Bay Area Edition | May 2021

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 10  MAY 21JUNE 24, 2021

ONLINE AT

Billion-dollar proposal League City, others to consider funding regional drainage work

THE FUTURE OF

BY JAKE MAGEE

A consultant has presented over $1.6 billion worth of potential regional ood solutions for the Bay Area. Consulting rm Freese and Nichols came up with the proposed projects after a year of research of the Clear Creek and Dickinson Bayou watersheds. As communities fund local drainage projects and potentially part of the $32 billion coastal barrier in Gal- veston, local municipalities will have to consider how to aord additional regional ooding xes. “We always knew this was going to be a lot of hard work followed by another order ofmagnitude of harder work,” said Chuck Wolf, an associate with Freese and Nichols. “The funding side of this is a big challenge.” CONTINUED ON 20 Consultant Freese and Nichols has presented over $1.6 billion worth of potential regional ood projects in the Lower Clear Creek and Dickinson Bayou watersheds. Dickinson Bayou detention: $220M Potential projects

Construction of roads, lights and other infrastructure was completed in Phase 1 of the Houston Spaceport at Ellington Airport in December, prompting aerospace companies to locate to the spaceport. COURTESY ARTURO MACHUCA Houston Spaceport growing as ocials draw attention to industry

BY JAKE MAGEE

companies, Axiom Space and Collins Aerospace, are preparing to break ground, and a third development will be announced in June. City leaders are excited by the progress the local aerospace industry has made in recent years, and they want that growth to continue to ramp up. “[Our goal is] to be the global leader in space— home of the space economy,” said Bob Mitchell, president of the Bay Area Houston Economic Part- nership. “We want to be all of it.” Attracting national aerospace companies TexSpace is the brainchild of Mitchell and CONTINUED ON 18

Among the rst words said from the moon in 1969 were, “Houston, ... the eagle has landed.” Will “Houston” be therstword spokenby therst person towalk onMars? This question has prompted Bay Area ocials to act. The Bay Area Houston Economic Partnership, which works to drive development in the Clear Lake area and beyond, has announced TexSpace, a new nonprot that will work to make state leaders recog- nize Houston’s growing aerospace industry. Meanwhile, the Houston Spaceport, located at Ellington Airport, now has infrastructure in place to allow for aerospace companies. Two such

Clear Creek conveyance improvements: $275M Dickinson Bayou bypass channel: $280M FM 2351 or I-45 tunnel: $875M-$975M

Total: $1.6B- $1.7B

SOURCE: FREESE AND NICHOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

League City gives land to Friendswood

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BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

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ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: Flooding is of great concern for many of our readers, especially those in the Clear Creek and Dickinson Bayou watersheds. Drainage projects are costly and time consuming but remain at the forefront of Bay Area residents’ and ocials’ minds. Our front-page story covers the multimillion-dollar projects proposed to alleviate regional ooding. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

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FROM JAKE: If you’re like me, you think one of the coolest things about the Clear Lake area is its aerospace industry. If so, you’ll be excited to learn this industry is only expanding— and rapidly—in the area. Read our front-page story to see what the future of spaceight holds in Clear Lake. Jake Magee, EDITOR

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CORRECTION: Volume 3, Issue 9 Impacts, Page 6 Cloud Wine & Spirits is located at 3010 S. Gulf Freeway, Ste. G, League City.

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BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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AEROSPACE AVE.

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ARMAND BAYOU NATURE CENTER

SEABROOK

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College of the Mainland

LAKEWOOD YACHT CLUB DR

LARA ESTEPHAN/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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rocket engines to travel 12 times faster than the speed of sound at an altitude of 150,000 feet. The company is in talks with city leaders to build its permanent headquarters and testing facility on spaceport grounds. www.venusaero.com 6 Hartz Chicken will open in the coming months at Borden’s Gully, 301 W. FM 517, Dickinson, according to the Bay Area Houston Economic Partnership. A timeline has not been established, but a new 7,500-square-foot retail center will be built at the site, and 4,800 square feet of the development will be available for rent. Hartz Chicken, which has dozens of locations in the Greater Houston area, serves chicken in a variety of styles along with sides including mashed potatoes and corn. www.hartz-chicken.com 7 Lefty’s Famous Cheesesteaks, Hoagies & Grill has leased 2,691 square feet at League City Plaza, 176 S. Gulf Freeway, League City. A timeline for the restaurant’s opening has not been revealed. In addition to cheesesteaks and hoagies, Lefty’s serves burgers, corned beef, cold cuts, hot dogs, salads, desserts and more. Most Lefty’s locations are in Michigan, but a few are in California and Houston. www.eatleftys.com 8 On April 27, League City City Council approved a special-use permit to allow Caliber Collision to open at 871 W. FM 517, League City. The location, which officials said will open this year, will be 14,700 square feet with 10 service bays to allow the business to repair glass windshields and structural damage to vehicles, install and align vehicle compo- nents, provide detailing and more. www.calibercollision.com

