Richardson - July 2020

RICHARDSON EDITION

REAL ESTATE

ONLINE AT

2020EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 11 | JULY 22 - AUG. 19, 2020

Local market activity on the rise following COVID - 19 shutdowns

Shutdown orders intended to slow the spread of the coronavirus had a minor e ff ect on home buying and selling in Richardson, according to Collin County Association of Realtors data, but activity quickly resumed once restrictions lifted. BOUNCINGBACK Homes under contract (pending sale) New Listings KEY

year for real estate, Jones said. Shut- down orders led to a near halt in view- ings in late March and early April, but as businesses began to reopen, a sense of urgency returned. “We had 30% more showings this May than last May,” she said. “Once people did start to come out, they came out in large numbers.” New listings in Richardson dropped by about 23% from March to April, but then increasedby about 59%fromApril to May, according to the association. Sellers are capitalizing on low housing stock, which drives up demand from buyers, said Angela McCants, a Realtor with Dave Perry Miller Real Estate. “We don’t have much inventory, and CONTINUED ON 15

BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

The Richardson home market is regaining momentum after a steep dropo ff in April, local real estate agents report. “Three months ago, when every- thing looked so dismal, we would have never expected what we are seeing now,” said Marilyn Jones, an Ebby Hal- liday Realtor working in the Richard- son o ffi ce. Data from the Collin County Associ- ation of Realtors show the city’s num- ber of new listings and pending sales were up in May, signaling a mindset shift among buyers and sellers whose con fi dence in the market may have fal- tered due to the virus, experts say. Spring is normally a busy time of

200 150 100 50 0

January

February

March

April

May

Month

May 1: Certain businesses are allowed to reopen at 25% capacity. March 23-24: Dallas and Collin counties issue stay-at-home orders.

Jan. 20: The fi rst U.S. coronavirus case is detected in Washington state.

March 10: Dallas County reports its fi rst two positive cases of the virus.

May 18: Second phase of reopening begins in Texas.

SOURCES: COLLIN COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE DATA / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Plano ISD bracing for an abnormal fall

In-classroom

100% remote

Plano ISD has narrowed down the options it is considering for the 2020-21 school year to two learning tracks for students. PATHS FOR LEARNING

days a week on campus, instruction with teacher, additional safety precautions

Overview:

days a week of remote instruction

BY DANIEL HOUSTON

Video instruction with teachers; some live interaction

Methods of instruction:

Face-to-face instruction with teacher and classmates

RISDprepares to release o ffi cial reopening plans As Plano ISD navigates a rapidly changing environment, the district is preparing to reopen schools but also to o ff er a fully remote option for families who are not yet comfortable with their kids returning to the classroom. But depending on how prevalent the CONTINUED ON 17

Curriculum:

In-classroom and remote curricula are the same.

If schools shut down again:

In-classroom instruction would become 100% remote.

SOURCE: PLANO ISD / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SPONSOREDBY • Marine Military Academy 2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

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REAL ESTATE INSIGHTS

11

CARDIOVASCULAR CARE IS

JUST A HEARTBEAT AWAY.

Your heart is at the center of everything you do, and at Methodist Richardson Medical Center, it’s at the center of everything we do. We o ff er a broad spectrum of heart care related to general cardiology, interventional and electrophysiology procedures, and surgery. From prevention and diagnosis to treatment, we’re here with comprehensive care to help you stay heart healthy. Trust. Methodist.

To find a cardiologist, call 877-637-4297 or visit MethodistHealthSystem.org/Heart.

Texas law prohibits hospitals from practicing medicine. The physicians on the Methodist Health System medical staff are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Methodist Richardson Medical Center, Methodist Health System, or any of its affiliated hospitals. Methodist Health System complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

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Look at What Our Customers are Saying:

