Chandler Edition - December 2020

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 5  DEC. 21, 2020JAN. 24, 2021

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Maricopa County releases COVID19 vaccine distribution plan

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CENTRAL POP

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Multifamily housing outpaces single-family housing in Chandler

According to data from the city of Chandler, the number of multifamily units being developed in the city began outpacing single-family homes in 2018—a trend that continued in 2020.

MORE MULTIFAMILY ON THE HORIZON

Single family units

Multifamily units

4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO Multifamily housing in the city of Chandler is outpacing the develop- ment of new single-family housing, according to city data. According to data from the city of Chandler, in 2019 Chandler saw about 500 new single-family residential units completed compared to just under 1,500 multifamily units in the same year. The city continues to see more new requests for multifamily devel- opments than it does single-family

homes. At a meeting in early November, Chandler City Council approved the rezoning ordinances for four multi- family projects scattered across the city. Each project varies in size and scope, according to plans submitted to the city. “We are seeing what you would expect as a city transitions from sub- urban growth to maintenance,” said Kevin Mayo, planning administrator CONTINUED ON 12

FROM 200819: Single-family units built: 29.4% Multifamily units built: +2,664.58%

1993

2020* 1996 1999 2002 2005 2008 2011 2014 2017

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*AS OF SEPT. 1

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO AND TOM BLODGETT Hundreds of thousands of drivers traverse the Broadway Curve section of I-10 each day, and the Ari- zona Department of Transportation will begin con- struction on the 11-mile stretch of the freeway in 2021 in the region’s largest freeway redevelopment project to date. “Maricopa County, including the East Valley, con- tinues to grow year after year,” ADOT spokesperson CONTINUED ON 14 Construction to begin on key stretch of I10 in 2021

BROADWAY CURVE improvements

Project timeline: 20212024 Cost: $643.68M Funding sources: state, federal

The Arizona Department of Transportation is scheduled to begin a multiyear project on a stretch of I-10 including the Broadway Curve.

IMPROVED RUSH HOUR SPEED

32mph today

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40mph with improvements in 2025 without improvements in 2025 29mph

60

10

202

SOURCE: ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON . Complete 2020 by joining your neighbors with a contribution of any amount to CI Patron. Funds support Community Impact Newspaper ’s hyperlocal, unbiased journalism and help build informed communities. Choose IMPACT . Make a CONTRIBUTION . Strengthen JOURNALISMFORALL . Contribute today! Snap or visit

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION

6 Latest transportation project updates EDUCATION 7 Updates from Chandler schools HEALTH CARE 8 COVID19 vaccinations

MARKET TEAM EDITOR Alexa D’Angelo GRAPHIC DESIGNER Isabella Short ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Johnson

FROMAMY: Anyone who travels from the Chandler-Gilbert area to downtown Phoenix at rush hour knows the pain at the Broadway Curve on I-10. That spot where Tempe and Phoenix meet has long been a chokepoint that transportation ocials have aimed to address. Our front-page story looks at that fast- approaching project. Amy Ellsworth, PUBLISHER

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Amy Ellsworth,

aellsworth@communityimpact.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMALEXA: Our cover story this month includes information on new multifamily developments in Chandler and I hope you learn something from it this month! In this season of giving and gratitude, I wanted to take some time in my note this month to thank you all for reading our paper and supporting our advertisers. I am grateful for your readership and that you spend time reading this publication every month. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

CITY& COUNTY

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John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON

Updates from the city of Chandler

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

BUSINESS FEATURE

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Local sources 14

Businesses coming soon 5

Road projects 4

New businesses 7

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CHANDLER EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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location in Chandler the last week of November at 975 E. Riggs Road, Ste. 10. The jeweler oers diamonds, jewelry and watches. 480-687-9411. https://edmarshalljewelers.com 6 Mr. Mesquite Taqueria opened Dec. 12 at 2425 S. Gilbert Road, Gilbert. The Mexican street food restaurant has seven locations in the Valley. 480-687-3303. https://eatmrmesquite.com The Wellness Connection , a concierge medical practice, had its grand opening Dec. 18. The holistic medical practice is staed by nurse practitioners. https://thewellnessconnection.group COMING SOON 7 A new 810 Billiards & Bowling loca- tion will open in Chandler near Chandler Fashion Center. An opening date is not yet known. The billiards and bowling experience will be located at 3455 W. Frye Road in Chandler. A phone number is not yet available for the business. www.810bowling.com 8 The Desert Dojo is scheduled to open in December in Chandler. An opening date is not yet known. The martial arts studio will serve Chandler, Gilbert, Mesa and Tempe martial arts students. The studio is located at 590 N. Alma School Road, Ste. 25B. 480-721-5898. www. desertdojo.com ANNIVERSARIES 9 Duck Donuts , a doughnut shop, opened Dec. 21, 2019, at 4040 S. Arizona Ave., Ste. 8, Chandler. The business is