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NOWOPEN 1 UOffice Executive Suites opened a location at 711 Bay Area Blvd., Web- ster, in February. The business provides coworking spaces to its clients along with free Wi-Fi, 24/7 building access, coffee and tea, mail services, printers, and more. UOffice has also taken precautions to make its locations safer during COVID-19. www.uofficesuites.com 2 World Famous Daiquiris & Margari- tas To Go opened May 1 on the corner of Egret Bay Boulevard and NASA Parkway near Space Center Houston, according to the business’s website. The establish- ment at 1010 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. A, Houston, offers 12- to 64-ounce cock- tails, including nine types of daiquiris

and nine types of margaritas, to consume inside or purchase at the drive-thru window. This is the business’s second Bay Area location, the other being on Clear Lake City Boulevard. 281-532-6457. www.goworldfamous.com 3 Gordo Niño’s opened in mid-April inside the Chevron gas station at 1419 E. NASA Parkway, Houston. The Mexican eatery offers various burritos; tacos; all-day breakfast; and “killa-dillas,” which can be served with the signature bright purple Lean Sauce. 281-280-0090. www.facebook.com/gordoninos 4 Special Strong began serving clients April 1 out of the Anytime Fitness loca- tion at 4420 W. Main St., League City. The business offers personal, group and

virtual adaptive fitness programs for those with mental, physical and cognitive challenges who want to socialize and improve their health and wellness. South- east Houston location owner Mike Lutey is the company’s first franchisee, he said; this is the third Special Strong location in Texas and the first in Houston. 832-856-0158. www.specialstrong.com COMING SOON 5 California-based space company Venus Aerospace is relocating its office and operations to Houston and is leasing an office at Ellington Airport, home of the Houston Spaceport, 11602 Aerospace Ave., Houston. Venus is developing a “spaceplane” that is capable of using

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & JAKE MAGEE

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Lenox Family Court

Lone Star Flight Museum

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

COURTESY LONE STAR FLIGHT MUSEUM

9 Axiom Space Inc. has leased 32,000 square feet of office space at 1290 Her- cules Ave., Houston, bringing the newly renovated Hercules II office building at 63,700 square feet to 100% occupancy. Axiom Space is also planning to build a 386,000-square-foot facility on a 14- acre plot of land in the Phase 1 area of the Houston Spaceport at the Ellington Air- port. At the facility, Axiom plans to build the world’s first commercial space station module that will launch in late 2024 and hook into the International Space Station. www.axiomspace.com EXPANSIONS 10 College of the Mainland ’s new STEAM and administration buildings were unveiled April 30. Additionally, the college broke ground on its planned Industrial Careers building. The college at 1200 N. Amburn Road, Texas City, is “laying the foundation for the future” with these buildings, which were funded through the college’s 2018 bond program, a press re- lease reads. 409-938-1211. www.com.edu ANNIVERSARIES 11 Assistance League Resale Shop , 100 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. 80, Web- ster, celebrated its 10-year anniversary through a “Silver Celebration” that began May 5. The resale shop—which has a re- freshed look—cleaned, polished and sold silver jewelry and serving pieces in antici- pation of Mother’s Day. The shop opened in May 2010 but was unable to celebrate its 10th anniversary last year because the business was closed for months due to COVID-19. Assistance League of the Bay

