. Vege- tarian and vegan options are available. 615-387-9996. www.corelifeeatery.com 2 Lenders Title Co. held a grand open- ing celebration Sept. 1 for its newest oce location at 149 First Ave. N., Franklin, at Harpeth Square. The company oers title insurance and closing services for home- buyers and sellers as well as title searches, endorsements and title reports. LTC also operates oces in Brentwood, Nashville, Henderson and Smyrna. 615-224-3205. www.lenderstitlegroup.com 3 Panda Express opened in September at 2430 Goose Creek Bypass, Franklin. The fast-casual eatery is known for its orange chicken as well as its beef and shrimp entrees. Takeout, delivery and drive-thru services are open. 626-206-9386. www.pandaexpress.com 4 Izzy’s Feel Good Food opened Oct. 8 in downtown Franklin at 901 Columbia Ave., Franklin. The eatery features a bar and outdoor patio seating as well as takeout. Izzy’s oers loaded fries, salads, sandwiches and entrees. Izzy’s also plans to oer live music. 615-719-2861. www.izzysfranklin.com 5 Well Health Chiropractic opened a new location in Hill Center Brentwood at 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 140, Brentwood, on Oct. 5. The oce oers corrective chiropractic services as well as nutrition 6 Corner Pub is slated to open a new location at 9200 Carothers Parkway, Franklin, in the former location of Franklin Abbey, which announced its closure in Au- gust. The bar and eatery will oer burgers, sandwiches, entrees and appetizers as well as local craft beer and cocktails. An open- ing date for the new location has not yet been announced. www.cornerpubtn.com 7 SpringHill Suites is slated to open in February at McEwen Northside, a 45-acre, counseling. 615-490-3676. www.wellhealthcenters.com COMING SOON

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LACY KLASELCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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mixed-use development located in Cool Springs at McEwen and Aspen Grove drives. The hotel, located at 5011 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin, will feature 150 suites, meeting rooms and a business cen- ter. 615-778-4688. www.marriott.com 8 Owner and chef Nina Singto will open a new location of Thai Esane in Brentwood at 203 Franklin Road, Ste. 100, Brent- wood, in the former location of Nama Su- shi Bar at Hill Center Brentwood. The Thai eatery, which also has a location in Nash- ville, oers specialty dishes inspired by authentic Southeastern Asian cuisine, such as Malaysian noodles, steamed dumplings, larb chicken wraps, papaya salad, Bangkok wings and drunken noodles. Thai Esane is slated to open in January, according to a release. www.thaiesane.com RELOCATION 9 Longtime Brentwood business Sugar Drop will relocate from 7030 Church St. E. to 574 Franklin Road, Franklin, later this year, according to a social media post from the company. The party and baking supply store oers a selection of decorations, sprinkles, baking pans and accessories as well as prepared baked goods such as cakes and cookies. A grand opening for the new location is slated for early November. 629-202-6949. www.sugardrop.com 10 AR Workshop Franklin celebrated its new location at 101 International Drive, Ste. 105, Franklin, with a grand reopening celebration Sept. 29-30. The shop was previously located at 330 Mayeld Drive, Ste. A9, Franklin. The do- it-yourself workshop oers classes and

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Sugar Drop

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WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

events where guests make signs, home decor and other crafts. To-go crafting kits are also available. 615-285-4292. www.arworkshop.com/franklin ANNIVERSARIES 11 The Gardner School of Franklin celebrated its 10th anniversary in Sep- tember. The school, located at 131 Market Exchange Court, Franklin, oers preschool for children ages six weeks to ve years. The school has four locations in the Great- er Nashville area. 615-656-2800. www.thegardnerschool.com NAME CHANGE Franklin Synergy has become FirstBank eective Oct. 11 following a merger with the Nashville-based nancial company

earlier this year. Bank customers will re- ceive notications of any changes to their accounts and will begin using FirstBank platforms beginning Oct. 13, according to the company. www.rstbankonline.com IN THE NEWS 12 Friends of Franklin Parks announced in September it has partnered with The Battle of Franklin Trust to acquire a 2.3- acre parcel of land near Lewisburg Pike and Thompson Alley in Franklin. The land was bought at auction for $107,000, with nancial support from the American Bat- tleeld Trust. The land was part of a Civil War battleeld site and will be preserved and remain undeveloped. www.friendsoranklinparks.org