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NOWOPEN 1 AZ Pho & Grill , a sit-down Vietnamese restaurant, has opened its third location near the southeast corner of Ray Road and 54th Street in west Chandler at 855 N. 54th St., Ste. 5. The menu oers pho, noodles, rice dishes, stir-fry and more. 480-825-7767. www.azphoandgrill.com

2 Restore Hyper Wellness + Cryother- apy opened a location at 2895 S. Alma School Road on Nov. 9. The wellness business oers whole-body cryotherapy, IV therapy and more. 480-999-4970. https://restore.com 3 Furniture Brat and U-Haul opened Nov. 18 at 425 E. Germann Road, Ste. 105, Gilbert. Furniture Brat sells furniture imported from around the world and can customize upholstery. It also fabricates

and sells container homes. A U-Haul dealership has been brought in as well so customers can transport pieces home. 480-821-5200. www.furniturebrat.com 4 Your CBD Store opened in November. The store oers hemp-derived products. Another location of Your CBD Store is in Gilbert. The store is located at 975 E. Riggs Road, Ste. 3, Chandler. 480-857- 5999. https://chandler0066.cbdrx4u.com 5 E.D. Marshall Jewelers opened a

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

E. CHANDLER HEIGHTS RD.

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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Gadzooks

ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

family-owned, and the company is based in North Carolina. The eatery also oers breakfast sandwiches and sundaes. 480-350-7763. www.duckdonuts.com 10 Gadzooks celebrated its one-year anniversary Dec. 20. The restaurant oers build-your-own Mexican classics, such as enchiladas and tacos, as well as soups and salads. Patrons can also get breakfast tacos. 209 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler. 602-279-5080. www.gadzooksaz.com 11 The Sicilian Butcher , a craft meatball and charcuterie bar, celebrated its one-year anniversary Dec. 19. Located at 3151 W. Frye Road, Chandler, this is the second location of the Sicilian Butcher in

LOCAL HOT SPOT

The Steelyard

ALEXA D’ANGELOCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

NOWOPEN Someburros opened a location in November at Chandler’s The Steelyard development. Located at 5095 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 1, Someburros oers breakfast, lunch and dinner with menu items ranging from breakfast burritos and tacos to traditional Mexican cuisine to salads and bowls. 480-597-6043. www.someburros.com Heartland Dental opened a location in late November at The Steelyard. The dental practice is now accepting patients and oers services including teeth

cleaning, X-rays and more. The location is at 4920 S. Alma School Road., Ste. 1. 866-929-0040. www.heartland.com Jersey Mike’s Sub s opened in December at The Steelyard. The eatery oers an array of sandwiches and subs. It is located at 5045 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. B-100, Chandler. 480-307-6314. www.jerseymikes.com COMING SOON F45 , a boutique gym, is scheduled to open in the near future at The Steelyard

development. The gym oers high- intensity workout classes. https://f45training.com Athletico Physical Therapy is scheduled to open in early 2021. The physical therapy oce oers clients physical therapy, pain therapy and therapy for back pain among other oerings. 480-566-8150. www.athletico.com Logic Nails is set to open in early 2021 at The Steelyard. The nail salon will provide manicure, pedicure and waxing services. A website and telephone number were not available as of press time.

the Valley. 480-573-8550. www.thesicilianbutcher.com

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CHANDLER EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

60 TRAN PORTATIONUPDATES W. BASELINE RD.

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

W. GUADALUPE RD.

2 Val Vista Drive widening The town is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. The result will be a six-lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street. Status: Base paving has started for the curb lane south of Chandler Heights. Project is approximately 45% complete. Timeline: March 2020-August 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: bonds, town of Gilbert funds and Maricopa Association of Governments funds

bound and southbound from Ocotillo to Powell Place. The first phase of work took place earlier this year. Status: Crews began work on Gilbert from Ocotillo to Powell on Nov. 9. Con- struction was in the north and south- bound directions. Timeline: November-Jan. 29 Cost: $4.77 million Funding sources: city of Chandler, Chandler USD RECENTLY COMPLETED 4 Alma School Road improvements Construction is complete on a project to expand Alma School Road to four lanes from Chandler Boulevard to Queen Creek Road. Status: The project began Aug. 20, and crews worked in both the north and southbound directions on Alma School from Loop 202 to Kingbird Drive. Timeline: Aug. 20-Nov. 20 Cost: $2.74 million Funding source: city of Chandler