Area is a nonprofit organization that funds local philanthropic programs and is fund- ed in part by the shop. 281-554-2594. www.assistanceleagueba.org 12 Keels and Wheels celebrated its 25th annual Concours D’Elegance at 2322 Lakewood Yacht Club Drive, Seabrook, on May 1 and 2. The event brings together the country’s largest collection of classic cars and vintage wooden boats over the course of the weekend with awards given to distinguished cars or boats in various classes, according to the Keels and Wheels website. The anniversary celebration included the cars featured in the 2019 film “Ford v Ferrari,” and a new event logo was designed to commemorate 25 years of shows. www.keels-wheels.com IN THE NEWS 13 On March 25, Space Center Houston , 1601 E. NASA Parkway, Houston, unveiled new signs recognizing Boeing for its local support of aerospace. The honor was due to Boeing investing more than $2 million to fund STEM programs for youth and the company’s support of Space Center Houston’s Independence Plaza exhibit. During the event, local female students participating in the Boeing-sponsored Girls STEM Pathway program spoke with space industry leaders about their research and experiences. 281-244-2100. www.spacecenter.org, www.boeing.com 14 On April 24, the League Park basket- ball court was named the Lenox Family Court during a ceremony that included Lenox family members from across Texas. The court at 512 Second St., League City, is now a tribute to members of the Le- noxes, a local family of basketball players

USA Ninja Challenge opened May 1 in Webster.

COURTESY USA NINJA CHALLENGE

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN USA Ninja Challenge opened with classes at 309 Ibis St., Webster, on May 1. The business allows children ages 4-17 to play and train in a gym full of swinging ropes, monkey bars, climbing walls, rope walls and other equipment designed to make participants feel like a ninja. The business oers classes for children and teenagers that teach tness, agility and life skills. USA Ninja Challenge also hosts various camps and parties for birthdays, fundraisers, graduations and other life events. 346-336-4652. www.ninjawebster.com who played for area high schools, Texas A&M University, Texas State University and the NBA. League City resident Lynn Davis, who knew the Lenoxes, spearhead- ed the effort to rename the court, and League City City Council approved the idea in September. 281-554-1000. www.leaguecity.com 15 Lone Star Flight Museum , 11551 Aerospace Ave., Houston, was one of a

The business offers classes for children.

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few stops for the historic B-29 Superfor- tress known as “Doc.” The bomber, which is one of only two B-29 Superfortresses built by the Boeing Co. that is still flying today, was on display at the museum May 5-9. Patrons were able to pay to tour and fly in the B-29 over the week. The plane also stopped in Arkansas and Louisiana for tours before stopping in Houston. Boeing has a presence in the Clear Lake area. 346-708-2517. www.lonestarflight.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES League City, Webster set to adjust city boundaries for North Landing Boulevard extension project

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE

ONGOING PROJECTS

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League City will give up some of its land to Webster to help make a proposed road extension a reality. For years, League City has had plans to extend Landing Boulevard where it intersects with FM 518 west of I-45. When constructed, North Landing will go north from the intersection over Clear Creek before turning east at a roundabout to intersect with I-45 in Webster. League City will pay about $28.1 million of the approximately $65 million project. The Texas Department of Transportation is paying about $31.3 million of the project, and Webster is paying $5.6 million. “They’ve always said they’d pay their pro-rata share,” said League City City Manager John Baumgartner, who noted Webster years ago indicated it would pay for the east-west portion of the extended road. Agreeing to pay for a portion of the road, Webster ocials asked League City if the two cities could alter their boundaries a bit. Webster leaders want the entirety of the east-west road within its city limits, Baumgart- ner said. “They want a boundary adjust- ment to put all that road in their community,” he said. “We as cities try to create logical boundaries, [and Webster’s request] made sense to us.” Project Management Director Angie Steelman said the deal makes sense to ensure the project is fully completed. “We didn’t want to build a road to

NORTH LANDING BOULEVARDEXTENSION Both League City and Webster will pay for the extension of North Landing Boulevard. The two cities will alter their boundaries so the east-west portion of the road Webster is paying for will be in Webster city limits. An Exxon gas station in League City will end up in Webster due to the adjustment.

