Alpharetta - Milton Edition | March 2020

ALPHARETTA MILTON EDITION

INAUGURAL ISSUE

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1  MARCH 13APRIL 16, 2020

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ALPHARETTA Dozens of new projects underway in downtown

INSIDE

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IMPACTS

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“WE REALLYARE EXCEPTIONAL IN THE FACT THATWE ARE BLESSEDWITH SOMANY THINGS FORMOST CITIES OUR SIZE, AND THAT MAKES US SPECIAL.” JIM GILVIN, ALPHARETTA MAYOR

Rucker Road project tonish this spring

TRANSPORTATION

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Downtown visions The downtown landscapes of both the cities of Alpharetta and Milton will see major developments coming in the next few years, city ocials said.

Alpharettamulls potential fall bondprojects

MILTON First food hall concept coming to Crabapple area

CITY GOVERNMENT

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INSIDE

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“THIS PROJECT IS A KEY COMPONENT IN THE CREATIONOF A DOWNTOWN CORE FOR THE CITYA WALKABLE AREA WHERE PEOPLE CAN EAT, SOCIALIZE, LIVE ANDWORK.” JOE LOCKWOOD, MILTON MAYOR

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The Hamilton, a boutique hotel located on Milton Avenue, is just one of more than a dozen projects under construction in downtown Alpharetta. (top). The Market District at Crabapple development in Milton will house a food hall, oce and restaurant space, and condos (bottom).

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

Newnewspaper working to connect you to theAlpharetta, Milton communities First, I want to thank you for opening up this new publication that landed in your mailbox. Community Impact Newspaper will be delivered to every residential and business mailbox in Alpharetta and Milton during the middle of each month, free of charge with no subscription required. Our website, communityimpact.com, will also supply readers with the latest hyperlocal news. This is a humbling moment for me, our company and our owners, John and Jennifer Garrett. Our newspapers have had the privilege of informing citizens and helping businesses grow for 15 years. In fact, this is our company’s 34th print edition. We are honored to bring our commitment to quality, hyperlocal journalism to Georgia and are grateful for how welcoming the residents and businesses in these communities have been. Launching a newspaper in this day and age can be challenging, but the warmth we’ve felt in the few short weeks leading up to this rst edition has reinforced why we chose Alpharetta and Milton in the rst place. We hope you feel more informed about the area after reading the content of this newspaper—whether it’s the business and dining features, news reports, construction project updates or the To-do List. I expect you’ll come to rely on this content just as much as the 2.9 million other residences and businesses who receive Community Impact Newspaper each month.

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERATLANTAMETRO Allison Altobelli, aaltobelli@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Kara McIntyre COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Timothy Anderson DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway STAFF DESIGNERS Anya Gallant, Damien Hernandez, Chelsea King, Lindsay Scott, Isabella Short BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 308 Maxwell Road, Ste. 200 Alpharetta, GA 30009 • 4044189444 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES alpnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions ADVERTISEWITHUS For advertising inquiries, please contact us at communityimpact.com/advertising . © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

Allison Altobelli, PUBLISHER

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Updates on local projects including Rucker, Kimball Bridge and Bethany roads

What can I expect to nd in ‘Community Impact Newspaper’ eachmonth? Howdy! I had to throw a “howdy” in this note somewhere. I come to you from Houston, Texas, where I served as a reporter for the Tomball/Magnolia edition of Community Impact Newspaper since September 2018. I swallowed my fears of leaving my home state and moved to Alpharetta in late January, all to bring a newspaper I carry so close to my heart to another community that needs us. At Community Impact Newspaper , we believe bringing unbiased, nonpartisan news on transportation, local businesses, schools, and city and county government decisions—the issues that aect you every day—is more important than ever. That’s what we will strive to do each and every month, and that’s a promise. I won’t pretend to suddenly be an expert on the Alpharetta/ Milton areas. After all, I only moved here less than two months ago. But that’s the beauty of this job, this company and all of the communities we cover: We get to learn right along with you, our readers. If you have a story idea, let us know at alpnews@communityimpact.com. I can’t wait to hear from you.

CITY& COUNTY The latest local news

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Kara McIntyre, EDITOR

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Information on upcoming elections BUSINESS FEATURE

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ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020

IMPACTS

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE & KRISTA WADSWORTH

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Crave Pie Studio

MILTON

COURTESY CRAVE PIE STUDIO

NOWOPEN 1 Even Hotel Alpharetta-Avalon Area , located at 2715 Old Milton Parkway, Alpharetta, opened at the beginning of the year and held a ribbon-cutting ceremony Feb. 18. The hotel focuses on oering patrons healthy lifestyle options, including a state-of-the-art tness center and in-room tness options. The hotel is dog-friendly. 770-869-2546. www.ihg.com 2 Carson Kitchen opened in early February at 4 S. Main St., Alpharetta. The menu features Southern-inuenced dishes ranging from frog leg and grilled oyster and crispy chicken skin appetizers to sandwiches, meat and sh plates, sal- ads and atbreads. 770-696-1752. www.carsonkitchen.com/atl 3 Wellstar Avalon Health Park opened Dec. 16 at 2450 Old Milton Parkway, Alpharetta. The 40,000-square-foot urgent care facility provides primary and specialty care in addition to imaging and lab services for patients ranging from newborns to adults. The facility also oers physical therapy for a range of outpatient orthopedic conditions. 470-267-0260. www.wellstar.org 4 Crave Pie Studio opened Dec. 28 at 360 Commerce St., Alpharetta. The pie studio oers 5-inch, made-from-scratch pies in an assortment of avors, including banana cream, Key lime, sugar cream, Chocolate Chess, classic and Dutch apple, quiches and chicken pot pies. Select pies are oered in a 10-inch size. www.cravepie.com 5 Code Ninjas Milton opened in Febru- ary at 12460 Crabapple Road, Ste. 401,