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ONGOING PROJECTS 1 McClintock Drive, Kyrene Road bike lane additions The city of Chandler is planning to con- struct two new segments of bike lanes along A McClintock Drive and B Kyrene Road that will connect to the existing bike lane system at the Tempe city limits. Status: Crews began work on the project

July 13 and started with tree removal and utility potholing on the road, according to the city. The work is on both the north and south lanes of the roads. Timeline: July-March 5 Cost: $4.04 million Funding sources: federal grant, local match

3 Gilbert Road widening Chandler City Council on Sept. 17 ap- proved a $4.77 million contract with Sun- land Asphalt and Road Construction Inc. for the second phase of improvements on Gilbert Road from Ocotillo Road to Chan- dler Heights Road. The project will widen Gilbert to three through lanes north-

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF DEC. 14. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CHNNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

QUOTEOFNOTE

Camille Casteel to retire as Chandler USD superintendent in 2021

Chandler USDgrappleswith how to handle COVID19

Kirk D. Minkus, MD. Dr. Minkus has over 16 years of collective interventional radiology practice and training, and has performed over 40,000 procedures. Call Today! (480) 945-4343 Chandler USD board Jan. 13, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER CHANDLERUSD The Chandler USD governing board approved $142,026.50 for Wet Ones as an emergency procurement during a meeting Nov. 18. CHANDLERUSD On Nov. 18, the Chandler USD governing board approved the publication of the 2019-2020 school level reporting which includes the annual nancial report. CHANDLERUSD At a meeting Nov. 18, the governing board selected Board President Barb Mozdzen as the delegate for the Chandler USD Arizona School Board’s Association annual business meeting held on Dec. 3. MEETINGHIGHLIGHTS According to data from the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, as of Dec. 14, 75% of COVID-19 cases associated with school outbreaks have been in students. NUMBERTOKNOW “WE REALLYNEED PARENTS' HELP TO MONITOR THEIR STUDENTS ANDNOT SEND THEIR STUDENTS TO SCHOOLWHEN THEYARE SICK.” LARRY ROTHER, SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF PK12 EDUCATIONAL SERVICES 75%

SCHOOL LEVEL Elementary schools Junior high schools High schools SOURCE: CHANDLER USD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER PERCENTAGE OF ACTIVE CASES 2% 1.5% 1% COVID19 CLOSURES The district will close schools if the percent of positive cases reaches the below thresholds.

District ocials are recommending students and sta continue learning in person based on the number of COVID-19 cases reported at school sites across the district. The recommen- dation came during a study session Nov. 18 with the Chandler USD governing board. No nal decisions

Chandler USD Superintendent Camille Casteel announced in a letter to families Dec. 10 she will retire at the end of this school year, June 30, 2021. “It is time,” Casteel wrote in the letter to families and the public. “While this is one of the most dicult decisions I have had to make, after 50 years in CUSD, I feel the time is right.” Casteel joined the district in 1971.

Camille Casteel

She taught rst grade at both Erie and Knox elementary schools, according to the district. She became the district’s rst female principal in 1983, at Weinberg Elementary School. In 1986, she joined the district’s administrative team as the assistant superintendent. She was promoted to associate superintendent in 1991 and ve years later, in 1996, she was selected as the district’s rst-ever female superintendent. Casteel said she knows the district has a “great deal” to accomplish in her nal months as superintendent as the coronavirus pandemic continues to wreak havoc in communities. “I look forward to beginning the recovery and then handing the reins to CUSD’s next leader,” Casteel said. “I am condent the governing board will nd just the right person to succeed me.”

were made; rather, the board and district sta had a discussion on the district-specic COVID-19 data and how to handle potential surges at schools. Sta recommended schools that reach a certain percentage of active COVID-19 cases close for ve days, during which students would shift to virtual learning. The district recommended for elementary schools to close, they must reach a 2% rate, junior high schools must reach 1.5% and high schools reach 1% to close. Chandler USDvotes to oer temporary virtual option The Chandler USD governing board voted Dec. 9 to develop a plan to temporarily expand students’ virtual learning option through Google Meet for students in grades 7-12 beginning Jan. 5 through Jan. 15. This means CUSD teachers will teach from the classroom—where students will be present—and broadcast through Google Meet live to students whose families elected to keep them home immedi- ately following the holidays. Board Member Lindsay Love abstained from the vote.

