Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | February 2021

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

VOLUME 8, ISSUE 6  FEB. 10MARCH 10, 2021

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IF SOMEONEWAS BREAKING INTOYOURHOME, WOULD IT MATTER TOYOU IF ITWAS A CONSTABLE THAT GOT THERE FIRST ORA SHERIFF’S DEPUTY? ERIC FAGAN, FORT BEND COUNTY SHERIFF

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Sheri’s reversal of 2019 dispatch policy brings relief to Fort Bend County ocials

Phase 2 improvements, which are predicted to take until the end of the year to complete, include the additions ofmultiple trails, the extension of the park’s entry road and additional parking. (Claire Shoop/Community Impact Newspaper)

As attendance increases, Cullinan Park begins improvements

BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

Fort Bend County Sheri Eric Fagan entered oce Jan. 1 with several priorities in mind—including a mis- sion to reverse a 2019 policy regarding emergency dis- patch practices, which he accomplished in week one. For decades, Fort Bend County dispatchers answer- ing 911 calls for an unincorporated area would send the closest law enforcement ocial—whether from the sheri’s oce or a constable’s oce—to the scene. On Jan. 1, 2019, however, former Sheri Troy Nehls changed the policy, directing dispatchers to send only sheri deputies to calls even if a constable unit was closer and under contract to patrol a specic area. The policy—which stayed in eect until Fagan’s CONTINUED ON 16

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

parks are more traditional parks that have ball elds, playgrounds, that type of thing, but this is a nature park, and you can walk out ve minutes and feel like you’re nowhere near the city.” Innovative improvements Fenglin Du, the parks development manager for the city of Sugar Land, said the 754-acre park is gov- erned by a series of partnerships between the city of Sugar Land, the city of Houston and the CullinanPark Conservancy. Five years ago, the city of Sugar Land annexed

The Cullinan Park Conservancy and the city of Sugar Land have kick-started capital improvements to Joseph S. and Lucie H. Cullinan Park, which had sat tucked o Hwy. 6 in Sugar Land for nearly 30 years without any new developments. These recent improvements and those planned for 2021 as well as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic have led many people to discover Cullinan Park for the rst time, Cullinan Park Conservancy President RobbinMallett said. “There’s a lot of great parks in Sugar Land, but this is a nature park,” Mallett said. “Most of the other

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TxDOT to add medians along FM1092

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: I bet many of you didn’t know about the wonderful park right next to the airport over on Hwy. 6. Cullinan Park, which is open to the public, features a small lake for shing, walking trails and—I’m told—some of the best birding in the county. Check out our lead story to learn more. Amy Martinez, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMLAURA: In this issue, we got to know the new sheri in town as we looked into the details of a recent emergency dispatching system policy reversal in Fort Bend County. Laura Aebi, EDITOR

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

The national home improvement and maintenance company TruBlue Total House Care launched a franchise serving Sugar Land, New Territory, First Colony, Great- wood and the surrounding areas in early January. Operated by Scott and Jennifer Long, TruBlue of Sugar Land provides handyman repairs, cleaning services, sea- sonal services, yard work and minor home renovations. The company also oers a line of senior-focused services, such as making age-related adaptions to a property and property maintenance. 281-816-7300. www.trubluehousecare.com/sugarland Missouri City resident Charlie Stapleton launched a franchise of Abrakadoodle , an art education business, which will serve Sugar Land, Missouri City, Meadows Place, Staord and Pearland, on Jan. 1. Abraka- doodle oers visual arts classes, camps, workshops, in-school eld trips, special events and parties. 832-679-3238. 7 Crawsh Bistro will open a location at 9340 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City, in mid-February. The restaurant’s fresh seafood oerings will be inuenced by Asian avors. The menu includes a variety of seafood dishes, including steamed dungeness crab, black pepper crab and poke. 832-440-0013. 8 Premier Martial Arts will open a loca- tion at 8035 Hwy. 6, Ste. 120, Missouri City, by late spring. The nationwide franchise oers karate programs for children age 3 and up as well as kickboxing and krav maga training for adults. It also hosts karate- focused birthday parties. Currently, the studio has a dozen Houston-area locations. 281-560-3085. www.premiermartialarts.com www.abrakadoodle.com COMING SOON 9 Hummingbird Montessori School , a preschool for children ages 6 weeks to 6 years, expects to open at the Shops in Riverstone shopping center in late spring. Located at 17018 University Blvd., Sugar Land, the authentic Montessori school is infused with traditional aspects and a play-based after-school program. They oer four classrooms: infant, toddler, pre-primary and primary. 832-857-4190. www.myhummingbirdschool.com