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Alpharetta, according to its Facebook page. Code Ninjas teaches computer programming through a game-based curriculum to children ages 7-14. As stu- dents progress, they earn “belts” like in a traditional martial arts program. 678-404-8247. www.codeninjas.com COMING SOON 6 Where’s the Scoop Gourmet Ice Cream is expected to open in late March or April at 26 Old Roswell Road, Unit B, Alpharetta. The ice cream shop sells rolled ice cream, vegan rolled ice cream, bubble teas and freshly ground coee. www.wheresthescoop.com 7 A new Bualo Wild Wings , oering the brand’s new design, is expected to open in the second quarter of this year at 10890 Haynes Bridge Road, Alpharet- ta. The new design features a more prominent bar that anchors indoor and patio dining, new xtures and ooring, exible seating types, a VIP space and new audio/video technology. Bualo Wild Wings’ menu includes chicken wings, burgers, wraps and salads, along with beer, wine, spirits and cocktails. www.bualowildwings.com ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020 Avalon, an 86-acre outdoor shopping center o Old Milton Parkway in Alpharetta, features more than 500,000 square feet of retail space, a 12-screen movie theater, a conference center, a full-service hotel, oce space, single-family residences and luxury rental homes. Several new businesses have opened or are going to open here in the coming months. NOWOPEN 1 An Evereve location opened in Avalon at 400 Avalon Blvd., Alpharetta, on March 4. Evereve is a women’s fashion brand known for a personalized styling experience by sta trained to style wom- en for their body type and lifestyle. The retailer sells a variety of women’s clothes and accessories. https://evereve.com 2 Sephora was expected to open a new location in Avalon at 3130 Avalon Blvd., Alpharetta, on March 6. Sephora is a cosmetics retailer featuring more

ANNIVERSARIES 8 SeaVentures Aquatic Center is cele- brating 30 years in business with an event March 21-22. The business oers lessons in swimming, scuba diving, freediving and snorkeling, and it hosts diving trips. SeaVentures also has a diving store at its 8,000-square-foot location at 2880 Holcomb Bridge Road, Alpharetta. 770-992-3772. www.seaventures.com CLOSINGS 9 After more than six years in busi- ness, the owners of Laurel & May Market announced in a note on their website that they will be closing the location at 12630 Crabapple Road, Milton, on March 14. In the note, the owners said there were “unable to come to a mutually agreeable resolution with the management/owners of Crabapple Market.” The location func- tioned as a coee shop, bakery, market and gift store. www.laurelandmay.com 10 Atlantic Seafood Co. at 2345 Mansell Road, Alpharetta, closed in Jan- uary, according to a company statement on OpenTable. than 400 brands and personalized client services with trained beauty advisors. www.sephora.com COMING SOON 3 Biltong Bar at Avalon is expected to open sometime this summer at 400 Avalon Blvd., Alpharetta. The South African bar and restaurant serves street food and craft cocktails and specializes in all-natural, aged beef jerky known as biltong. This will be the third Biltong location in the Atlanta area. https://biltong-bar.com 4 A 10-story, 250,000-square-foot oce building, 10000 Avalon , is expected to open later this year at the corner of Old Milton Parkway and First Street. The building, which is the second and nal oce building in Avalon, and on-site amenities will include a 2,535-square-foot tness center and a 3,615-square-foot outdoor living room. www.8000avalon.com

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TODO LIST

March-April events

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra will perform with Styx on April 19.

LIVEMUSIC AMERIS BANK AMPHITHEATRE 2020 PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE 2200 Encore Parkway, Alpharetta 404-733-5010 www.livenation.com Alpharetta’s 12,000-seat entertainment destination has a solid lineup of performances throughout the year. Tickets can be purchased through Live Nation. APRIL 19 Styx with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra MAY 17 Kesha with special guest Big Freedia JUNE 11 Sam Hunt 14 The Doobie Brothers 18 Slipknot, Underoath and Code Orange 19 Brad Paisley 20 Alanis Morissette with Garbage JULY 02 Chicago with Rick Springeld 05 Megadeth and Lamb of God 14 Sammy Hagar & The Circle and Whitesnake with Night Ranger 21 Disturbed 29 Dave Matthews Band AUGUST 01 KIDZ BOP Live 13 Daryl Hall & John Oates 19 Nickelback 22 Rod Stewart with Cheap Trip 25 Korn & Faith No More

MARCH 21

SHAMROCKIN’ FOR A CURE AMERIS BANK AMPHITHEATRE

APRIL 04

EASTER EGG HUNT CAMBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL STADIUM