CASTEEL’S CAREER IN CHANDLER USD

1971 Started as a rst grade teacher at Erie Elementary

1983 Named principal of Weinberg Elementary, which was then a new school

1986 Named assistant superintendent over elementary schools

1991 Named associate superintendent over K-12 schools

1996-2020 Served as superintendent

SOURCE: CHANDLER USDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Indications: • 50 years old or older • Previous/Current Smoker • Diabetic • High Blood Pressure

TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS GILBERT (Next to Mercy Gilbert Hospital) 3420 S Mercy Rd., Ste# 300 MESA (Just North of Banner Baywood Hospital) 140 S Power Rd., Ste# 102

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CHANDLER EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

HEALTH CARE Maricopa County plans for distributing coronavirus vaccine BY ALEXA D’ANGELO The Maricopa County Department of Public Health released its plan for the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine Dec. 7. Priority will be given to health care workers and residents at long-term care facilities, accord- ing to the county. “We have been developing detailed, multipronged plans in partnership with local hospital systems, fire departments, law enforcement, emergency manage- ment and other agencies across the county to prepare for a quick and efficient distribution of the vaccine as soon as it becomes available,” said Marcy Flanagan, director of Maricopa County Department of Public Health. Vaccine manufacturer Pfizer had its vaccine approved for emergency use Dec. 11, and trucks carrying the

Here is Maricopa County’s plan for COVID-19 vaccine distribution. 3 PHASES OF VACCINE DISTRIBUTION

PHASE 2 Spring 2021- summer 2021

PHASE 3 Summer 2021-beyond • Any remaining Phase 1 or 2 populations • General population

PHASE 1 December 2020-spring 2021

1C: • Adults older than 65 • Adults of any age with high- risk medical conditions

1B: • Health care workers not included in 1A • Adults in congregate settings • Law enforcement • Teachers and child care workers • Essential services/critical industry workers

1A: • Health care workers • Emergency medical services workers • Long-term care facility staff and residents

• Any remaining Phase 1 populations • Additional high-

risk/critical populations

• General

SOURCE: MARICOPA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

population

vaccine departed the facility Dec. 12 and 13 to get to the states for distri- bution. Maricopa County received the vaccine the week of Dec. 14 and it was planned that distribution would occur for front line health care workers at five points—includ- ing Chandler-Gilbert Community College—across the county. “By vaccinating these frontline workers first, we are helping to ensure that our health care sys- tem will stay strong with needed staffing, and in turn, our family members, friends, colleagues and

others in our community will be able to receive the health care they need when they need it most,” Flanagan said. The first dose of the vaccine will be distributed at five regional “points of dispensing” across the county in conjunction with Abrazo Health, Banner Health, Banner Del Web, Dignity Health and Honor Health over a distribution period of several weeks, Flanagan said. Following health care workers and long-term care residents receiving the vaccine, the county plans to

distribute the vaccine to adults in congregate settings, such as jails, prisons or medical facilities; law enforcement; teachers; and child care workers, essential services and critical industry workers. Following that, the county plans to distribute the vaccine to adults older than 65 and adults of any age with high-risk medical conditions. After those groups have been vacci- nated, the vaccine will be available to the general population—which the county estimates could happen in the spring or summer of 2021.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&COUNTY

News from Chandler & Maricopa County

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

NUMBER TOKNOW

1 in 10 county residents may have had COVID19, county study nds MARICOPA COUNTY The Maricopa County Department of Public Health announced Nov. 16 that an estimated 10.7% of county residents have detectable antibodies for COVID-19— translating to roughly 470,000 people. The results stem from an 11-day study conducted in mid-September by the Maricopa County Department of Public Health in partnership with Arizona State University and the Mayo Clinic that collected specimens from 260 participants in 169 households randomly selected from across the county to test for antibodies for the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a news release from the county. “MCDPH and ASU worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to implement a method that samples a small number of households in randomly selected communities that, when combined, represent all of Maricopa County,” read the release. “The CDC gave MCDPH and ASU a list of 29 com- munities that are representative of the entire county.” COVID19 SURVEY FINDINGS Key ndings from the survey, according to the news release, include: • For every case reported to the public health department, there were three to four cases that were not reported up to mid- September, when the survey was conducted. • The number of true infections is likely far higher than the number of people who are being tested for COVID-19. • There was a higher prevalence within households than across individuals, which supports evidence that infections cluster within households. SOURCE: MARICOPA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Chandler City Council approves recreational marijuana regulations CHANDLER Chandler City Council voted Dec. 10 to adopt an ordinance amending the city code to allow for the regulation of recreational marijuana. The ordinance allows the city to prohibit the consumption of marijuana on city property, repeals conicting ordinances and prohibits recreational marijuana retail sales and marijuana testing facilities in the city. The ordinance also introduces penalties for violating laws related to the consumption of marijuana. Proposition 207 was approved by voters in November and legal- izes the possession and consumption of recreational marijuana. The proposition allows cities and towns to regulate certain aspects of recreational marijuana.