Franklin Bakehouse is now open in downtown Franklin at Harpeth Square.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Franklin Bakehouse held a grand opening Sept. 26 at 100 E. Main St., Franklin, on the ground level of Harpeth Square. The eatery oers a selection of pastries, breads, snacks and grocery items as well as coee and tea drinks. Franklin Bakehouse also oers breakfast, brunch and lunch menus featuring salads, sandwiches and sides. 615-628-8493. www.franklinbakehouse.com

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS

lane on Hillsboro Road northbound onto Murray Lane in Brentwood. The project will also add a guardrail and traffic signals to the intersection. Construction on the project is slated to be complete by the end of the year; however, signal work may not be complete until next spring. Timeline: estimated to be complete in March 2021 Cost: $836,298 Funding source: TDOT FUTURE PROJECT 3 McEwen Drive improvements The city of Franklin is working toward a project to widen McEwen Drive from a two-lane roadway to a four-lane divided road. The project, which spans from Cool Springs Boulevard to Wilson Pike, will convert the existing roadway into a multiuse trail, add new street lighting and add modifications to the Wilson Pike bridge. City officials estimate the project will take two and a half to three years to complete once construction begins. Timeline: spring 2022-summer 2025 Cost: $34 million Funding source: city of Franklin, federal funds

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1 Highway 96 West multiuse trail The city of Franklin is working to complete a 12-foot-wide multiuse trail on the west side of the city. The project will start at Vera Valley Drive and end at Fifth Avenue North. The project will also include upgrades to gas and water infrastructure. Timeline: July 2020-late 2021 Cost: $4.5 million Funding sources: Tennessee Department of Transportation, city of Franklin, Metro-

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF OCT. 6. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Local construction projects

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Two Town Center is slated to open next year near Rural Plains Circle on the south side of Berry Farms.

FEATURED PROJECT BERRY FARMS TOWN CENTER Work continues at Berry Farms Town Center in Franklin as construction crews aim to complete Two Town Center, a new oce building located near Rural Plains Circle and Berry Farms Crossing. Two Town Center will feature 82,000 square feet of Class A oce space, and it is slated to open in 2021, according to Boyle, the project developer. A new retail building is also under construction near the newly opened Residence Inn by Marriott. Tenants for the building have not been announced. Berry Farms is a master-planned community with three parcels: Town Center, which features retail, restaurants and residential buildings; Reams- Fleming, which is home to the new Ramsey Solutions headquarters; and Chadwell, which has yet to be developed but is slated to include 1,500 residential units as well as oce and retail space.

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH OF NASHVILLE Grace Community Church of Nashville is working to complete Phase 3 of its new campus along Granny White Pike near Old Hickory Boulevard in Brentwood. The new chapel, which will be able to seat 900 when complete, broke ground in July 2019. A completion date has not been announced.

BRENTWOOD POLICE HEADQUARTERS

Work is continuing on the new Brentwood Police Headquarters at Heritage Way on the east side of the city. The 56,000-square-foot facility will allow the police department to move out of its existing space in City Hall. The project is on track to open in spring 2021, according to the city of Brentwood.

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PERFORMING ARTS CENTER AT POPLAR GROVEELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Franklin Special School District broke ground in September on a new Performing Arts Center on the Poplar Grove School campus near Hwy. 96 West in Franklin. The center will have a 485-seat capacity and will feature a full auditorium, a lobby, workspaces and dressing rooms. The center will be available for all schools to use. The district is also adding a 22,800-square-foot gymnasium to Poplar Grove Elementary School. Both projects are expected to be completed in early 2022, according to the district.