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Butler Road and Turner Street reconstruction

On May 3, through trac opened at the intersection of Butler Road and Turner Street. There is ongoing construction with possible intermit- tent lane closures until the project is complete. Turner from Hobbs Road to Butler and Butler from Turner to Sedona Drive were reconstructed from two-lane asphalt roads to concrete. Timeline: November 2019-spring 2022 Cost: $4.04 million Funding source: city of League City

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nowhere,” she said. There is an Exxon gas station within League City that will end up in Webster’s city limits after the land swap is nalized. League City ocials said it makes sense to allow the gas station to become a part of Webster. “The gas station in League City and everything else [around it] in Webster didn’t quite make sense to us,” Baumgartner said. League City City Council in mid- April had an agenda item to approve the land swap. It was tabled at city sta’s request to allow Webster to get some things in order. It has not yet gone before City Council again. The project will alleviate con- gestion in League City by giving motorists another north-south road

to reach I-45. FM 518 between Land- ing and I-45 is regularly congested, but if North Landing can alleviate even 25% of the tens of thousands of vehicles that travel FM 518 daily, it will make a signicant impact, Baumgartner said. The extension will require building a bridge over Clear Creek. Addition- ally, the road will be near residences, a petroleum pipeline, a power line corridor and other challenges. “It’s a dicult web to weave it through,” Baumgartner said. Construction could begin as early as the second half of 2022, Baumgartner said. “The community’s been patient,” he said. “We’re all ready for some change out there on 518.”

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League City Parkway improvements This project will add an additional left turn bay on League City Parkway to Brittany Lakes Drive and Fennigan Lane and a trac signal. The con- tractor removed the concrete lining for the existing drainage channel to install improved infrastructure. Timeline: March-October Cost: $1.9 million Funding source: city of League City

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 11. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

DEVELOPMENT League City gives land to Friendswood

New

League City has agreed to give Friendswood about 29 acres of land. In exchange, League City will be given 50% of the land’s annual property tax revenue over the next 20 years.

LAND

League City City Council approved the itemApril 13. League City Council Member Hank Dugie said the development could do a well and septic system instead of hooking into the city’s water line but concluded the deal was a good one for League City. “If there was [a way to get value from the property], I’d say let’s keep it and turn it into something,” he said. League City Mayor Pat Hallisey said Friendswood should pay for the land, to which Hoover said League City is getting a good deal. If the property stayed within League City’s boundaries, the city would not generate enough property tax revenue to oset the cost of servicing the area. By getting 50% of the property tax rev- enue without having to pay for utilities or infrastructure for the area, League City is making more from the deal than it would have otherwise, Hoover said. “The reality is we’re getting a lot more than what it’s going to cost to service those houses,” he said.

BY JAKE MAGEE

League City has given up nearly 30 acres of land to Friendswood in exchange for some of the property tax revenue generated by the move. The Avalon Project is a residential development along the boundary of League City and Friendswood. Due to detention ponds in the area, it is “infea- sible” for League City to build infra- structure such as roads and water lines nearby, according to city documents. Additionally, it is dicult for League City emergency services to reach the area, said David Hoover, director of planning and development. Friendswood requested League City oer 29 acres of the proposed devel- opment footprint belonging to League City to Friendswood. In exchange, Friendswood will pay 50% of the annual property taxes generated from the acreage to League City for the next 20 years. Friendswood City Council approved the rst reading of the itemApril 5 and the second and nal reading May 3, and

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Avalon development Land swap acreage Old Friendswood and League City border

THE REALITY IS WE’RE GETTINGA LOTMORE THAN WHAT IT’S GOING TO COST TO SERVICE THOSE HOUSES. DAVID HOOVER, LEAGUE CITY DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Galveston County, Clear Creek ISD & League City

Vaccination site atWalter Hall Park ‘a real success’

Clear Creek ISD incumbent out in local election

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

GETTING THE SHOT Now that the mass vaccination site is closed, officials are focusing on providing shots through clinics in various parts of Galveston County. 1 UTMB Health League City campus 2 UTMB 3 Galveston County Health District

GALVESTON COUNTY As coronavirus vaccines became more widely available across Texas this spring, leaders in Bay Area public health ensured Galveston County residents would have broader access to the shots by establishing a vaccination hub in League City. Walter Hall Park in League City was transformed in mid-January to allow residents to drive up and receive a COVID-19 vaccine. The site operated until May 1, when demand had significantly decreased, Galves- ton County Local Health Authority Philip Keiser said. About 43% of the county’s population age 12 and older had been fully vaccinated as of May 17, according to state data. While the county will continue smaller-scale vaccination efforts, the eventual lack of a need for a large-scale site