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NOWOPEN 1 Woles Restaurants and Sports Bars opened its fth Houston-area location Jan. 23 at 2329 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land. The restau- rant serves appetizers, sandwiches, wraps, wings, seafood platters, steaks and more alongside a variety of alcoholic beverages. 281-980-0009. www.woles.com 2 Foodology Eatery opened Jan. 12 at 10581 S. Hwy. 6, Ste. 101, Sugar Land. The restaurant serves American food, including breakfast and brunch. 346-418-6457

3 Wonderfully Made Pediatrics is now seeing patients at 8035 Hwy. 6, Ste. 100, Missouri City. The pediatric wellness center opened Oct. 26 and serves patients up to age 21. 832-930-7756. www.wmpedi.com 4 Messina Hof Harvest GreenWinery & Kitchen has opened their dining room at 8921 Harlem Road, Richmond. The full-ser- vice restaurant includes a tap room with 24 oerings. In the coming weeks, the winery will host a series of socially distanced grand opening events, including tours and

5 Creole Flava , a food truck located at 9907 S. Hwy. 6, Sugar Land, opened Dec. 20. Owned by Sheila McKenzie, the food truck serves home-cooked Cajun Creole soul food, such as gumbo, jambalaya, chicken and gravy, collard greens, macaroni and cheese, and cornbread. 832-633-4914. www.creoleava.com 6 Jason Deitz State Farm opened at 16803 W. Airport Blvd., Ste. 120, Richmond, on Jan. 4. The insurance agency oers auto, home and life insurance as well as other nancial services. 832-532-3313. www.jasonprotects.us

tastings. 346-292-9463. www.messinahog.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

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Foodology Eatery

Premier Martial Arts

COURTESY FOODOLOGY EATERY

COURTESY PREMIER MARTIAL ARTS

Seismique features 9 million LED lights and 111 projectors.

10 Gyro King is opening a location at 2857 Town Center Blvd. N., Sugar Land, in mid-February. The halal restaurant will oer more than a half dozen varies of gyro meat served on a pita, rice platter or salad as well as sides including hummus and pita, fries and falafel. It also oers a juice bar with a variety of options. Gyro King has ve other Houston-area locations. www.gyroking.com 11 KB’s Hot Chicken is coming to the former Sleek Chocolate & Cafe location at 636 Hwy. 6, Ste. 500, Sugar Land, in early March. The restaurant will serve halal Nashville-style hot chicken and oer hot chicken sandwiches, tenders and chicken platters. www.facebook.com/kbshotchicken 12 Imagine Early Education and Child- care will open a center at 5320 Hwy. 6, Missouri City, in late spring, according to the business’s main oce. Imagine oers child care, learning and extracurricular opportunities for children ages 6 weeks-12 years. There are several other Imagine Early Education & Childcare centers located in the Houston area. 833-742-4453. www.imaginechild.com 13 Bounce Bounce Trampoline Park has delayed opening its Missouri City location from summer 2020 to summer 2021 due in part to the coronavirus pandemic. Located at 9710 Hwy. 6, Missouri City, the indoor activity park will feature wall-to-wall tram- polines as well as trampoline sports courts, a foam pit, a zip line and other attractions. Visitors of all ages and tness levels are welcome. Activities include trampoline dodgeball, trampoline basketball, tness classes and more. Bounce Bounce has one other location in Cypress. 281-246-4460. www.bouncebouncepark.com

14 A Life Time location is under con- struction at 8421 Hwy. 6, Missouri City. It is expected to open in mid- to late 2022 and will feature exercise equipment, tness classes, indoor gyms and an outdoor pool as well as a LifeCafe restaurant and LifeSpa salon. www.lifetime.life 15 Interior construction is ongoing for a new Papa John’s location in the Univer- sity Commons shopping center expected to open in early spring. Located at 13582 University Blvd., Ste. 300, Sugar Land, the franchise oers a variety of pizza, sides and desserts. www.papajohns.com SCHOOL NOTES 16 Construction on projects to rebuild two Fort Bend ISD elementary schools is underway, according to a Jan. 11 presen- tation by Chief Operations Ocer Oscar Perez. A Meadows Elementary School is 95% complete and is expected to reopen for students in March. Meanwhile, demolition is completed and construction is 8% nished at B Lakeview Elementary School . The district estimates the project will be mostly complete by October with students returning to the building in January 2022. www.fortbendisd.com ANNIVERSARIES 17 T. L. See Vision , located at 12919 W. Bellfort Blvd., Sugar Land, celebrated its rst anniversary Jan. 21. The family optom- etry practice serves patients age 3 and up for routine eye exams and oers treatment for age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and more. 281-662-0551. https://tlseevision.business.site