ShamRockin’ for a Cure returns for its annual fundraiser for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, featuring live music, beer, wine, hand-crafted cocktails, live and silent auctions, and a variety of food vendors. 7 p.m.-midnight. $105-$115. Ameris Bank Amphitheatre, 2200 Encore Parkway, Alpharetta. 404-733-5010. www.shamrockinforacure.com

Stonecreek Church and the city of Milton partner to provide a communitywide Easter egg hunt for all ages. Games, face painting, music and a visit from the Easter Bunny can be expected at this event. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Cambridge High School Football Stadium, 2845 Bethany Bend Road, Milton. 678-242-2619. www.cityofmiltonga.us

24 VOTE ON ELECTIONDAY Cast a vote in the 2020 presidential preference primary election. Registered voters can vote in the Republican or Democratic primary, but not both. Visit www.mvp.sos.ga.gov and login to see the correct election day polling location. APRIL 04 SUPPORT LOCAL VETERANS Enjoy a night out in Alpharetta with a Monte Carlo casino theme at the Sway Event Concepts’ fundraiser to help with renovations to American Legion Post 201’s new building. Attendees can experience music, dancing, casino tables, dinner, and a wine and bourbon pull as well as other activities. 7-11 p.m. $115. American Legion Post 201, 201 Wills Road, Alpharetta. michelleb.sway@att.net. The Alpharetta Farmers Market will kick o its 2020 season, running each Saturday until the nal day of the season Oct. 31. Visitors of the farmers market can peruse an array of fruits, vegetables and natural meats directly from local farmers; fresh owers and herbs from local gardeners; and desserts, breads, raw honey, homemade sauces, jellies and soaps from local makers. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free (entry). Village Green, 2 Park Plaza, Alpharetta. afmmarketmanager@gmail.com. www.awesomealpharetta.com 06 LAUGHAT A COMEDY SHOW The Punchline Comedy Night at Avalon hosts the rst of a monthly event that takes place April through October. The comedy night features live comedy acts and drink specials. The April headliner had not yet been announced as of press time. The performance lasts about 90 minutes and is recommended for people age 13 and older. 7:30 p.m. Free. Palmer Plaza between Oak Steakhouse and Colletta in Avalon, 400 Avalon Blvd., Alpharetta. www.experienceavalon.com www.swayeventconcepts.com 04 VISIT THE FARMERS MARKET KICKOFF

MARCH 14 ENJOY LIVEMUSIC, FOODAT FUNDRAISER FOR HOMELESS Check out live music from more than 10 artists, try two dierent food trucks, drink beer and wine, participate in a wine pull and enter in a rae auction at the second annual Tappin’ Out Homelessness event, which raises funds for The Drake House. The Drake House, located in Roswell, provides emergency housing for single homeless women with children in north metro Atlanta. $1 from every beer and wine sale goes back to The Drake House. 2-6 p.m. Free (entry). Truck & Tap, 30 Milton Ave., Alpharetta. www.thedrakehouse.org 14 CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY Olde Blind Dog Irish Pub will host its 12th annual St. Patrick’s Day party, featuring live music and drink specials. The annual St. Baldrick’s Foundation head -shaving event will also be held during the festivities to raise money for childhood cancer research. 10 a.m. (party), 2-5 p.m. (head-shaving event). $10 (entry). Olde Blind Dog Irish Pub, 12650 Crabapple Road, Milton. 678-624-1090. www.bigtickets.com/ events/oldeblinddog/2020-st-patricks- day-bash-milton 15 RUN INA 5K, WIN FREE BEER Jekyll Brewing will host its inaugural Running of the Leprechauns 5K to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. The run begins at Wills Park and nishes in downtown Alpharetta with an awards ceremony and a post-race celebration. Participants age 21 and older will receive a free beer at the post-race celebration. 10:30 a.m. $30-$40. Wills Park Community Pool, 1815 Old Milton Parkway, Alpharetta. 770-527-2882. www.runsignup.com/race/ga/alpharetta/

Edition,” a musical theater show set in the 1920s about “merry murderesses” Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly seeking acquittal for murders they committed. This show is rated PG-13. Group tickets are discounted for groups of 10 or more if purchased in advance. 7 p.m. (Fri.-Sun.), 2 p.m. (Sun.). $15-$20. Milton High School, 13025 Birmingham Highway, Milton. 404-797-1817. www.miltontheatrecompany.com 21 LEARNABOUT PLANT PROPAGATION Head out to the Old Rucker Farm & Park to engage in a hands-on workshop and learn how to propagate plants. Attendees will learn the technique, timing and the correct kinds of plants for successful propagation. 1-2 p.m. Free (registration required). 910 Rucker Road, Alpharetta. 404-314-1245. www.alpharetta-community-agriculture- program.square.site 22 ENJOY A SPRING CONCERT The Alpharetta City Band performs its Spring Concert, featuring works from composers including John Williams, Clare Grundman, John Philip Sousa and Brant Karrick. 3 p.m. Free. St. David’s Episcopal Church Jeerd’s Hall, 1015 Old Roswell Road, Roswell. www.alpharetta.ga.us 22 CYCLE FOR A CAUSE The Olde Blind Dog Cycling Club hosts its fourth Annual St. Paddy O’Pedal Ride to Conquer Childhood Cancer. The ride features three dierent lengths of rides—a 62-mile metric ride, a 45-mile ride and a 25-mile ride—and proceeds benet the Kiersten Dickson Memorial Cancer Research Endowment supporting pediatric cancer research at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Aac Cancer Center. A hot brunch and a free beer will be provided by From the Earth Brewery from noon- 3 p.m. 7:30 a.m. (day of registration and packet pick-up), 9 a.m. (Metric ride), 10 a.m. (25-mile and 45-mile ride). $50 (until March 21), $55 (March 22). Milton City Hall Community Place, 2006 Heritage Walk, Milton. https://runsignup.com/Race/GA/ Milton/SPOP