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CLEAR CREEK ISD Newcomer Jeffrey Larson won against incum- bent Page Rander for the CCISD board District 4 position on election day May 1. Larson received 307 votes, or 54% of the vote, and Rander got 261. For District 5, incumbent Jay Cunningham received 1,406 votes, or 62%. Christine Parizo got 841 votes, and Keith Esthay got 10. For at-large Position A, Jonathan Cottrell won with 3,264 votes, or 48%. Kevin Oditt received 2,716. Michael Creedon got 568, and Marlene Montesinos got 317. CCISD does not have runoff elections. A recount has been called for District 5. Meanwhile, Nassau Bay City Council incumbent Don Matter won re-election with 74% of the ballots cast in his favor against challenger Don Hollowell. CCISD ELECTION RESULTS

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SOURCE: GALVESTON COUNTY HEALTH DISTRICT/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

indicates the Walter Hall hub was effective, Keiser said. “We view [the Walter Hall site] as a real success,” Keiser said. Staff and volunteers from Gal- veston County Judge Mark Henry’s office, the Galveston County Health District and beyond were able to provide doses to locals at increasing rates as operations were stream- lined over time, Keiser said. More than 100,000 shots went into arms

at the Walter Hall site. The county will now continue providing vaccines through various clinics, and Keiser encouraged those who have been hesitant to get vaccinated. “It’s time to get your vaccine,” he said. “We know it’s safe; we’ve given it to hundreds of thousands of people in our community here in Galveston, and we haven’t seen terrible side effects.”

League City City Council rezones land to promote commercial development

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BY JAKE MAGEE

permissions due to the land being zoned office commercial instead of general commercial, said David Hoover, planning and development director for League City. Most of the uses within the office commercial-zoned area are noncon- forming. According to a city memo, properties in the area include a gymnasium, warehouse, two single-family homes, an air condi- tioning business, an ATM kiosk and more, and the office commercial designation does not match the

DISTRICT 4

LEAGUE CITY With minimal discussion, City Council on April 27 approved rezoning about 15 acres of land to make the properties already there conform to the city’s code and make way for similar uses in the area. About a year ago, the city was approached with an idea to build a business on the south side of West FM 646 and west of Hwy. 3. Staff realized the business would not be allowed without special

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Larson (54%)

Rander (46%)

“character” of the area. Most of the land surrounding this area is already zoned general commercial, Hoover said. “Staff is requesting the zoning change to allow for a wider range of commercial uses on these parcels and to make the zoning more con- sistent with existing development,” the memo said.

DISTRICT 5

Cunningham (62%) Esthay (1%)

Parizo (37%)

AT-LARGE POSITION A

Cottrell (48%) Creedon (8%)

Oditt (39%) Montesinos (5%)

SOURCE: CLEAR CREEK ISD/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Clear Creek ISDboard approves new robotics, coding programs CLEAR CREEK ISD Starting in the 2022-23 school year, three CCISD elementary schools will be home to new robotics and coding programs. games, officials said. The last component is “Minecraft: Education Edition,” which will allow students to learn how to code, develop a deeper understanding of setting, learn about perime- ters and more, officials said. BY JAKE MAGEE

Clear Creek ISD board of trustees meets at 6 p.m. the fourth Monday of each month at 1955 W. NASA Blvd., Webster. Watch online at www.ccisd.net/boardmeeting. League City City Council meets at 6 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 400 W. Walker St., League City. Watch at www.facebook.com/ leaguecitytexas. MEETINGSWE COVER

There will be three components to the immersion programs. One will be VEX Robotics, which teaches students how to make simple machines, such as small, magnet-based vehicles, officials said. Scratch is a program students will use to introduce them to coding. They will be able to create simple online

In 2021-22, CCISD will establish steering committees to begin curriculum development, professional learning and implantation of sample lessons; the programs will be implemented by 2022-23 and expand to other campuses, officials said.

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BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

GUIDE

Local rescue shelters, vets and dog parks

Pet Guide 2021 Bay Area With warm weather returning, residents will soon be out and about with their four-legged family members in tow. See the guide below to learn where to rescue a pet, get them treated and play with them.