COURTESY SEISMIQUE

WORTH THE TRIP NOWOPEN Seismique, a technology-fueled experiential art museum, opened at 2306 S. Hwy. 6, Houston, on Dec. 26. With more than 40 dierent galleries created by 65 artists and crafters, the museum’s exhibits explore topics such as extraterrestrial beings, articial intelligence, immersive experiences, gamication and more. Seismique’s mission, in part, is to support local artists, and to that goal, the museum reserved 12 of the galleries for Houston-based artists. Furthermore, the museum hopes to serve as an educational experience for local schools looking for technology-driven learning opportunities. “I am really looking forward to seeing the expressions on peoples’ faces when they experience Seismique for the rst time—I liken it to the equivalent of walking through a portal and into an alternative universe that is a feast for the senses,” 18 Spenga , a nationwide tness fran- chise, is celebrating its rst anniversary Feb. 28 at 13540 University Blvd., Sugar Land. Spenga’s multisensory workouts incorporate 20 minutes of spin, 20 minutes of strength training and 20 minutes of yoga in workouts designed to improve endur- ance, strength, cardiovascular health and exibility. 832-241-7676. https://spenga.com

Seismique creator Steve Kopelman said. “This year has been exceedingly dicult for the whole world, and we want Seismique to serve as something of a pandemic panacea—a place where visitors can transport themselves to another realm and nd creative inspiration through the artistic manifestation of 40 dierent exhibits.” Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, Seismique is operating at limited capacity and requiring masks. 346-202-6006. www.seismique.com

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RENOVATIONS 19 Los Gallitos Mexican Cafe reopened Jan. 2 at 3385 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land, follow- ing the completion of roof renovations. The Mexican restaurant serves a variety of appetizers and entrees, such as fajitas, quesadillas, chimichangas and burritos. 281-313-1401. www.mygallitos.com

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY CLAIRE SHOOP

TxDOT to addmedians along FM1092 inMissouri City

SAFETYFIRST FM 1092 has a higher average yearly crash rate from 2015- 19 than the statewide average for farm-to-market roads, according to TxDOT. TxDOT aims to reduce these numbers by limiting the number of left turns on FM 1092.

In order to improve movement of trac and reduce collisions along FM 1092 inMissouri City, the Texas Department of Transportation plans to add a median to separate the six lanes of trac, limiting left turns. FM 1092, also known as Murphy Road, has seen increased use due to new developments in Riverstone and Sienna, said Shashi Kumar, Missouri City public works director. “This roadway has transformedmore from a farm-to-market roadway to a major mover of trac,” Kumar said at a Missouri City City Council meeting. TxDOT plans to install a median on 5.8miles of FM 1092 fromHwy. 59 to Hwy. 6. In addition to Missouri City, portions of the project are located in Staord and Houston, Kumar said. Construction for the $4million project is anticipated to bid in April and will take sevenmonths to complete.

Prior to the plannedmedians, most segments of FM 1092 are six lanes—three northbound and three southbound—with a center turn lane. Crash rates for the corridor are between 28%-98% higher than the state average for farm-to-market roads, depending on which segment of FM 1092 is considered, according to a TxDOT video on the project. It said adding a median will limit left turns and reduce safety risks. Still, Assistant City Engineer Jeremy Davis said Missouri City has heard concerns frombusinesses owners who feel a median will restrict accessibility to business driveways. According to TxDOT, FM 1092 driveway density reaches up to 72 driveways per mile. “We have to do something; there is not another option,” Kumar said. “The do-nothing option is not an option.”

CRASH COUNT YEARLY AVERAGE 201519

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SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *EACH SEGMENT AND STATEWIDE CRASH RATE IS CALCULATED AS A RATIO OF THE NUMBER OF CRASHES PER 100 MILLION VEHICLE MILES TRAVELED.