Additional retail and residential spaces are also under construction nearby.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

GOVERNMENT

Williamson County has begun the process to see if the image of the Confederate flag can be removed from the county seal. The county forms a task force to determine if there is evidence the seal should be altered. The county authorizes the county mayor to send an application to the Tennessee Historic Commission to seek permission to remove the flag. The THC is set to vote on whether the county can remove the flag from the seal. The county may be allowed to decide how the seal should be altered. SEAL STATUS S

Williamson CountyOKs recommendation to remove Confederate flag fromcounty seal

BY WENDY STURGES

mean lost business for the county and that it is also painful for some residents to see. “The social and public interest section is hard to quantify, but what we did learn is that it doesn’t make the pain any less real that some longtime res- idents feel when they see our county flag,” Largen said. “To those residents who have lived here their entire life, have helped build this community and have raised a family here, the flag is not welcoming. It’s not inclusive, but a symbol of oppression, and is divisive because it has been used by groups like the Ku Klux Klan.” The report from the task force estimates it would cost the county approximately $27,300 to remove the seal from all county properties and another $95,900 to replace the seal with a new one should the county choose to do so. However, this motion does not mean the seal will be changed right away. Now that the resolution has been approved by the board, Williamson County Attorney Jeff Moseley said the county has authorized County Mayor Rogers Anderson to send an application to the Tennessee Historic Commission that asks for

Following weeks of debate and community feed- back, the Williamson County Board of Commission- ers voted 16-7 on Sept. 14 to approve a resolution to accept a recommendation to remove the image of the Confederate flag from the county seal. The seal, which was adopted in 1968, has been the subject of debate in recent months as many residents have called for the removal of Confeder- ate monuments in the area following the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and many other Black Americans in police custody. In July, following a petition signed by thousands of residents, the county board formed a task force to determine if the seal should be altered. The seal depicts the flag and cannon, a schoolhouse, a bible in a church window, and farm animals. The task force focused only on the quadrant with the flag. During the Sept. 14 meeting, members of the task force announced that they had unanimously voted to remove the flag from the seal. The task force is headed by Williamson Inc. President and CEO Matt Largen, who gave a report during the meeting. Largen said the flag could

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

permission to alter the seal. “The only reason the historical commission is involved at all is because the county seal is a piece of art as defined by the statute and contains a memorialization of what is referred to in the statute as ‘the war between the states,’” Moseley said. Following the application, the THC will deliber- ate whether it is within their jurisdiction to allow the county to change the seal, which will require a two-thirds vote of approval. Should the vote fail to pass, the seal could remain as-is. A time frame for when this would occur has not been announced.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin and Brentwood

COMPILED BY BY WENDY STURGES

Williamson County Schools to stop quarantine calls

WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Over the past months as school has been in session, Williamson County Schools has made hundreds of calls to families to let them know to quarantine after coming in contact with a positive coronavirus case. However, WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said during a Sept. 17 school board work session that the district will begin changing how students and sta are notied they need to quarantine after coming in contact with a positive case. As of late September, all notications as to whether an individual needs to isolate or quarantine will come from the county health department. Golden said, previously, the

district would immediately call individuals on behalf of the health department to tell them to self-iso- late pending contract tracing. That call would then be followed by another call from the health depart- ment after they had completed contact tracing work with a nal decision as to whether an individual needs to quarantine. “That will be the nal message from the health department about quarantine—the notice that they have done their contact tracing work and they are making the determi- nation that the individual needs to be quarantined based on the health department’s conclusions related to contact tracing,” Golden said. Golden said the district has been

working to alert individuals as quickly as possible to prevent any potential spread; however, health ocials have said there is a short window of time between when a person comes in contact with a positive case and when they may be able to spread the virus. Golden said the district’s initial response plan was formed because the health department did not feel it was adequately staed to do the amount of contract tracing in the short period of time; however, a recent increase in state funding has allowed the department to hire more tracers. The district will still help with contact tracing, but the health department will have the nal say on who should quarantine.