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SCHOOL THEATER The Milton Theatre Company will perform four showings of “Chicago: High School

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Find more or submit Alpharetta and Milton events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

ONGOING PROJECTS

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Kimball Bridge Road improvements The city of Alpharetta is working on a project to extend the eastbound right- turn lane on Kimball Bridge Road at Waters Road back to North Point Park- way as well as extend the westbound right-turn lane from Kimball Bridge to North Point. A new roundabout at the intersection of Kimball Bridge and Rock Mill roads, in addition to sidewalk widenings on the south side of Kimball Bridge, are also included in this project. Timeline: February 2020-third quarter 2021 Cost: $15.7 million Funding source: 2016 parks and transportation bond

Construction on Rucker Road has been ongoing for about three years, but is expected to wrap up this spring, city ocials said. (Photos by Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

Rucker Road improvements towrap up this spring

BY KARA MCINTYRE

Some Rucker neighborhood resi- dents have expressed concerns about a loss in quality of life and safety due to road construction and increased trac, including Cliord Martin, a Rucker neighborhood resident who spoke during public comment at an Alpharetta City Council meeting Feb. 3. While drivers can currently use Rucker, nal landscaping and lighting installments should be complete by April or May, barring inclement weather or other construction delays, Drinkard said. “Three years ago, as part of the Rucker Road project, all the trees, shrubs and other vegetation on the right of way were removed,” Martin said during the meeting. “[Construc- tion has] also removed the safety barrier that kept vehicles out of our yards. It removed the sound barriers that lowered growth noise levels, and it removed the sight barriers that gave those of us along the roadway some privacy.” Drinkard said the process of improv- ing Rucker shaped and changed city ocials’ overall philosophy on how they handle transportation projects, particularly with neighborhood collectors such as Rucker. A neighborhood collector is a roadway classication, meaning the

After nearly three years of construction, residents along the Rucker Road corridor can expect to see construction relief this spring, according to James Drinkard, the assistant city administrator for the city of Alpharetta. Construction on the $15.4 million Rucker project—which included adding two roundabouts; narrowing travel lanes; providing sidewalks on both sides of the roadway; and adding aesthetic features, such as trees and planted medians—began in 2017, spanning fromWills Road west to the Alpharetta city limits, just past Spring Place Lane. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, the city of Alpharetta’s popula- tion nearly doubles during working hours, totaling more than 122,000 in daytime population while the total number of residents sits at 66,263 as of 2018. Drinkard said much of this inow comes from Cherokee County, located northwest of Alpharetta, using Rucker as one route to the city. “Rucker, which was never intended to be a key arterial, started carrying that kind of load. It puts a lot of strain on an infrastructure running right through a ton of neighborhoods,” he said.

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road is designed to collect trac from inside neighborhoods along the corridor and send it to an arterial road—or a major thoroughfare, such as Old Milton Parkway, Haynes Bridge Road and Georgia 400. “When you’re doing a construction project, there are these long periods of time where there may be things happening and the public can’t see it. There’s also periods of time where you’re just sitting there waiting on utility companies to move their utilities,” Drinkard said. “There were these long periods of silence [with Rucker], which just adds to the frustration, so we denitely learned from that.”

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Bethany Road roundabouts Two new roundabouts are under construction on Bethany Road at the intersections of Mayeld and Mid Broadwell roads. The city of Alpharetta project is funded by the Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax, or TSPLOST. Timeline: July 2019-May 2020 (both roundabouts) Cost: $4 million (total) Funding source: TSPLOST

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 4. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT ALPNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020

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Community Impact Newspaper on the Inaugural Alpharetta/Milton Edition and Community Impact Newspaper Atlanta Publisher Allison Altobelli, Springfield College Class of 2004. Congratulations

To learn more about Springfield College, visit springfield.edu 263 Alden Street. Springfield, Mass (413) 748-3136

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY GOVERNMENT Alpharetta City Council begins discussions for potential fall bond

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

Alpharetta City Council members are discussing project lists throughout March and April for a potential fall bond referendum on the November ballot. Here are some of the potential projects. Projects and cost are all subject to change.

ROADS

Dryden Road extension: $3 million

Marjean Way construction and stormwater: $3 million

Douglas Road traffic calming: $1.65 million

Alpha Loop: $5 million

BY KARA MCINTYRE

state authority to raise its homestead exemption—a form of tax relief that can reduce the taxable value of a homeowner’s property, Gilvin said— from $45,000 to $52,500. Commercial property owners are not eligible for homestead exemptions. “Alpharetta is unique and remark- able, but we’re trying to pay for a top 10 economic city with bedroom community dollars,” said Council Member Jason Binder, a proponent of the bond. Council discussions on proposed projects will continue in March and April. Public hearings on proposed projects could begin in May with a bond question submittal to Fulton County by the end of June, according to city documents.