UPCOMING PROJECTS

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Sienna Parkway intersection improvements

Soldiers Field extension Construction on the project to connect the existing Soldiers Field Drive to Hwy. 6 and improve First Colony Boulevard in Sugar Land is expected to begin in scal year 2021-22 following the completion of the Hwy. 6 road widening project, according to the city of Sugar Land. The design for the upcoming project is nearly complete. Timeline: scal year 2021-22 Cost: $2.46 million Funding source: city of Sugar Land

Knight Road extension The timeline to extend a portion of Knight Road so it connects from the Fort Bend Parkway Toll Road to McKeever Road in Missouri City has been delayed. The city is in the process of acquiring three parcels of land under eminent domain. Once completed, the road will give residents in the Sienna area an additional way to reach Hwy. 6. Timeline: fall 2021-spring 2022 Cost: $8 million Funding sources: city of Missouri City, Fort Bend County

University Boulevard widening The design phase for a project to widen University Boulevard from four to six lanes from Telfair Avenue to just south of Lexington Boulevard is anticipated to begin in March, according to the city of Sugar Land. Construction on the project, which is part of the city’s master thoroughfare plan to enhance mobility and safety, will take place in scal year 2022-23. Timeline: scal year 2022-23 Cost: $1.7 million Funding source: city of Sugar Land

A project to improve intersections along Sienna Parkway is moving into the design phase. The series of turn lane additions and other improvements will be located at the intersections of Hwy. 6, Trammel Fresno Road, Sienna Springs Drive, Watts Plantation Road, Sienna Ranch Road and McKeever Road. Timeline: fall 2021-22 Cost: $5.2 million Funding sources: Sienna Management District, Fort Bend County

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JAN. 22. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

DINING

BY MORGAN THEOPHIL

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FOUR CROWD FAVORITES: 1. Cactus Jack (vegan): Grilled jackfruit marinated in jerk sauce, topped with red cabbage, plantain chips, guacamole and a signature trill sauce served on a our tortilla ($4.29) 2. Thee Stallion: Marinated grilled steak served with onions, mixed cheese, cilantro and pico de gallo, draped in a signature trill sauce served on a our tortilla ($3.79) 3. Screwed Up Chicken: Tender grilled curry chicken with onions, shredded lettuce, mixed cheese, pico de gallo draped in a signature trill sauce served on a our tortilla ($3.29) 4. The Bun-B: Seasoned ground beef, draped in mixed cheese, lettuce, pico de gallo, and a signature trill sauce served on a our tortilla ($2.99)

Houston-area native Samuel Sykes opened Trill Taco in 2019. (Photos courtesy Samuel Sykes)

Trill Taco Houston-themed taco restaurant ties nontraditional menu to area rap scene I t is impossible to pick a dish o the menu at Trill Taco without thinking about Houston’s renowned hip-hop scene.

Sykes said. Hip-hop duo UGK, which featured rappers Pimp C and Bun B, coined the term in the ‘90s, he said, and it quickly became a staple of Houston culture. Though it unfortunately came after a tragedy, Sykes said being a Black-owned business has played a role in the restaurant’s success. After George Floyd was killed in the custody of the Minneapolis Police Department last May, Sykes said he saw the community band together and support Black-owned businesses. “When the tragic events of George Floyd happened, the accent of our community was to support each other,” he said. “That’s where I saw my numbers triple.” Sykes said Trill Taco would not be a reality without his mother,

Patricia Sykes. When the oppor- tunity presented itself to open the restaurant, the two put their skills and talents together to make it happen. “I built the body and the brand, and she’s the heart and soul,” Sykes said. “She’s the cook, the chef and the most important part of the business for sure.” Down the road, Sykes hopes to open several Trill Taco locations throughout the Houston area and eventually throughout Texas. For now, he is working to increase the restaurant’s brand awareness and add new dishes and drinks to the menu to keep the restaurant’s regular customers coming back. “We want to keep on growing,” he said.

Trill Taco 2887 Dulles Ave., Missouri City 281-656-9679 www.trilltacomissouricity.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 11:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Closed Sun.