The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County will host events in 2021. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper) UPCOMING EVENTS Main Street Festival: April 24-25, 2021 Heritage Ball: Oct. 2, 2021 Dickens of a Christmas: Dec. 11-12, 2021 SOURCE: HERITAGE FOUNDATION OF WILLIAMSON

COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Pumpkinfest: Oct. 30, 2021

2021 dates announced for Pumpkinfest, Main Street Festival events FRANKLIN After announcing that all events in 2020 are canceled, the Heritage Foundation of Williamson County announced Aug. 30 it is already working on 2021 events. The nonprot has conrmed that long-running festivals, including the Main Street Festival, Pumpkinfest and Dickens of a Christmas, will be held in person in 2021. Foundation ocials said the HFWC is also working to add virtual elements to each event. “Before we made the hard deci- sion to cancel all 2020 events, we explored a number of new virtual platforms and online experiential components which we are excited to incorporate in 2021 and future festivals,” HFWC CEO Bari Beasley said in an announcement.

Maryland Farms YMCA to close, sell 17-acre property BRENTWOOD The YMCA of Middle Tennessee has announced plans to close the Maryland Farms YMCA on Maryland Way and merge its operations with the Brentwood YMCA on Concord Road. The YMCA is in the process of listing the 17-acre Mary- land Farms property for sale. Proceeds from the sale will be used to complete a multimillion-dollar renovation to the Brentwood YMCA. “The Y intends to keep the Maryland Farms Y open until the renovation and expansion of the Brentwood Y [is complete, which is] tentatively scheduled [for] late 2022,” ocials said in the announcement. The new Brentwood YMCA will feature expanded wellness and exercise areas, additional parking, a youth skate park, an enhanced outdoor aquatics facility and a multipurpose space for regional programs.

The YMCA is in the process of listing the 17-acre Maryland Farms property for sale. (Rendering courtesy YMCA of Middle Tennessee)

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin and Brentwood

COMPILED BY BY WENDY STURGES

NUMBER TOKNOW that had conrmed positive cases of coronavirus as of Oct. 6. However, all 49 schools had some students or sta quarantining after case contact. 34 The number of schools in Williamson County Schools In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least Oct. 30. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets Oct. 13 and 27 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets Oct. 26 and Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets Oct. 19 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets Oct. 19 at 6:30 p.m. at Moore Elementary School at 1061 Lewisburg Pike, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Franklin names new re department chief

Robert Blair selected as board chair for Franklin Special School District

FRANKLIN Glenn Johnson will serve as the city of Franklin’s newest re chief, according to an Oct. 1 announcement. Johnson was

FRANKLIN SPECIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT Following the announcement in early September that Tim Stillings, a member of the Franklin Special School District board, would not volunteer to serve as board chair again, FSSD Board Member Robert Blair was named as the new board chair Sept. 14. Blair, who formerly served as vice chair, has served on the board since 2003, according to FSSD. This year, Blair was inducted into the Tennessee School Boards Associa- tion Scholar Circle. In August, Blair won another term and is expected to serve another four years. Blair has also previously served with local nonprots including Leadership Franklin, My Friends House, WAVES Inc. and Franklin Tomorrow. Additional board ocers include Alicia Barker, who will serve as vice chair; Kevin Townsel, who

will continue to serve as secretary; and Allena Bell, who will con- tinue to serve as treasurer.