Alpharetta residents could see a bond referendum of up to $50 million on the ballot this November, accord- ing to discussions during City Council meetings the past two months. Mayor Jim Gilvin said the initial idea for a 2020 bond came from other members of City Council in fall 2019, and conversations about the need for another bond referendum— and funding it partially through a tax increase—have continued since then; however, Gilvin said in a Feb. 19 interview that the city has about $25 million in bonding capacity without raising taxes. “When they first brought the idea of a tax increase to finance [the bond] to me, I told them, ‘I don’t think that’s necessary.’ We have millions of dollars available,” Gilvin said. At the Feb. 3 City Council meeting, council members voted 4-3 to seek

McGinnis Ferry Road: $3 million- $6 million

Milton Avenue streetscapes: $5 million

North Point corridor (sidewalks and crosswalks design): $5 million-$10 million

Southlake Drive culvert: $1.3 million

Webb Bridge Road extension: $14 million

Southlake Drive traffic calming: $2 million

Waters Road construction and sidewalks: $4.3 million

Windward Parkway pedestrian bridge crossings: $2.2 million

PARKS

Union Hill trailhead: $2 million Wills Park master plan: $57 million

Old Rucker Farm: $2 million

Mayfield Road park: $1 million

Wills Park stream restoration project: $2 million

Wills Park equestrian center: $2.5 million (with foundation paying $2.5 million as well)

FOLLOW ALONG FOR FUTURE COVERAGE OF THIS STORY AT COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM .

SOURCE: CITY OF ALPHARETTA/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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ALPHARETTA - MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Alpharetta and Milton city councils, Fulton County Schools

QUOTESOFNOTE “THE STATE OF THE CITYOF ALPHARETTA IS REMARKABLE. WHEREWE’VE COME OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS IS AMAZING.” JIM GILVIN, ALPHARETTA MAYOR "IN JUST OUR 13TH YEARAS A CITY, WE ARE GROWING AS A COMMUNITY ANDGROWING INTOOUROWN." JOE LOCKWOOD, MILTON MAYOR LOCAL HIGHLIGHTS ALPHARETTA Alpharetta City Council members authorized the $795,000 purchase of about one- quarter acre of land at the corner of Milton Avenue and Canton Street for a pocket park at the Feb. 24 council meeting. The park will be connected to the pedestrian pathway planned in conjunction with construction of The Hamilton, a boutique hotel located at 21 Milton Avenue. MILTON Community Development Director Parag Agrawal brought forward a list of objectives Feb. 19 for the city’s equestrian-friendly zoning project, which began the planning phase in October 2019. Project plans will be solidied at a future meeting. FULTON COUNTY SCHOOLS Voting in the 2020 School Governance Council elections begins March 17 and ends March 24. SGCs are made up of nine voting members and each FCS campus has a SGC. Alpharetta City Council Meets March 16 and 23 as well as April 6 at 6:30 p.m. at 2 Park Plaza, Alpharetta. 678-297-6000. www.alpharetta.ga.us Milton City Council Meets March 16 and April 15 at 6 p.m. at 2006 Heritage Walk, Milton. 678-242-2500. www.cityofmiltonga.us Fulton County Schools Meets March 18 at 6 p.m. at the South Learning Center, 4025 Flat Shoals Road, Union City. 470-254-3600. MEETINGSWE COVER

Alpharetta, Miltonmayors discuss 2020visions

BY KARA MCINTYRE

North Point Parkway. “The potential for North Point is remarkable, and it has a chance to add something to the city of Alpharetta that doesn’t exist now,” Gilvin said during his speech. City of Milton Lockwood also highlighted the city of Milton’s rural, equestrian heritage as a focal point for 2020. He said the city is working to fulll this vision in three initiatives: drafting legislation for equestrian and agricultural zoning to incen- tivize equestrian and agricultural users, continuing to purchase green space to protect land from develop- ment and rewriting the city’s tree ordinance. “Each of these initiatives is indic- ative of our goal to preserve Milton’s unique history and character,” Lockwood said.

In the city of Milton, the extension of Charlotte Drive fromMayeld Road to Birmingham Highway is slated to be complete later this year, Lockwood said during his speech. Additionally, a citywide study of road conditions, speed limits and other trac factors will be done sometime this year as well. “In just our 13th year as a city, we are growing as a community and growing into our own. I’mpleased to say the state of our city is strong,” Lockwood said. “Still, there’s a negative side eect to being a place everyone would like to

ALPHARETTA, MILTON Both Milton Mayor Joe Lockwood and Alpharetta Mayor Jim Gilvin held their State of the City addresses Jan. 30 and Feb. 13, respectively—both of which placed transportation projects as a priority in 2020. Gilvin said the city of Alpharetta has more than $200 million in road projects planned over the next eight years, including Kimball Bridge Road improvements as well as Windward Parkway eastbound and westbound widenings slated to begin construc- tion this year. Construction on Kim- ball Bridge began in early February. “The state of the city of Alpharetta is remarkable. Where we’ve come in the last 30 years is amazing,” Gilvin said during his speech. “Over the last year, we’ve spent millions andmillions of dollars investing in roads and infrastructure.”