$4.1M

At a meeting Dec. 10, Chandler City

Council approved the allocation of $4.1 million for rent, mortgage and utility assistance.

CITY HIGHLIGHTS

Chandler City Council Jan. 14, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov MEETINGSWE COVER CHANDLER City Council approved Dec. 10 the renaming of East Mini Park, 605 E. Erie St., to Vida Park. The Spanish translation for “vida” is “life,” and the name was chosen by an online vote of the Galveston neighborhood. CHANDLER Chandler City Council approved Dec. 10 the rezoning of an undeveloped portion of the southeast corner of Gilbert and Riggs roads from commercial to multifamily. CHANDLER Chandler City Council authorized Dec. 10 an agreement between the Chandler Police Department and the Arizona Department of Corrections to send new detention ocers to the Correctional Ocer Training Academy. The city of Chandler is allowing for expanded outdoor dining. (Alexa D'Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Chandler seeking redeveloper for vacant downtown building

W. CHANDLER BLVD.

E. BOSTON ST.

The city is seeking a redeveloper for a vacant site in downtown Chandler.

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CHANDLER The city of Chandler announced Dec. 2 that it is requesting proposals from qualied oerers for the redevelopment of a vacant site in downtown Chandler. The property is located at 51 E. Boston St. The project site is 3,000 square feet, with just under 2,000 square feet of interior space and an outdoor patio. The current zoning allows for retail, restaurant and entertainment uses. “The city’s desire is to identify a team that has vision, experience and the nancial strength and capacity to transform this property to deliver signicant, tangible and measurable social, cultural and economic impact to the city and the community,” the release said.

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CHANDLER EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

“I LIKE TO TAKE THINGS AND TWEAK IT AND MAKE IT OUROWN.” COOWNER CHRIS SCHLABAUGH

Central Pop oers gift packages, which the owners say are good for corporate orders.

Chris and Lisa Schlabaugh own Central Pop in Chandler. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

POPCORN FLAVORS Flavors at the store

Central Pop Popcorn shop blends avors to create unique tastes BY ALEXA D’ANGELO A fter living in the Midwest on and o throughout his life, Chris Schlabaugh found that when he moved to Arizona, the East Valley was missing something—popcorn shops. Chris and his wife, Lisa, set out to ll that gap

change regularly, with around 40 usually in stock. Some of the more popular avors are: • Lemon and white chocolate • Birthday cake • Buttery movie theater • Central Pop! Caramel • White cheddar • Cheddar pretzel ale

Schlabaugh said he likes to create new avors and work in the kitchen; Lisa is the popcorn lover in the family. “There are a lot of avor combinations that you can do with popcorn,” Schlabaugh said. “I like to take things and tweak it and make it our own. I made one on accident with dark chocolate and salted caramel, and it’s one of those ones we sell out of quickly every time.” Schlabaugh said that throughout the coronavirus pandemic, the shop’s regulars and corporate cus- tomers have kept the family-owned and -operated business aoat. “We are now starting to see our regulars come back into the store; they were doing curbside for a while,” Schlabaugh said. “People will tell me that they keep coming in because they don’t want to see us go out of business. A lot of our regulars disap- peared for a while, but they started trickling back in. We are just like any other small business struggling to keep aoat and make it work. We appreciate anyone who can come in and support us.”

Central Pop 1929 E. Ray Road, Ste. 6, Chandler 480-726-1887 www.centralpopalicious.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun. noon-6p.m.

and bring to life a storefront that sold popcorn in a variety of dierent avors—ranging from the super sweet to the super spicy. “There really isn’t a great deal of popcorn shops in the Valley or in the East Valley, so we wanted to give it a shot,” Schlabaugh said. “In the Midwest, you have these popcorn shops kind of everywhere, and when we saw how popular they were back there, we wanted to take a chance and do that here.” Central Pop oers dozens of popcorn avors to its customers and changes them up as often as possible, Schlabaugh said. “We get a lot of orders and calls from outside of Chandler, too; people who live in Phoenix [will] come into the store looking for their favorite avors,” Schlabaugh said.

E. RAY RD.

N

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Asian Ahi Tuna ($16) The restaurant’s menu includes dishes that are Asian, American and Italian.