Glenn Johnson

Robert Blair

Stillings, who

named following a nationwide search led by the University of Tennessee’s Municipal Advisory Service. About 100 candidates were considered for the role, according to the city. “I have great condence in Chief Johnson’s leadership, dedication, and care for the community and the men and women of the Franklin Fire Department,” City Administrator Eric Stuckey said in a release. Previously, Johnson served as deputy chief. He most recently served as interim re chief following the departure of former Chief Rocky Garzarek, who served with the city from 2004-20.

has served as board chair for the past six years and was rst elected in 1998, announced he would not volunteer as chair following a controversial social media post in September regarding race. “In light of this incident and in light of this past week, it’s time for new leadership,” Stillings said during the meeting. Multiple parents and community members spoke against Stillings’ post during the meeting, calling for more accountability and for Stillings to resign. Those comments have not been addressed by FSSD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for November elections

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

VOTER GUIDE 2020

DATES TOKNOW

WHERE TOVOTE

OCT. 14 First day of early voting OCT. 27 Last day to request an absentee ballot OCT. 29 Last day of early voting NOV. 3 Election Day

Registered voters in Williamson County can cast their ballot at any one of the 25 voting centers in the county. Voting locations can be found at www.williamsoncounty-tn.gov.

SAMPLE BALLOT

EARLY VOTING LOCATIONS

*Incumbent

D Democrat

G Green

I Independent

L Libertarian

R Republican

Registered voters in Williamson County can vote early at any early voting location in the county from Oct. 14-29. There are ve early voting locations in Franklin and Brentwood. FRANKLIN Williamson County Administrative Complex 1320 W. Main St., Franklin Hours: 8 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 17 and 24 Franklin Recreation Complex 1120 Hillsboro Road, Franklin Hours: 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 17 and 24 Williamson County Agricultural Expo Center 4215 Long Lane, Franklin Hours: 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 17 and 24 Cool Springs Conference Center (Marriott Hotel)

I Ronnie Henley I G. Dean Hill I Steven J. Hooper I Aaron James I Elizabeth Mcleod I Kacey Morgan I Eric William Stansberry U.S. representative, District 7

NATIONAL

STATEWIDE State representative, District 61 R Brandon Ogles* I Sam Bledsoe State representative, District 63 R Glen Casada* D Elizabeth Madeira I Bradley Fiscus State representative, District 65

President R Donald J. Trump* D Joseph R. Biden L Jo Jorgensen G Howie Hawkins U.S. Senate R Bill Hagerty D Marquita Bradshaw I Yomi “Fapas” Faparusi Sr. I Jerey Alan Grunau

R Mark E. Green* D Kiran Sreepada I Ronald Brown I Scott Anthony Vieira Jr.

R SamWhitson* D Jennifer Foley

ABSENTEE VOTING

How to cast an absentee ballot 1. Find and ll out an absentee by-mail application from the Tennessee Secretary of State’s Oce website, www.sos.tn.gov. 2. Mail the application before Oct. 27. 3. The Williamson County Election Commission will mail an absentee ballot. 4. Fill out the ballot and return it before polls close on Election Day, Nov. 3. Ballots cannot be hand- delivered to the election oce. They must be mailed.

The state of Tennessee permits registered voters to cast their ballot by mail if they qualify for one of 15 exemptions, including being age 60 or older and being an active member of the military. This year, Tennessee has included an exemption for caretakers of people who have underlying health conditions that may make them more susceptible to COVID-19 or those who would be at greater risk should they contract it. Additionally, registered voters with disabilities that prevent them from lling out a print absentee ballot may request an accessible ballot via email.

700 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin Hours: 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 17 and 24 BRENTWOOD The John P. Holt Brentwood Library 8109 Concord Road, Brentwood Hours: 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 17 and 24

SOURCES: TENNESSEE SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE, WILLIAMSON COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

For more election information, visit communityimpact.com/vote .

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

GUIDE

Fall activities in Franklin, Brentwood

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

Many events in 2020 have been canceled, but residents in Franklin and Brentwood can still nd several fall-themed events during the season that are being held in safe, socially distanced ways.