call home: trac.” City of Alpharetta

Redevelopment of the North Point corridor—where the North Point Mall lies—is another focus point for the city of Alpharetta, Gilvin said. Plans are in design for redevelop- ment of the mall area and all along

Newpublic safety complex to open onHwy. 9 in 2020 MILTON A new public safety complex—which will house the city of Milton’s police department headquarters and the municipal court as well as Fire Station No. 44—is scheduled to open later this year, Milton Mayor Joe Lockwood said in his State of the City address Jan. 30. The complex broke ground in 2019 on Hwy. 9, and Station No. 44 will be the rst re station the city has built from the ground up, Lockwood said. Currently, the reghters zoned to the Deereld area of Milton—near Hwy. 9 and Deereld Parkway—share Station No. 81 on Webb Bridge Road with the city of Alpharetta, he said, while the municipal court and police work out of a BY KARA MCINTYRE

9

The newpublic safety complex is expected to open this year. (Rendering courtesy city ofMilton)

rental facility on Deereld Parkway. “The new facility will be more secure; it will be more ecient; and best of all it will be their own permanent home,” Lockwood said. The city also plans to demolish and rebuild Fire Station No. 42 on Thompson Road, with an estimated construction completion in 2021.

City begins process for newplayground

9

BY KARA MCINTYRE

said the new playground—of which the city will provide $25,000 and the remaining $75,000 will be funded by Northside Hospital Foundation and the Resurgens Charitable Foundation— will feature inclusive equipment to accommodate handicapped students and residents. In exchange for the new playground and landscape improve- ments, the playground area will serve

ALPHARETTA Alpharetta City Council members approved an inter- governmental agreement between the city and Fulton County Schools at the March 2 council meeting to place a $100,000 community playground at Alpharetta Elementary School. Morgan Rodgers, the director of recreation, parks and cultural services,

N

www.fultonschools.org Fulton County Board of Commissioners

as a city park during non-school hours. Playground installation and improvements are scheduled to begin this summer and be completed by August.

Meets the rst and third Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. at 141 Pryor St., Ste. 10, Atlanta. 404-612-4000. www.fultoncountyga.gov

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

Candidates and information for the March primaries

WHERE TO VOTE

Important dates

GUIDE ELECTION Primary 2020

March 2: rst day of early voting March 20: last day to apply for absentee ballot March 20: last day of early voting March 24: primary election day Voters can vote in the Republican or Democratic primary, but not both.

Visit communityimpact.com to see a full list and map of where to vote during early voting and on election day. the county during early voting. On election day, voters must report to their assigned polling place. Visit www.mvp.sos.ga.gov and login to see the correct election day polling location. Registered voters in Fulton County can vote at any polling place in

Follow along for election night coverage at communityimpact.com.

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

SAMPLE BALLOT

TURNOUT AND DEMOGRAPHICS

OTHER ELECTION DATES TO KNOW IN 2020

R: Republican D: Democrat

FEDERAL U.S. president

March 2016 presidential primaries turnout

May 19 • State and federal primaries for the Georgia House of Representatives, the U.S. House of Representatives, the Georgia Senate and the U.S. Senate • County primaries for District 2 commissioner, sheri, surveyor, district attorney, tax commissioner, clerk of superior court and solicitor general • Nonpartisan general election for state supreme court, court of appeals, superior court judges,

Fulton County board of education districts 1, 3 and 4

43.79% of registered voters voted in the primaries Republican: 62.87% Democrat: 37.13%

R: Donald J. Trump* D: Michael Bennet D: Joseph R. Biden D: Michael R. Bloomberg

Nov. 3 • Presidential election

D: Pete Buttigieg D: John K. Delaney D: Tulsi Gabbard D: Amy Klobuchar D: Deval Patrick D: Bernie Sanders D: Tom Steyer D: Elizabeth Warren D: Andrew Yang

• General election for federal, state and county nominees from May 19 primary

* INCUMBENT NOTE: ALL OF THESE CANDIDATES WILL BE LISTED ON THE BALLOT, ALTHOUGH SOME HAVE SUSPENDED THEIR CAMPAIGNS.

Fulton County overall 41.38%

SOURCE: GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Percent of population with high school or higher education Median age

7M

ACTIVE VOTERS

30004 38

30005 37.6

KEY

Presidential preference primary election General election Primary election

94.9%

96.1%

*DENOTES PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION YEAR NOTE: DATA WAS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THE PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY IN 2012. SOURCE: GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER According to an April 2019 study from the Brennan Center for Justice, an estimated 93.7% more voters registered in Georgia in the last ve years, partially due to the state’s implementation of automatic voter registration on driver’s license forms in September 2016.

6M

30009 40.2 96%

19

5M

120

4M

SOURCES: GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE, AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 2018 5YEAR ESTIMATESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

140

30022 39

0

97%

2008*

2010

2012*

2014

2016*

2018

More than a paycheck. �BUT YOU’LLGETONEOF THOSE, TOO.�

MISSIONALWORK CULTURE&TEAMBUILDING PAIDHOLIDAYS �INCLUDINGBIRTHDAYS� PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT ANDGROWTHOPPORTUNITIES COMPREHENSIVEHEALTH PLANS

MATCHING401K& PROFIT�SHARING

LET’S TALK.