DINING FEATURE

Lemon-rosemary chicken ($20) The Parlay Kitchen & Cocktails oers a variety of menu items.

The ParlayKitchen&Cocktails Restaurant oers handcrafted recipes, craft cocktails K yle Walters said he did not expect when he opened a restaurant in the “perfect spot” in Chandler that its rst year and a half in BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

The ParlayKitchen&Cocktails 1245 S. Price Road, Chandler 480-500-5247 www.theparlayaz.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-1 a.m., Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-1 a.m. SPECIALTY COCKTAILS The Parlay Kitchen & Cocktails oers 12 signature cocktails ranging frommargaritas to Old-Fashioneds to cosmopolitans. The restaurant and bar oers wine and beer—and even has a wine special on Wednesday when customers can get a charcuterie board with a bottle of wine.

the extent it was allowed under Gov. Doug Ducey’s orders. “The support was phenomenal from the com- munity,” Walters said. “Everyone stepped up and helped keep orders going. It was nice to keep business coming in while we worked our butts o.” The restaurant oers an array of menu items, including salads, burgers, sandwiches, salmon, steak, pasta and other dishes. The restaurant also boasts 12 signature cocktails, which Walters said are always made with the freshest ingredients and never made from pre-made mixes. Walters said The Parlay prioritizes its food and drink quality and atmosphere to keep happy customers coming back for more. “We have quality food, quality atmosphere and quality people,” Walters said. “When you choose to go out and eat at a place, you want to go out and be taken care of. I try to make sure that our sta spoils the heck out of everybody. Everyone should be treated like it’s their night to shine and be spoiled.”

CALL TO SCHEDULE 480.248.2440 The craft kitchen and cocktail restaurant did the only thing its owners could do: It closed for a few days, gured out a game plan and then got to work. The Parlay began oering delivery and to-go menu items, and the business kept its dining room open to business would turn out the way it has. The Parlay Kitchen & Cocktails opened in Chandler in May 2019 in Chandler’s Price Corridor— home to hundreds of jobs and very few restaurants. Walters said as the business neared its one-year anniversary, it was just hitting its stride. Then the coronavirus pandemic struck and forced restaurants and businesses across the Valley to adapt to a new reality. “We were headed into peak season in the spring when the pandemic started,” Walters said. “We got the rug pulled out from under us.”

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CHANDLER EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

2012, we started seeing planning and zoning cases come through for mul- tifamily again. Shovels weren’t in the ground for those projects until 2015 or 2016. So visually, you didn’t see a surge of multifamily in the area until then.” City officials, developers and hous- ing experts in the Valley say Chandler will continue to see an increased need for multifamily housing as the city continues to develop land set aside for employment, adding jobs to the city. “Employment drives housing,” Plan- ning and Zoning Commission Chair Rick Heumann said. “As we add more jobs to the city, we need to continue to add more places for those people to live. We don’t want to get into a place where we have people living inMesa or Queen Creek and commuting to their jobs in Chandler. We want people to live, work, eat and play in Chandler.” Matching inventoryanddemand Chandler, like cities and towns across the county, saw a multifamily housing boom in the 1980s, said Mark Stapp, a professor at Arizona State University and local real estate expert. Evenwith that boom, the development of single-family homes had histori- cally outpaced multifamily housing in Chandler, according to data from the city. Stapp said the two housing products were bound to flip as Chandler reached build-out. “Chandler is still evolving,” Stapp said. “But it has gotten to a point in its evolution where it is in a more mature stage of existence, where the city is running out of housing inventory and where large parcels of undevel- oped land just don’t exist anymore. When you have employment growth, like Chandler does, you need to have enough demand from users that you have to diversify your housing stock.” Before the Great Recession, Stapp said, multifamily housing was

More than 20 multifamily sites, accounting for roughly 4,000 units are proposed or underway in Chandler. Here is a map of those developments.

City Council approved Denied Proposed

MULTIFAMILY HOUSING BOOM IN CHANDLER

E. GUADALUPE RD.

2

3

10

4

NUMBER OF UNITS

ZONING CASE

1 Riata

300

2 Tremaine Park Townhouses

76

101

3 Uptown Commons

252

87

5

4 Village at College Park

40

17

5 Brighton Place 6 Chandler 101

53

200 340 420 291 262 200

13

12 11 10

16

15

9

6

7

1

7 District at Chandler

8

14

W. PECOS RD.

8 Town Frye

202

9 Alta Parklane

10 San Marcos Living 11 Chandler Residential 12 Nebraska Homes 13 COR Chandler

18

19

W. GERMANN RD.

16

291 212

20

14 Nevada St. and Commonwealth Ave.

15 Commonwealth Lofts

42

16 Waterfall

106 158 396 156

21

17 Cabana on Chandler 18 Evergreen Chandler 19 McQueen and Loop 202 20 Ocotillo Patio Villas 21 Pinelake Condominiums 22 Village at Chandler