WORTH THE TRIP

PUMPKIN PATCHES Many farms in Williamson County are oering socially distanced ways for families to pick up pumpkins and take family photos. GENTRY FARM Oct. 01-31 While the farm in Franklin will have safety modications due to the coronavirus pandemic, Gentry Farm is expected to open this season. Visitors will be required to purchase tickets in advance to limit capacity, and activity areas will be modied. Face masks are required when social distancing is not possible. The farm is open Thursday through Sunday until Oct. 31. Visitors can buy a pumpkin, try corn and barn mazes, look at animals and take photos. Tickets will be available in mid-September, according to the farm’s website. 1974 Hwy. 96 W., Franklin. 615-794-4368. www.gentryfarm.com The Cooper Trooper Pumpkin Patch is open through Halloween. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

SEPT. 17 NOV. 01

CHEEKWOODHARVEST CHEEKWOOD ESTATE & GARDENS

NOV. 1926

TURKEY TROT VIRTUAL EVENT

Cheekwood Estate & Gardens will host its annual fall festival beginning in September. The family-friendly exhibit features an autumn garden display, pumpkin patches, fall trees and two life-size pumpkin houses. It will also include special events, including a Virtual Japanese Moon Viewing and a Virtual Día de los Muertos festival. Individual events vary by date. Face masks are required. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Prices vary. 1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville. 615-356-8000. www.cheekwood.org (Courtesy Cheekwood Estate and Gardens)

In lieu of its annual Thanksgiving Day event, Graceworks Ministries Inc. will host its annual Turkey Trot race virtually this year. Runners can sign up for a 10K, 5K and Kids 1K Turkey Chase. Certied routes will be provided for runners to complete between Nov. 19-26. Runners will then upload their run time and a race photo. Proceeds from the event go to provide meals for local families in need. $35. Times and locations vary. www.graceworksministries.net (Courtesy Graceworks Ministries)

17 FALL COLOR HIKE The Owl’s Hill Nature Sanctuary in Brentwood hosts guided walks for adults to admire the changing leaves of the season. Attendees can bring cameras and binoculars. Additional hikes will be hosted on Oct. 24, 31 and Nov. 14. 9:30- 11:30 a.m. $12. 545 Beech Creek Road S., Brentwood. 615-370-4672. www.owlshill.org 17 FALLMOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE CLASS The Williamson County Parks and Recreation Department hosts this “Bob Ross-style” class where students age 13 and older of all skill levels will paint a 12-inch by 16-inch painting using the wet-on-wet method made famous by Bob Ross. Materials will be provided. Noon- 3 p.m. $60. Franklin Recreation Center, 1120 Hillsboro Road, Franklin.

OCTOBER 04 THROUGH 31

• Oct. 18-24: Seasonal shopping: Visit local stores and boutiques • Oct. 25-29: Autumnal treats: Try seasonal treats at restaurants and bakeries • Oct. 30-31: Paint the Town Orange: Weekend Halloween celebration 13 , 20AND 27 WALKING TRAIL TUESDAYS The city of Franklin hosts weekly walks through Franklin parks where residents can take in the sights of the season while safely outdoors. 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Park locations vary by week. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov. 16 AND 23 SPOOKYMOVIES IN THE PARK McEwen Northside will host two fall movie nights in October featuring spooky, family-friendly movies. Attendees should bring their own lawn chairs to set up in the park. Movie titles had not been announced as of press time. 6:30-10 p.m. Free. 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Franklin. 615-550-5575. www.facebook.com/ mcewennorthside

PAINT THE TOWNORANGE The Heritage Foundation of Williamson County, the city of Franklin and Visit Franklin will host a new event in downtown Franklin to celebrate the fall season in place of Pumpkinfest, which was canceled earlier this year. Each week in October will have a theme and activities with shops in downtown Franklin participating. The event will also feature the HFWC’s annual pumpkin tree as well as decorations in local store windows. Visitors to the event are invited to tag seles and photos of events with #downtownfranklintn and #franklintn. Free; costs vary for restaurant and pub crawls. Downtown Franklin. www.williamsonheritage.org Themed weeks include: • Oct. 11-17: Bountiful Brews: Octoberfest-themed pub crawls and restaurant specials