Start your application online at communityimpact.com/careers today

NOWHIRING GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

11

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020

INSIDE INFORMATION

A closer look at Alpharetta and Milton

Communi ty demographics COMMUNITY DEMOGRAPHICS Established Alpharetta and relative newcomer Milton each have their own city identity. Read on to see the similarities, dierences and city structures.

COMPILED BY COMMUNITY IMPACT STAFF DESIGNED BY DAMIEN HERNANDEZ

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Downtown Milton, also called downtown Crabapple, features a variety of local businesses as well as City Hall.

Alpharetta City Hall sits in the city’s downtown, which underwent a redevelopment in 201718.

PHOTOS BY KARA MCINTYRECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

MILTON

ALPHARETTA

MEDIAN AGE

Milton Alpharetta

38.8 38.2

Landmass 27.3

Landmass 39.2

Square miles

Square miles

19

140

Population 38,171

Population 64,627

Households with one or more people under age 18

120

92

9

2006

1858

Year incorporated

Year incorporated

41.6% 46.9%

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CITY GOVERNMENT

EMPLOYMENT

Households with one or more people age 65 and older

Milton Milton City Council members serve four-year terms, and elections are held every two years. The mayor is elected at-large, and although district members are also elected at-large, they are required to live in the district they represent.

Alpharetta Alpharetta City Council members serve four-year terms, and elections are held every two years. The mayor is elected by popular vote, and although the council members run for a specic post, they also are elected by a citywide vote.

$125,096 Median income

$

16%

17.6%

$110,171 Median income

$

EDUCATION

Mayor

Mayor

Joe Lockwood

Jim Gilvin

Unemployment rate

High school or higher

District 1, Post 1/Mayor Pro Tem

Post 1/ Mayor Pro Tem

2.2% 4.6%

Peyton Jamison

Donald Mitchell

Health insurance coverage

District 1, Post 2 District 2, Post 1 District 2, Post 2 District 3, Post 1 District 3, Post 2

Post 2

Ben Burnett

Carol Cookerly

97.9% 94.2%

93.8% 93.4%

Post 3

Karen Richard

Laura Bentley

Post 4

John Hipes

Bachelor's degree or higher

Average commute time

Paul Moore

Post 5

Jason Binder

Joe Longoria

Post 6

Dan Merkel

minutes minutes 28.7 28.3

68.7%

68.8%

Rick Mohrig

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOUSING

Median home value

Median monthly rent

$600,000

$1,500

$534,400

$1,375

$500,000

$1,335

$1,182

$439,100

$1,200

$392,200

$400,000

$1,109

$311,100

$300,000

$900

$0

$0

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Total housing units

Owner-occupied housing

Renter-occupied housing

RENT 26.7% 34.8%

RENT

13,625

25,470

73.3% SOLD

65.2%

SOLD

2018

2018

2018

RENT 28.1% 36.2%

RENT

12,617

22,952

71.9% SOLD

63.8%

SOLD

2013

2013

2013

Bluebirds Amongst Late Winter/Early Spring Maples Blooming by Cornbread

AT THE ALPHARETTA ARTS CENTER Experience our 10,000 square-foot space fea- turing state-of-the-art and multiple visual arts studios for ceramics, digital media, black-box theater, gallery exhibits and art events. Unleash your creativity

For Art Class Registration alpharetta.ga.us/arts

Multidisciplinary classes, workshops and lectures for children, teens and adults. • Ceramics

• Creative Writing • Theater • Music • And Much More!

CONTACT 678-297-6135 arts@alpharetta.ga.us

OFFICE HOURS Mon-Thu: Friday: Saturday:

Sunday & Evenings: Open during class & events; Closed during city holidays and inclement weather

• Painting • Drawing • Sculpture

8:30am-8:00pm 8:30am-4:30pm 9:00am-2-00pm

13

ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

Urban Hardware 11770 Haynes Bridge Road, Ste. 501, Alpharetta 770-299-8225 www.urbanhardware.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. HERE, AND I THINKWE FILLED THAT LAST PIECE THAT THE DOWNTOWN ALPHARETTANEEDED.” COLBY RODGERS, ASSISTANT MANAGER GIVING BACK RescuedWine , a California-based candle company, uses recycled wine bottles to hold its handmade, all-natural soy candles in scents such as IPA, stout, lager, merlot and coconut ale. Pet candles are also available in clean home and fresh grass scents, which neutralize pet odors and help relax both dogs and cats. A portion of the proceeds from any Rescued Wine candle purchase goes back to animal rescues across the country. Only select stores carry these candles, and Urban Hardware is one of eight stores in the north Fulton County area that sells them. Rodgers said this is just one example of what makes Urban Hardware unique. “These candles are just one example of the products we oer that you won’t nd in Home Depot or Lowe’s. We’ve got something for everyone, whether you’re looking for home decor items or trying to complete a do-it-yourself home project,” Rodgers said. “WE’RE KINDOF INA HARDWAREDESERTRIGHT

Assistant Manager Colby Rodgers (left) and General Manager Ronald Founds (right) helped open Urban Hardware in April 2019. (Photos by Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

The store oers a selection of outdoor furniture, with 16 new patio sets arriving throughout March.

Guests can nd an array of home improvement products in the 40,000- square-foot facility.