COMPILED BY COLLEEN FERGUSON & HALEY MORRISON

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Animal control and rescues 1 Animal Alliance of Galveston County 1014 Bayou Road, La Marque 409-933-1600 www.animalalliancetx.org 2 Bayou Animal Services 3100 Deats Road, Dickinson 281-337-3117 www.bayouanimalservices.org 3 Galveston County Animal Resource Center 3412 25th Ave. N, Texas City 409-948-2485 www.gchd.org/animal-services/ animal-control 4 League City Animal Control 755 W. Walker St., League City

281-554-1377 www.leaguecity.com/lcas Mutt Mesh Animal Rescue No fixed address muttmeshinfo@gmail.com www.facebook.com/muttmeshanimalrescue

www.petco.com

1911 W. League City Parkway, League City 281-316-6569 www.banfield.com/veterinarians/tx/ league-city/aaq 10 Bay Creek Animal Clinic 1236 E. Main St., League City 281-332-3051 www.baycreekanimalclinic.com 11 Bayside Animal Hospital 960 Lawrence Road, Kemah 713-344-1570 www.bayside-ah.com 12 Clear Springs Animal Hospital 3490 W. Main St., League City 281-332-9194 www.facebook.com/ clear-springs-animal-hospital- 159448320743835 13 Egret Bay Veterinary Hospital

Clinics and vets 6 Animal House Veterinary Hospital 2640 E. League City Parkway, Ste. 130, League City 281-334-3743 www.myanimalhousevets.com 7 Animal Kingdom Pet Hospital 551A League City Parkway, League City 281-506-0766 www.akph.net 8 Animal Medical Group 2011 Louisiana Ave., League City 281-332-5839 www.facebook.com/ animal-medical-group-122730214452630 9 Banfield Pet Hospital

Ranger’s Reach No fixed address rangersreach@gmail.com

www.rangersreach.org Second Chance Pets No fixed address pets2adopt@yahoo.com www.secondchancepets.org 5 Petco - Clear Lake Cat and dog adoption events are held weekly on Saturdays. 2410 Bay Area Blvd., Houston 281-480-3442

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BayArea Pet Guide 2021

That Pain... DOESN’T HAVE TO WAIT

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League City Animal Control

Marina Bay Animal Hospital

At Houston Physicians’ Hospital, we take joint care seriously. In fact, it is the first facility in Houston to earn Hip and Knee Replacement Certification from DNV.

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

COURTESY MARINA BAY ANIMAL HOSPITAL/LAKEFIELD VETERINARY GROUP

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Bark Park at Countryside

Friendswood PetSafe Dog Park

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

COURTESY GS&F ADVERTISING

Southeast 1108 Gulf Freeway S., Ste. 280, League City 281-332-1678 www.vcahospitals.com/animal -emergency-southeast-calder-road Dog parks 21 Bark Park at Countryside 501 N. Bay Area Blvd., League City 281-554-1180 www.leaguecity.com/3014/bark-park-at- countryside 22 COMING SOON Eastside Dog Park (unofficial name) 1001 E. League City Parkway, League City 281-554-1180 www.leaguecity.com 23 Friendswood PetSafe Dog Park 300 Briarmeadow Ave., Friendswood 281-996-3220 www.ci.friendswood.tx.us/261/dog-park 24 Independence Dog Park 3449 Pearland Parkway, Pearland 281-412-8900 www.pearlandtx.gov/departments /parks-recreation/parks/dog-parks 25 Nassau Bay Dog Park 18900 Upper Bay Road, Houston 281-333-4211 www.nassaubay.com/499/dog-park

1260 E. League City Parkway, Ste. 1000, League City 832-632-1595 www.egretbayvethosp.com 14 Forest Lake Animal Clinic 3942 NASA Parkway, Seabrook 281-326-2576 www.forestlakeanimalclinic.com 15 League City Animal Clinic 2310 W. Main St., League City 281-332-0644 www.league-clinic.edan.io 16 Marina Bay Animal Hospital 3030 Marina Bay Drive, League City 281-334-2888 www.marinabayanimalhospital.com 17 Oaks Veterinary Clinic 220 Hwy. 3, League City 281-332-9180 www.oaksvetclinic.com 18 Safari Veterinary Care Clinic 2402 Marina Bay Drive, League City 281-332-5612 www.safarivet.com 19 SNIP of Texas Spay/Neuter 2095 W. Main St., League City 281-724-9111 www.snipoftx.org 20 VCA Animal Emergency Hospital

Why wait another day to find the solution for your joint pain? Call our Joint Solutions Center today

281-940-3102 or visit HPHjoint.com

Proud to be physician owned. Houston Physicians’ Hospital complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. Houston Physicians’ Hospital cumple con las leyes federales de derechos civiles aplicables y no discrimina por motivos de raza, color, nacionalidad, edad, discapacidad o sexo.