COOPER TROOPER PUMPKIN PATCH Oct. 05-31

The annual pumpkin patch is set up at the corner of Cool Springs Boulevard and Mallory Lane in Cool Springs. All prot proceeds go to the Cooper Trooper Foundation to support pediatric cancer research through the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. Customers should wear masks and practice social distancing. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (Mon.-Fri.), 9 a.m.- 8 p.m. (Sat.), 10 a.m.-7 p.m. (Sun.). 530 Cool Springs Blvd., Franklin (in front of Walgreens). www.coopertrooper.org

615-790-5719, ext. 2020. www.wcparksandrec.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Play It Again Sports

Brentwood shop pivots inventory in pandemic F or those who are returning to sports this fall or wanting to get into shape at home, Play it Again Sports in Brentwood oers a wide range of sporting goods to help athletes gear up. Owners Brent and Cynthia Wenger took over ownership of Play It Again Sports in March 2019 and have since turned the store into a one-stop shop for the sports that residents care about most. “We’re family-owned and family-operated,” Cynthia Wenger said. “We live in this area—it’s very, very family-focused. Our daughter works here. When people come in, they’re not talking to a cor- porate [company], and I think that’s kind of cool.” Play It Again Sports oers a wide variety of sports equipment and accessories for youth and adults, from their wall of hockey skates and sticks to golf gear. The store oers new and gently used goods, a more price-friendly option for parents of athletes that often outgrow equipment quickly, Wenger said. “Skates are really expensive and if they can nd something that’s used—what a great way to save money and continue to do something you love,” Wenger said. The store also carries home gym equipment, which has become very popular as people are choosing to work out at home as opposed to a public gym, she said. “Home gym and tness is a huge, huge focus right now, and [we’re] just making sure that people have what they need,” she said. The shop has also recently stocked its inventory of bicycles, which have been hard to nd during the pandemic, she said. Wenger said the store has also made modications, including strongly encourag- ing customers to wear masks inside the store and oering curbside services. “I think the most interesting thing has just been pivoting and saying, ‘This is what we used to do, and this is what we have to do now,’” she said. Play It Again Sports has also begun carrying special safety equipment, such as face shields, as sports have resumed under new coronavirus- related regulations. The business has worked to get involved in the community, Wenger said. In addition to sponsoring local school events, the store is one of the sponsors for the upcoming Graceworks Ministries Inc. Turkey Trot and will hold an event Dec. 1 for Tennessee Kids Belong, an organization that assists foster families. “I like that aspect of it, just getting to know the people that are local and getting involved in their lives in meaningful ways,” Wenger said. BY WENDY STURGES

Brent and Cynthia Wenger took over ownership of Play It Again Sports in Brentwood on Mallory Lane in March 2019. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

The store oers a wide selection of new and gently used equipment and gear for a variety of sports.

Home gym equipment, such as weights and machines, is also available.

SELL SPORTS EQUIPMENT INSTORE Play It Again Sports oers a program through which customers can sell gently used sporting equipment for cash or store credit. SELLING REQUIREMENTS

CREDIT RATES

Cash: Customers get 30% of the item’s sale price if they choose the cash option. Store credit: Customers will get 40% of the item’s sale price in credit to spend in the store. Consignment: Customers will get 50% of the item’s sell price if sold on consignment. This option is only for large items, such as gym equipment.

Items should be clean and unbroken. Items should still be in line with current safety certications. For large items, such as gym equipment, email photos of the item before bringing to the store.

Play It Again Sports 1701 Mallory Lane, Brentwood 615-661-1107

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www.playitagainsportsbrentwood.com www.facebook.com/playitagainbrentwood Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

DINING FEATURE

BY WENDY STURGES

FLAVOR OPTIONS tiny little donuts oers several year-round and seasonal avors to add to plain doughnuts.