A variety of power tools and hardware can be found at Urban Hardware, including DeWalt and Makita products.

UrbanHardware Alpharetta business combines big-box store feel with small-town service A fter 26 years at Home Depot, General Manager Ronald Founds said he left cabinet hardware and lighting x- tures to paint, home decor and patio furniture. The store also oers blade sharpening, key cutting, re-screen- ing of doors and windows, pipe

BY KARA MCINTYRE

service of a local business. “Our motto is ‘Where service and selection matter,’” Rodgers said. “When [customers] walk in the door, we give them the small-town hardware feel, but in a 40,000-square-foot footprint.” While running a startup business comes with sacrices and chal- lenges, Founds said the customers and the employees make the “roller- coaster” worth it. “Everybody in here gives 110% to help us make this place run because they care. They see the value in what we’re doing. Our employees are just … they’re busting their tails for this,” he said. “We’re still learning, but we’re so grateful to be part of the community.”

the familiarity of a big-box retail store to help start Urban Hardware. He felt a void in his life, he said, and felt Urban Hardware could ll that void—both in his life and in the Alpharetta community. “When I heard about what [owner Lee Pell] was trying to do with Urban Hardware, I was like, ‘Holy cow, that’s something I want to be part of,’” Founds said. “I got one last ght left in me, and I wanted to give it a shot on bringing a company out of the ground.” Urban Hardware’s 40,000-square- foot building is home to a variety of home improvement and hardware products, ranging from power tools,

cutting and threading, glass cutting and minor home repair services. “To make a successful town, you need a hardware store, a grocery store, restaurants and clothing stores,” Assistant Manager Colby Rodgers said. “We’re kind of in a hardware desert right here, and I think we lled that last piece that the downtown Alpharetta needed.” Rodgers said oering such a variety of products and services achieves the goal of being a one- stop shop for anything a customer needs to turn his or her house into a home, but with the customer

120

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

THREE DISHES TO TRY

THREE DISHES TO TRY

The Cheezy Crabby ($12.77) is an o-the-menu appetizer, featuring jumbo lump deep sea crab with cream cheese drizzled in soy sauce.

Pastry chef Megan Allen (left), General Manager Josh Read (middle), and chef and partner Mix McCrory (right) opened 7 Acre barNgrill in April 2019. (Photos by Kara McIntyre/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Smashed Barn Burner Burger ($12) is made of double-smashed short rib, brisket and chuck patties.

7Acre barNgrill Owners oer country tavern menu to Birmingham Crossroads area

I nside the nearly 100-year-old building on Hick- ory Flat Road in Milton sits 7 Acre barNgrill. The renovated building housed a general store back in the 1930s, chef and business partner Mix McCrory said, but it was most recently known as Wilbur & Rudy’s Farm Table. After the previous owners closed Wilbur & Rudy’s Farm Table, McCrory and business partner BY KARA MCINTYRE

However, McCrory said 7 Acre is most well- known for its desserts. Megan Allen, pastry chef and colloquially known by her coworkers as “the pie queen,” handmakes the desserts—such as the chocolate layer cake and the Pride of Alabama Golden Eagle Pecan Pie—fresh every day from her personal recipes, she said. “This restaurant in particular has seen the most success in the dessert program out of any restau-

The chocolate layer cake ($7.77) is made fresh every day, featuring three layers of chocolate cake and chocolate icing.

Chris Sedgwick—president of the Sedgwick Restaurant Group—began discussions for a country tavern-style concept in an area “starved for restaurants,” McCrory said. “We went through a bunch of ideas of who we wanted to be and how we wanted to portray ourselves culinarily,” McCrory said. “[The people out here] want some healthy options, but they also want a good burger.” The restaurant has both lunch

rant I’ve ever worked at in my 40-plus years in the industry,” McCrory said. The restaurant is aptly named for its 7-acre garden in the back- yard of the restaurant, General Manager Josh Read said, which is planned to grow produce and herbs for use in-house and help preserve the land of the long- standing Milton landmark. Keeping in line with preserving history, McCrory said he and Sedgwick repurposed the orig-

“WEWANTED TOBUILD A COMMUNITYHERE ANDBE PART OF THE HISTORYOFMILTON. WE HAVE GREAT NEIGHBORS ANDWE TRY TOBE AGOOD NEIGHBORRIGHTBACK.” MIX MCCRORY, CHEF AND PARTNER

7Acre barNgrill 850 Hickory Flat Road, Milton 770-777-2273 www.7acrebarNgrill.com Hours: Tue.-Sun. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m., 4:30-9 p.m.; closed Mon.

and dinner menus, featuring dishes such as slow- cooked beef brisket; Key lime chicken Caesar salad; and the Smashed Barn Burner Burger, made with double-smashed SBC patties—or short rib, brisket and chuck patties—re-roasted green chiles, pepper jack cheese and chipotle aioli on a toasted brioche bun. The bun is branded with a number seven using the restaurant’s branding iron.

inal ooring to serve as the backboard of the front entrance wall. Additionally, he said the bar shelves and booth rails were milled out of local red oak trees and donated by one of 7 Acre’s regular customers. “We wanted to build a community here and be a part of the history of Milton,” McCrory said. “We have great neighbors, and we try to be a good neighbor right back.”

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ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • MARCH 2020

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