13

BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

Maverick oers several dierent types of nishes for remodels.

JAKE MAGEECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

FOUR INONE Maverick Remodeling & Construction does four dierent types of work. Remodeling

BUSINESS FEATURE

Bobby Joe “B.J.” Stampley openedMaverick Remodeling & Construction in 2006.

The business remodels everything but homes’ gutters. Customers can choose new ooring, cabinets, countertops, paint and beyond—Maverick does it all. Remediation After a ood or re, Maverick will x up severely damaged houses. After the February freeze, Maverick remediated about 50 area homes. Construction For the rst time, Maverick is getting into building new homes. The company will build homes for Oak Alley Estates, a Seabrook subdivision. Buy and sell Maverick will buy outdated houses, x them up and sell them.

COURTESY MAVERICK REMODELING & CONSTRUCTION

MaverickRemodeling&Construction Husband and wife make living building dream homes W hen Bobby Joe “B.J.” Stampley was a high school drummer just starting his music career, he had no clue where life living,’” B.J. said. Kaysie remembers talking him into it. “I said, ‘Why are you working for somebody else making them rich when you’re good at this?’” Kaysie said. BY JAKE MAGEE

would take him. Now, decades later, B.J. runs Maverick Remod- eling & Construction, a Seabrook business that transforms homes from the inside out. “I like turning ugly into beautiful,” B.J. said. In the 1970s, B.J. was a sta drummer for “Louisiana Hayride,” a country music radio and television show that was the career launching point for several performers, including Elvis Presley. B.J. comes from a family of musicians and wanted to pursue drumming. In the 1980s, B.J. worked for a door builder, which is where he learned many of the skills he uses today. After two years, he quit to sell boats in Houston, he said. As a boat salesman, B.J. spent time buying old homes, xing them up while living in them and then selling them. Around this time he met his wife, Kaysie Stampley, who was a real estate agent. “She saw one of the houses that I remodeled, and she said, ‘You’re good. You need to do this for a

After marrying, B.J., with support from Kaysie, decided to pull the trigger on starting Maverick in 2006. He sold his motorcycle for $6,000 and used that money to buy tools and launch his business. Kaysie is a degreed chef, which gives her an edge when designing kitchens, something Kaysie loves to do. Often, B.J. will take measurements in a home and send a rough sketch to Kaysie, who uses a computer program to map out a visual redesign. The two enjoy owning a business together. “She’s my partner in life, and she’s my partner in business,” B.J. said. “And like we both say, we don’t need no more partners.” Despite the business’s success and growth from four total employees to 14 to 28 today, the Stamp- leys have no plans to expand beyond the Clear Lake area. There is too much work to be done locally to branch out farther, B.J. said. “It’s a lot. You have to really want to do it,” he said. “We love it.”

MaverickRemodeling& Construction 4104 NASA Parkway, Seabrook 281-326-8800 www.maverickremodeling.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

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of advertisers surveyed rate their overall experience with Community Impact Newspaper good, very good or excellent. 97%

of advertisers were likely to recommend Community Impact Newspaper to another business. 78%

Advertiser feedback “Had best luck with our ads in the Impact.” “The communication was great throughout the entire process.” “Community Impact is the ONLY pub that people actually read.”

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

BY ANDY YANEZ

THREE DISHES TO TRY

“I FEEL LIKEWE ARE THE COMMUNITY HUB. PEOPLE TRUST US. THEYKNOWUS.” RAYMOND GREEN, OWNER

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Raymond Green has owned Pomodoro’s NASA location for the last decade.