For example, the rst menu item—a our tortilla taco with “immaculately seasoned” ground beef draped in mixed cheese, lettuce, pico de gallo and a signature sauce—is named after Houston-born rapper Bun B. “We’re not traditional,” Trill Taco owner Samuel Sykes said. “That’s what we wanted to do from the beginning: As far as our menu and our restaurant in general, we wanted tomake sure we were dierent from everyone else.” The 27-year-old Houston-area native opened Trill Taco in 2019. “Trill” in the restaurant’s name comes from ‘90s hip-hop culture,

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE Linda Coleman Branch president, Missouri City and Vicinity NAACP In 2020, the death of George Floyd and other Black Americans in police custody sparked a nationwide movement for racial justice. In observance of Black History Month, Community Impact Newspaper spoke with Linda Coleman, the president of the Missouri City and Vicinity NAACP branch, who reected on 2020 and looked ahead to the organization’s goals for 2021. The Missouri City and Vicinity branch, which serves the entirety of Fort Bend County, was founded in 1986 and is currently made up of just under 200 members. Answers have been lightly edited for length and clarity.

BY CLAIRE SHOOP

ORIGINS OF THE ORGANIZATION The NAACP was founded Feb. 12, 1909, in New York City by a group of Black and white citizens committed to righting social injustices, according to the organization’s website. Branches nationwide in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Japan andGermany 2.2K The year the Missouri City and VicinityNAACP branchwas founded 1986

Total members

TELLME A LITTLEMORE ABOUT THEWORKOF THE MISSOURI CITY AND VICINITY NAACP BRANCH. For the Missouri City and Vicinity branch as a unit, our objectives, purpose andmission are exactly the same as national. The vision is to ensure the society in which we live has equal rights for everyone, without discrimination based on race. That’s the entire vision. When it comes to Black people we have issues in just about every area, actually. That includes economics, education, health, public safety, criminal justice, voting rights—it includes all of that. We work on ensuring discrimination is limited by addressing these issues through advocacy, mediation, legislation and litigation. WHEN YOU REFLECT ON 2020 AND THEMOVEMENT FOR RACIAL JUSTICE THAT TOOK PLACE LAST YEAR, WHAT STANDS OUT TO YOU? What happened in 2020 with race relations and police brutality was awful, but the NAACP and Black citi- zens are not unfamiliar with that kind

of death and brutality. I think it was a wake-up call for the rest of America and the world to see such brutality right in your face on television. That is how the NAACP began— with hangings and lynchings—and moving forward, it is the same. But I amhopeful that it will change because I think the whole country is looking at some type of criminal jus- tice reform that will prevent another case of George Floyd. HOWHAS THE PANDEMIC WORSENED SOME OF THE ECONOMIC CHALLENGES FAC ING THE BLACK COMMUNITY? Well it has been very dicult for a lot of Black-owned businesses to stay in business because it’s a matter of money; it’s a matter of patrons. A lot of the businesses require people to come into the building to receive a service. Since the pandemic, that has been very limited, so of course businesses are failing, or they are very limited in their ability to provide their service or product. What we try to do is to keep the community informed of any and all monies that will help them keep

their businesses aoat. We have an economic development committee who is working on that. WHAT ARE YOUR ORGANIZA TION’S TOP THREE GOALS FOR 2021? Right now, number one is health. We’re concerned about COVID-19 and vaccines. We are working on putting as much information out as we can to encourage all African American citizens to take the vaccine. We have been doing our research, and we declared that it is safe for us to take the vaccine. Nowwe need to make sure our citizens can get the vaccine. The second thing is criminal justice reform as well as any and all matters that concern our community regarding discrimination and racism. That’s going to be always parallel with criminal justice reform. Third, we are expanding our pres- ence throughout Fort Bend County. We’re working on membership and funding because we too lost a lot of funding for the programs that we had. The pandemic limited our ability to do what we were used to doing.

worldwide 500K

ISSUES:

Criminal justice

Civic engagement

Economic opportunity

Education

Environmental justice

Health

Media diversity

SOURCE: NAACPCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FEB 8-13 I N- STORE & ONL I NE

*Valentine's Gifts Sale runs 2/8/21-2/13/21. Valid on featured products. Sale items can be shopped in-store and online at www.twinliquors.com. Selection varies by store. Items and prices subject to change without notice. No further discount on Sale Items, Final Few, or Closeouts. Some exclusions apply. Please drink responsibly.

ON SELECT WI NES , SPARKL I NG , AND SP I R I TS *

COMPL I MENTARY G I FT WRAP . DEL I VERED R I GHT TO YOUR SPEC I AL SOMEONE !

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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

PUT WELLNESS BACK IN YOUR ROUTINE

PUBL Com INSE 12/0 MAT 12/0 JOB MHH Adve CLIE Mem JOB GI Lo LIVE N/A SIZE 9.183 BLEE N/A COLO 4cp/ SWO FORM Pres

IS IT TIME FOR A DIGESTIVE HEALTH SCREENING?