32 93

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

22

N

108

condominiums, townhomes or, more commonly, apartments. “Once a city develops from a rural agrarian city to a suburban city, then it moves into the next stage of redevel- opment and infill,” Mayo said. “Mul- tifamily is a great component to that development cycle.” In 2019, according to data from the city, developers completed just under

1,500multifamily units. Mayo says that is a stark contrast to nearly a decade ago when the city was paralyzed by the effects of the Great Recession and no multifamily housingwas developed for about three years citywide. “Around 2012, we had a few things happening; our economy was starting to surge back; and we had continued employment growth,” Mayo said. “In

CONTINUED FROM 1

of the city of Chandler. “From development to more infill and redevelopment.” Developers have proposed 22 mul- tifamily housing projects consisting of about 4,000 units between 2018 and 2020. Multifamily housing can be

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

concentrated in the Valley to Tempe, Scottsdale and downtown Phoenix, with more suburban areas having mul- tifamily housing that was built in the 1980s and often not maintained. “There was no new multifamily in the suburban marketplaces,” he said. “It’s taken the maturation of Chandler, and it’s taken the investor and lend- ing community’s willingness to look at projects in those areas. Multifamily is the strongest product type for these suburban areas moving forward.” Mayo said Chandler has a low vacancy rate across its existing multi- family developments. “Oftentimes you’ll find that new developments are almost entirely rented out by the time they are com- plete,” Mayo said. Stapp said Chandler’s focus on bring- ing jobs to the city in the last decadehas increased the burden on the housing market, as seen in the city’s low inven- tory of single-family homes and low vacancy rates of multifamily housing. “The one thing Chandler has seen over the last decade is significant employment growth in technology and other higher wage-earning jobs,” Stapp said. “In order to be able to sus- tain economic development, you have to have a variety of housing types. You have them for mobility. People often start off their careers in an apartment or condo, then own a home and then in their later years, return to renting and multifamily housing so there is less upkeep. It’s a matter of lifestyle, and you have to have housing to cater to every lifestyle.” Developer Reed Porter, owner of New Village Home, got a new project approved in November for single-story, rentable units in Chandler. The project will be located at Elliot and Price roads, according to city documents. Porter said it will include 40 one-, two- and three-bedroom units. “This project is on anodd, thinparcel

that had a single home on it,” Porter said. “We do small, boutique neighbor- hoods of single-family, cottage-style homes as multifamily. We are doing infill projects in Chandler, and often neighbors react better to a multifamily project if it’s single-story and doesn’t necessarily look like traditional apart- ment complexes.” The first project like this Porter developed was in Chandler at Ray and McQueen roads. That success inspired this new one. “It creates a single-family living experience with the benefits of amulti- family community,” Porter said. “Chan- dler is perfect for that kind of project.” Multifamilyaffordability Many of the newer multifamily developments in Chandler have rents for one-bedroom apartments ranging from $1,300 to $1,600—what the city considers “luxury.” Stapp said, even with more multi- family developments, he believes cit- ies still need to find ways to address affordability, particularly for thosewho hold public-sector jobs like police, fire- fighters and teachers. “The problem everywhere in metro Phoenix is that we are not as affordable as people like to think we are,” Stapp said. “There is a significant portion of the population that is housing bur- dened,meaningmore than30%of their income is used on housing. It makes us less resilient to economic hardship and creates less diversity. Multifamily is not just housing for, quote-unquote, ‘poor people,’ but a lot of working poor often live inmultifamily housing. These peo- ple can be working multiple jobs, and still the ability to afford to pay for a quality place is very difficult.” Stapp said rents have been on the rise across the Valley, and he expects that trend to continue. Many of the new developments, including in Chandler, have community amenities

The city uses a formula to project the economic effect of new mutifamily housing. Projected revenue comes from taxes and projected expenses are related to city costs per person.