PHOTOS COURTESY RAYMOND GREEN

Pomodoro’s NASA 1303 E. NASA Parkway, Ste. 100, Houston 281-480-0700 tossed with mushrooms, spinach and homemade tomato cream meat sauce. 1 The Pizza Nick ($13) comes with pepperoni, bacon, bell peppers, onions, jalapenos and mozzarella cheese. 2 The chicken Parmesan ($16) is dipped in Parmesan breading, topped with marinara sauce and mozzarella cheese, and served over spaghetti. 3 La Nona ($14) features angel hair pasta

Pomodoro’s NASA Restaurant serves as a ‘community hub’ for local customers T he rst thing Raymond Green did when he became the owner of Pomodoro’s NASA

Throughout the years, various challenges have risen from storms to the coronavirus pandemic. The Pomodoro’s team, like many restau- rants across the city, had to make tough choices to keep its business functioning as best as could be under the circumstances. One of those dicult decisions came amid the pandemic, which forced Pomodoro’s to cut pay. General Manager Nick Roberts pulled the sta together and told his employees if they did not need the hours and were willing to volunteer to take the cuts, then to give them up so those with families or bigger nancial ties could take them. The sacrice was done to ensure all employees kept a job, which

Pomodoro’s was able to do. A big fac- tor in getting them to buy in, Green said, had to do with the culture at the business. “We are a big family here. ... The sta was very understanding, and they worked with each other,” Roberts said. Another thing Pomodoro’s prides itself on is being able to deliver fresh, quality meals to its customers as well as getting its products from locally sourced vendors. This was already challenging with the pandemic and made even harder with the February freeze, but Green felt Pomodoro’s had a responsibility to stay open. “People trust us. They know us,” he said. “That is the whole thing; we’re that community center.”

in 2011 was go to the only microwave in the kitchen of the restaurant and throw it in the dumpster. Green wanted everything at the Italian restaurant to be fresh, and he wanted all of the cooking to be done in the establishment’s ovens. After making deliveries for the owner, Green was ready to carry on the foundation built at Pomodoro’s while making it his own, and that included setting a certain standard. “We’re basically a family estab- lishment,” Green said. “We’re very relaxed, easy going. We’re just serving a good product at a decent price for our customers.”

www.pomodorosnasa.com Hours: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily

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BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

Renae Vania Tomczak President and CEO, Mental Health America of Greater Houston

faith community can also bring you comfort and a means of support. HOWCANEMPLOYERS SUP PORTTHEIREMPLOYEESAS COMPANIESRETURNTOWORK? We have reached the one-year anniversary of the declaration of a worldwide pandemic and seen the impact play out in terms of the mental health of our nation. Change is dicult, and just as it was dicult to transition fromwork to home, the transition back will likely require patience and an oering of grace. Providing support and under- standing is crucial—promote an open and supportive culture encouraging feedback from employees to help decrease work-related stress and enhance motivation. It’s important for leadership to share that seeking help for a mental health concern will not jeopardize their career and value to the organization. Other ideas include leaders mod- eling healthy behaviors like taking a walk at lunch and encouraging employees to use their vacation time to reduce burnout.

The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to an increase in mental health issues for residents of the Greater Houston area over the past year, according to Renae Vania Tomczak, president and CEO of Mental Health America of Greater Houston, a regional mental health education and advocacy organization. Community Impact Newspaper spoke with Vania Tomczak about the toll the year has taken on the region. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. BY DANICA LLOYD

HOWHAS THEPANDEMIC AFFECTEDTHEMENTALHEALTH OFHOUSTONIANS? We’re awaiting data for the early months of 2021, but throughout 2020 our local screening data has consis- tently demonstrated that people are struggling. We’ve seen signicant increases in depression and anxiety; alcohol and substance use; eating disorders; and youth at risk for emo- tional, attentional or behavioral di- culties. While this is troubling, what the screenings have also accomplished

than 30 minutes a day. Because the stress we feel impacts us both physically and mentally, taking care of our body is important. Spring has arrived, and it’s time to return to outdoor activities—walking and bike riding has a tremendous eect on our wellbeing. Connection is so very important as we are social beings. Create your own support network by making a list of friends and family who bring happi- ness to your life, and reach out when you’re feeling low. Engaging with your

is identifying a help-seeking popula- tion earlier than ever before, giving us new opportunities to address mental health concerns long before they become a Stage 4 crises. WHATARE SOME EXAM PLESOFHEALTHYCOPING MECHANISMS? Healthy ways to cope with stress include taking a break fromwatching, reading or listening to news stories. Early on in the pandemic I learned I need to limit my intake ... to no more

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BAY AREA EDITION • MAY 2021

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