Regular checkups are the key to long-term health. Checkups allow doctors to screen for digestive health issues and diseases that can become life-threatening if they go undiagnosed—like colon cancer. Experts recommend you start screening for colon cancer at age 45* or even earlier if you have a family history. There are many screening tests for colon cancer, including at-home tests as well as procedures like colonoscopy. And with our Safe Wait ™ enhanced safety measures in place at all of our facilities, you can get the care you need with peace of mind, so there’s no reason to put it off. Connect with a physician or schedule your screening today at memorialhermann.org/mhmg *Due to recent changes in screening recommendations, please consult your insurance provider to confirm coverage if you are under age 50.

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

12

11/30/20 1:43 PM COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

MH_GI-LowRisk_CI_9.1837x11.25 C.indd 1

LICATION: mmunity Impact ERTION: 09/20 TERIALS DUE: 04/20 NUMBER: H-2020 ertising-Nov ENT: morial Hermann NAME: ow Risk Ad E: E: 37” x 11.25” ED: ORS: /0; 150 ls; OP MAT: ss Ready PDF

MAKE A RESOLUTION FOR GOOD HEALTH IN 2021 IT’S TIME TO CATCH UP ON WELL CHECKS AND PREVENTIVE CARE

A Screening Timeline for Adults Which health screenings do you need? Timing varies depending on your family history and other risk factors. Talk with your primary care physician to determine which tests are right for you, and at what age you should begin. Here is a list of common screenings: Every year* • Annual physical exam/wellness visit • Blood pressure screening

Knowing your BMI Maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of preventing or managing diabetes. Body mass index (BMI), the ratio of your weight to your height, is a helpful calculation. If your BMI is above normal, youmay bemore likely to develop health complications, including diabetes. Breast Cancer Screening Screeningmammograms are important tools for detecting breast cancer. “If you have been having regular, annual screening mammograms, delaying for a couple of months is usually okay,” says Dr. Nguyen. “However, if you have a high risk of cancer, you should not postpone your annual screening mammogram.” Colon Cancer Screening Colon cancer is one of the most curable cancers if caught early, according toMemorialHermannMedicalGroupgastroenterologist Nadim Jafri, MD. “All people should get their first colonoscopy around ages 45-50, and sooner for those at higher risk due to ethnicity or family history,” says Dr. Jafri. If you have symptoms such as blood in your stool, a recent change in bowel habits or unexplainedweight loss, Dr. Jafri recommends seeing your healthcare provider as soon as possible. Early Detection for Prostate Cancer “Prostate cancer often goes undiscovered until it becomes advanced,” says Memorial Hermann Medical Group urologist Kyle Keyes, MD. A routine blood test measures the amount of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the blood. Higher levels of PSA may indicate prostate cancer.The earlier it is identified, themore options there are for treatment. With SafeWait™ enhanced safetymeasures atMemorial Hermann locations, you can get the care you need with peace of mind. As the pandemic continues, one of the biggest lessons being learned is thatmaking an effort to stay healthy is one of themost important things you can do for yourself and your family.

The new year brings a fresh start, a renewed sense of hope and if you’re likemany people, a handful of resolutions. Some resolutions are tough to keep, but one of the most important promises you can make is the promise to focus on your health. During thepandemic,manypeople let healthyhabits slip.Memorial HermannMedical Groupphysicians remindus that earlydetection can save lives. Regular checkups and screenings can identify potential problems in the early stages when treatments are most effective. Annual Checkups and Health Screenings Memorial Hermann Medical Group family medicine physician Reginald Nguyen, MD, recommends seeing your primary care physician annually for screenings and vaccinations, and tomanage any chronic health conditions. For patientswith chronic illnesses, Dr. Nguyenwarns that skipping appointments can be dangerous. “Patients are staying home and not coming in because of fear,” Nguyen said. “The risk of getting seriously ill or dying fromunderlying chronic conditions is double- or triple-fold the risk of dying fromCOVID-19.” Heart Health Screenings Monitoring blood pressure and cholesterol is essential to maintaining goodheart health, according toMemorial Hermann Medical Group cardiovascular disease specialistMajidBasit,MD. “Often called the ‘silent killer,’ high blood pressure can cause problems before you ever experience a single symptom,”Dr. Basit says. “High blood pressure can be a ticking time bomb, putting you at a higher risk of heart attack and stroke.” Another risk factor for vascular disease is high cholesterol. Everyone should have their cholesterol checked beginning at age 25, and even earlier if you have a family history,” says Dr. Basit. If you have cardiac symptoms such as progressive chest pain or shortness of breath, Dr. Basit advises seeing your healthcare provider right away.