ECONOMIC EFFECT

Expenses Revenues

MONTHLY RENT

LUXURY $1,600+

AVERAGE

AFFORDABLE

$1,200

$900

JOBS SUPPPORTED

53

39

30

$3.5M

$3M

$2.5M

$2M

$1.5M

$1.M

$0.5M

0

NET REVENUE

$800K

$520K

$310K

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

such as pools, concierge services and full-service gyms. Stapp said people pay more a month for the experience and lifestyle of living in a big, multi- family community and in a unit outfit- ted with the newest finishes. “Multifamily is not about housing ‘the poor.’ That’s a real misconception,” Stapp said. Heumann said he would like to see the city work with the private sector to bring about housing specifically for teachers, police and firefighters— among other working class profes- sions—to improve Chandler’s housing affordability. “The challenge is that’s not what is getting built,” Heumann said. “I’m not talking about Section 8 housing, but it’s housing for teachers, firemen, retail workers and more who want to live in

Chandler close to where they work, and they are being driven out of the city because of pricing.” Mayo said the city continues tomon- itor the housing needs of the commu- nity. But, Mayo said, while multifamily is outpacing single-family housing, he expects single-family homes will con- tinue to be built on the smaller land parcels left throughout the city as well. “We kind of keep one eye on today and one eye on the future,” Mayo said. “That’s how we guide development. Right now, we are in line with where we expected to be on the path, and we are headed were we are expected to go.”

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CHANDLER EDITION • DECEMBER 2020

A LOOK INSIDE theproject

Preparing for future needs

The Arizona Department of Transportation will begin a years- long project in 2021 on I-10 along the Broadway Curve to widen a stretch of the freeway to 10 lanes in each direction.

Transportation ocials say the widening of the interstate is necessary to prevent even more trac in the future, with an estimated 25% increase in the number of drivers by 2040.

25% increase in trac by 2040

Current weekday trac at the Broadway Curve, nearly

143

B

17

300,000

W. UNIVERSITY DR.

Projected weekday trac at the Broadway Curve in 2040

D

10

375,000

SOURCE: MARICOPA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

E. ROESER RD.

A

trac and, specically, cut down on the amount of time that people ulti- mately will spend commuting or try- ing to access this particular area or navigate through this particular part of our region.” Herrmann said ADOT expects to nalize the construction contract by early 2021, and the project is slated to begin in mid- to late 2021 and take about three years to complete. The project is expected to cost about $660 million, but the nal cost will be determined in the negotiation pro- cess, Herrmann said. Funding for the project stems from Proposition 400, a dedicated sales tax for transportation approved by Maricopa County voters in 2004, Highway User Revenue Fund and federal funds. Project details Throughout the course of the proj- ect, construction crews will widen I-10 from four to six general-purpose lanes and two HOV lanes between 24th Street and US 60, according to ADOT. Herrmann said ADOT will be build- ing a “collector-distributor” road sys- tem between Baseline Road and 40th Street to separate local and through trac on I-10. Drivers getting on or o the freeway in these spots will stay in the new lanes to get on and o the

CONTINUED FROM 1

Project area

E. SOUTHERN AVE.

TomHerrmann said. “If we were to do nothing, we would be approaching a gridlock.” Construction will take place on I-10 between I-17 and Loop 202, including the Broadway Curve. The project will aect freeways in Phoenix, Chandler, Tempe and the town of Guadalupe. The Broadway Curve project marks the state’s rst major freeway recon- struction eort, Herrmann said. “This is a much-needed improve- ment to I-10,” Herrmann said. “The Broadway Curve sees about 300,000 vehicles a day and is the second-busi- est section of Arizona freeways.” According to data from ADOT, o- cials expect the number of drivers on this segment of the freeway to growby 25% by 2040. The project is expected to save drivers 2.5 million hours annu- ally otherwise spent in trac, accord- ing to the Maricopa Association of Governments, the entity responsible for planning Maricopa County’s major highway improvements. Jenn Daniels, former Gilbert mayor and current member of the Arizona State Transportation Board, said the project is a “massive undertaking.” “Ultimately this project will improve access at businesses,” Daniels said. “It will help with the weekday

PROJECT DETAILS

60

LANE CHANGES IN EACH DIRECTION

A ADOT plans to add a collector-distributor road system between Baseline Road and SR 143. Drivers entering and exiting I-10 in this area will use the lanes as a transition between the main freeway lanes and surface streets. Only drivers traveling the entire distance between Baseline and SR 143 or beyond will use the I-10 main lanes.

E. BASELINE RD.

Existing New

W. GUADALUPE RD.

+1

+2 +2

C

W. ELLIOT RD.

B ADOT plans to widen I-10 to six general- purpose lanes and two HOV lanes in each direction between US 60 and 24th Street. C ADOT plans to add a fourth general-purpose lane in each direction between US 60 and Ray Road. D ADOT will modify connections between I-10 and SR 143 and Broadway Road to improve trac ow and create HOV lane connections.

W. WARNER RD.

10

E. CHANDLER BLVD.

202

SOURCE: ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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