YEARROUND • Cinnamon sugar • Classic glazed • Powdered sugar • Fresh lemon glaze • Dark chocolate drizzled • Maple glaze

SEASONAL AND SPECIALTY • Pumpkin pie spice • Maple glaze with Applewood-smoked bacon pieces • Chocolate with peppermint bits • Sprinkles

Owner Mark Mogul and his wife, Tammy, opened the rst tiny little donuts location in 2018.

PICKA PACKAGE Customers at tiny little donuts can choose from large and small packages to enjoy. TINY LITTLE BOX $7 A box of a “generous dozen” with 14-15 small doughnuts in one avor option. BOXOF 100 $45 A box of 100 small doughnuts that can be customized with up to ve avor options. Customers should call ahead to order.

tiny little donuts serves miniature doughnuts made fresh daily with optional avors. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

The doughnuts are made inside a remodeled Airstream trailer.

tiny little donuts Franklin doughnut spot focuses on small pleasures W hen owners Mark and Tammy Mogul set out to move to Nashville from South Car- olina three years ago, they only made it as

they came in. If they’re having a rough day, they come in, they get their doughnuts with a smile.” The eatery’s doughnuts are available in either a “generous dozen” box, which includes 14-15 small doughnuts, or in a box of 100, which customers can customize with up to ve avors, Mogul said. Flavors—including lemon glaze, dark chocolate and the most popular, cinnamon sugar—are made in-house with fresh, all-natural ingredients. The couple opened the rst location of tiny little donuts near downtown Franklin in March 2018 and expanded to add a second Airstream location in February 2020, just weeks before the coronavirus pandemic hit the region. Both locations closed for nine weeks before reopening in mid-May. Mogul said the business’ customer base has stayed loyal in the past several months and has helped them stay aoat in a dicult year for small businesses. “We’ve been really fortunate. We feel blessed because all of our customer base has rallied around us and are still buying doughnuts from us. We’re seeing—every week, our sales are going back up,” he said. “We’re nowhere near where we should be, but I see that we will get there, and I think it’s because we’ve been really cautious.” The eatery has also worked over the past several months to help in the community by donating doughnuts to rst responders and health care workers as well as to local teachers. “We feel really blessed in the community, and we try really hard to be part of the community,” Mogul said. “We donate tons of doughnuts to schools, churches, all the rst responders: re department, police. We’re thankful for all that they do, espe- cially in the current environment we’re in today.”

far as Franklin before deciding to put down roots. After the couple retired from their respective careers—he, a professional tennis player, and she, a health coach—they knew they wanted to start a business and soon found inspiration when Mark said they came across a machine at a tournament that made hot, bite-size doughnuts. “We decided we wanted to try something that would be fun and enjoyable for us,” Mark Mogul said. “I’ve always had an anity for Airstreams, and in conversation one day, Tammy came up with this idea to put a doughnut machine in an Air- stream and turn it into a tiny little doughnut shop.” From there, the Moguls spent six months outtting an Airstream trailer with a kitchen and service counter and began cranking out dozens of small doughnuts. Mogul said while the couple believes everything should be enjoyed in moderation, doughnuts can be a small treat to brighten someone’s day. “It’s a simple pleasure; it’s not rocket science,” he said. “We’re making tiny little doughnuts that people like. We want our customers to leave feeling better about us and about themselves than when “IT’S A SIMPLE PLEASURE. IT’S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE. WE’REMAKING TINY LITTLE DOUGHNUTS THAT PEOPLE LIKE.” MARK MOGUL, OWNER OF TINY LITTLE DONUTS

The eatery has two locations in Franklin, on Fifth Avenue North and Murfreesboro Road.

tiny little donuts A 328 Fifth Ave., N, Franklin 615-679-9422 B 1203 Murfreesboro Road, Franklin 615-224-3179 www.tinylittledonuts.com

Hours: Tue.-Sat. 7 a.m.-1 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.-1 p.m., closed Mon. (locations may close early if sold out)

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