• Diabetes screening • Obesity screening

• Depression screening • Cholesterol screening • Prostate cancer screening for males after shared decision making • Breast cancer screen for females – starting age 40 Every 3-5 years* • Well woman exam Every 10 years* • Colorectal cancer screen – starting age 50 *For healthy adults without risk factors or family history. Speak with your physician about the timing that is appropriate for you.

Reginald Nguyen, MD Family Medicine Physician Memorial Hermann Medical Group

Nadim Jafri, MD Gastroenterologist Memorial Hermann Medical Group

Majid Basit, MD Cardiovascular Disease Specialist Memorial Hermann Medical Group

Kyle Keyes, MD Urologist Memorial Hermann Medical Group

Looking for a primary care physician or specialist? Visit memorialhermann.org/FortBendFamilies or call 713.222.CARE (2273).

Advancing health. Personalizing care.

13

PostCOVID-ResolutionAdvertorial_CI_9.1837x11.25 C.indd 1 SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

1/6/21 3:31 PM

CULL INAN PARK Phase 2 improvements at Cullinan Park, which are anticipated to occur in 2021, will include the addition of several trails and parking spaces, as well as extending the driveway to a future learn, explore and play area. Exploring

to complete, include the additions of a decomposed granite trail for walkers and joggers, a new concrete trail con- nected to the park’s existing trail sys- tem, the extension of the park’s entry road and additional parking spaces. Once Phase 2 improvements are complete, Mallett said the conservancy is focusing on fundraising for a learn, explore and play area, known as LEAP, geared toward children. “[LEAP] is going to be a place that families are going to love bringing their children to,” Mallett said. “It’ll be safe, yet it will be hands-on. It will be exciting for the kids. They’ll get to do things—get dirty, learn about nature, experience it.” Nina Cullinan’s vision The park has a long history. Du said the land was first settled in 1828 by Alexander Hodge, a member of the Old 300, the approximately 300 settlers who received land grants in Stephen F. Austin’s first colony. For the next 150 years, the land was used for cattle, sugar cane and other crops, Du said. In 1989, the Houston Parks Board purchased the land and created the park following a gift from Nina Culli- nan—as well as donations from the Brown Foundation, the TPWD and the city of Houston. After Nina Cullinan’s death, half of her estate was left to the Houston Parks Board with the inten- tion of creating a nature park named after her parents, Joseph S. and Lucie H. Cullinan. Will Cravens, a member of the con- servancy’s board and the great-nephew of Nina Cullinan, said his great aunt’s love of nature came from her father— the founder of Texaco. “He was really passionate about the arts and also about parks … and he really instilled this love of natural areas in his kids,” Cravens said. “That’s why she was so interested in making this more of a nature park than a parkwith a bunch of other types of amenities. Peo- ple can get out here and see nature as it truly is.” Attractingmorevisitors While Sugar Land does not track the number of daily visitors to the park, Du said the city performed a moment- in-time traffic count in July. At that time, Du said there was an average of 350 cars per day, with about 300 per day on weekdays and 500 per day on weekends. “People love this park because of the nature, water, fishing, birding,” Du said. “In some spots, you don’t feel like you’re in Texas.”

$1.21M spent on Phase I renovations

Existing trail Existing driveway Driveway extension

Proposed trail Proposed trailhead Parking lot additions

WHITE LAKE

6

SOURCE: CULLINAN PARK CONSERVANCY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FUTURE “LEAP” PLAYGROUND

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

CONTINUED FROM 1

the park, a move that allowed it to pro- vide on-site security and upkeep ser- vices, Du said. However, the Houston Parks Board still owns two tracts of land for the park, and the city of Houston owns the other two tracts. While Sugar Land pays for costs asso- ciated with day-to-day park mainte- nance, the Cullinan Park Conservancy was founded in 2010 with the goal of fundraising for major park improve- ments that aim to increase access to the park for human visitors while preserv- ing its natural beauty, Mallett said. “The conservancy is challenged with conserving and protecting the park for both the human visitors and the wild- life that call it home, so you have to bal- ance how much development you do,” Mallett said. “We’re really fortunate that we have such a large chunk of land here that is preserved for nature and that it’s going to remain that way.” In September 2019, the city of Sugar Land and the conservancy completed Phase 1 improvements, which con- sisted of installing a restroom facility, new trail routes, signage, an overlook ofWhite Lake andunderstory clearance along Hwy. 6—which improved the park’s visibility to the public, Du said. Theconservancy fundraisedapproxi- mately $1.2million for Phase 1 improve- ments, according to documents from the city of Sugar Land. Additionally, the conservancy donated $213,500 to the city of Sugar Land in December to begin design and construction documentation for Phase 2 improvements, which are expected to cost about $1 million, Du said. A $250,000 grant from the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department will help cover some of the costs associated with the new trails, Mallett said. Phase2 improvements,whichMallett predicted will take until the end of 2021

PUMPKIN LAKE

Visitors are drawn to Cullinan Park to explore the park’s natural beauty. At least 264 different species of birds have been seen at Cullinan Park, and the park is home to at least 380 species of plants. Photography enthusiasts and birders alike enter Cullinan Park’s annual photo contest. Here are some of the scenes documented at the park in 2020. ON DISPLAY Natur�

1st place - Photographer’s choice

Golden Orb Weaver

3rd place - Wildlife

3rd place - Birds

Green Tree Frog

Great Egret

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CULLINAN Comparing

Cullinan Park is about 90 acres smaller than Central Park in New York City. Here is how it stacks up to some other popular urban parks.

160 ACRES 754 ACRES 843 ACRES 1,464 ACRES 4,210 ACRES

DRIVE THRU TODDLER FAIR Spring Fling Saturday, March 13, 2021 11:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Buffalo Bayou Park Houston

Cullinan Park Sugar Land

Central Park New York City

Memorial Park Houston

Griffith Park Los Angeles

SOURCES: BUFFALO BAYOU PARTNERSHIP, CULLINAN PARK CONSERVANCY, CENTRAL PARK CONSERVANCY, CITY OF HOUSTON, CITY OF LOS ANGELES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

With 264 species of birds, the park has become a destination for bird- watchers, Mallett said. Albert Ribes, a self-described birder and biology professor who frequently visits the park on his way to or from his work at the University of St. Thomas, said the sheer size of the park is appeal- ing because there is always something new to discover. “It’s a place where … I can relax, and it doesn’t make me feel like I live in a city,” said Ribes, who earned the nick- name the “King of Cullinan Park” after he became the first person to see 200 unique species of birds at the park. “For that time, it feels like I’m living back in the country. And it’s fantastic.” Albert Ribes, nicknamed the “King of Cullinan” after he was the first person to identify more than 200 birds at Cullinan Park, described how he once saw a barred owl at Cullinan Park. PEOPLE KINGOF CULLINAN Park [IT] WAS RIGHT THERE ON THE PATH; IT’S NOT LIKE I HAD TO GO ANYWHERE.

Ribes said since the pandemic began, he has seen a noticeable uptick in vis- itors—including birders and nonbirders alike. He said the pandemic—and the need for outside activities—exposed the park, which he called “the secret gem of Fort Bend [County],” to more people. “As we’re seeing during this pan- demic, people are really able to go out and enjoy nature and get out of their houses,” Cravens said. “I think people are starting to see just how wonderful this park is.”

Heritage Park 8719 Azalea Crossing Ct Missouri City, TX 77459

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Nina Cullinan

CULLINAN FAMILY

Nina Cullinan’s estate was used in part to purchase the land which now makes up Cullinan Park. The park is named after her father and mother, Joseph S. and Lucie H. Cullinan. Nina’s great-nephew, Will Cravens, said her father instilled in her a love of nature. THAT’S WHY SHEWAS SO INTERESTED INMAKING THIS MORE OF A NATURE PARK THEN A PARKWITH A BUNCH OF OTHER TYPES OF AMENITIES. PEOPLE CAN GET OUT HERE AND SEE NATURE AS IT TRULY IS. WILL CRAVENS, CULLINAN PARK CONSERVANCY BOARD MEMBER AND NINA CULLINAN’S GREAT-NEPHEW

Register at SIENNATX.COM

LOOKING AT ME, I WAS LOOKING AT HER, TOOK PICTURES. ITWAS FANTASTIC, ONE OF THOSE MAGICAL MOMENTS. ALBERT RIBES, UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS BIOLOGY PROFESSOR

It’s fun growing up in Sienna Come See!

SIENNATX.COM

Barred Owl

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SUGAR LAND - MISSOURI CITY EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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