Jerry Parks (left) meeting with his banker, Maureen McGuire, ”‡•‹†‡–ǡ‡šƒ•‡’—„Ž‹…‘”–‰ƒ‰‡ (right). “As CEO of Traditional Select Homes, a custom home builder, I’ve been with ‘big banks’, but this time I was looking for a bank that understood my business needs and could provide that ‘personal touch.’ I wanted a bank where the bankers greeted me with a handshake and actually knew me by name ! That’s why I chose ‡šƒ•‡’—„Ž‹…ƒǤ My banker is Maureen McGuire, and she has handled my banking needs for years. I can always count on her to make the loan process quick and easy. On one occasion, she approved and closed a home loan in f ive days to a buyer of one of my houses. Maureen is committed to providing outstanding customer service. She understands my business needs and what my buyers want. I am ‘sold’ on ‡šƒ•‡’—„Ž‹…ƒ ƒ† ’Žƒ‘…‘–‹—‹‰› ”‡Žƒ–‹‘•Š‹’™‹–Š–Š‡ˆ‘”ƒ››‡ƒ”•–‘…‘‡Ǥ̶ –  Jerry Parks, CEO of Traditional Select Homes (Jerry is author of The Builder Book) www.texasrepublicbank.com 690 W. Campbell R ‘ƒ†ǡ Richardson, TX 75080   Next to UTD • 972-685-2040 W.  Campbell UTD RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020 3

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

6

Now Open, Coming Soon &more TO - DO LIST Local events and things to do CITY& COUNTY News from the city of Richardson

FROMLEANNE: Nothing about this summer feels “normal” except for the heat. Due to business closures earlier this year, the typical busy spring real estate market was pushed into the summer. Vacations and activities were altered dramatically, and the fi rst day of school is quickly approaching. Families in Richardson and Plano ISDs are making tough decisions about what is best for their children. In this issue, we’re tracking local real estate trends and aiming to inform our readers about what they need to know heading into next school year. Leanne Libby, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Leanne Libby, llibby@communityimpact.com ASSOCIATE MANAGING EDITOR Olivia Lueckemeyer REPORTER Makenzie Plusnick GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tracy Ruckel

8

10

Real EstateEdition

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in P fl ugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

FROMOLIVIA: You may notice that we have brought back our print To-Do List (see Page 8) after a three-month hiatus. Businesses in Richardson and beyond are o ff ering virtual events to keep the community entertained at home. Some are also o ff ering in-person events in socially distanced settings. We wanted to highlight these options for residents so they can fi nd a moment of reprieve during these uncertain times. Olivia Lueckemeyer, EDITOR

BUSINESS FEATURE

11

KB Studios

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 11

New businesses 10

Community events 8

New home listings 158

Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

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Hot summer months mean higher water use. Let’s help keep Texas water flowing through every tap by following these water-saving sprinkler tips: • Water your lawn only when needed • Run shorter cycles to prevent run-off • Check the sprinkler system once a month Learn more at WaterIsAwesome.com and NTMWD.com/SaveWater .

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RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened, are coming soon or closing

6

PLANO PKWY.

PGBT TOLL

2

11

RENNER RD.

SHIRE BLVD.

BRECKINRIDGE BLVD.

13

RICHARDSON

TELECOM PKWY.

CAMPBELL RD.

4

6

Sakhuu Thai Cuisine

7

COLLINS BLVD.

COURTESY SAKHUU THAI CUISINE

5

ARAPAHO RD.

7

9

15

BRICK ROW

8

10

MAIN ST.

3

BELT LINE RD.

75

14

1

78

SPRING VALLEY RD.

BUCKINGHAM RD.

Tipsy's Woodworking

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

COURTESY TIPSY'S WOODWORKING

5 Richardson Orthodontics opened June 1 at 702 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 102, Richardson. The practice o ff ers a variety of services and treatments, including braces and Invisalign, for children and adults. 972-295-9266. www.richardsonortho.com 6 Sakhuu Thai Cuisine opened July 9 in the Eastside development at 1811 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 400, Richardson. The restaurant, which also has a location in Dallas, serves a variety of dishes, such as sakhuu stu ff ed wings, Bangkok lo mein noodles and panang curry. 469-730-2025. www.sakhuuthai.com 7 Tipsy’sWoodworking opened a 24,000-square-foot wood shop July 3 at 1601 N. Glenville Drive, Richardson. A crew of woodworkers and expert craftsmen cre- ate furniture, home decor, gifts and other handcrafted items. 469-708-6219. www.tipsyswoodworking.com

3 Richardson Family Eyecare & Eye- wear opened in mid-May at 159 N. Plano Road, Richardson. The business o ff ers routine eye exams as well as a wide array of frames. Customers who come in for an eye exam will receive their choice of a $50 discount on frames or a $50 gift card. Frames and lenses are currently dis- counted by up to 30%. 469-567-3640. www.richardsonfamilyeyecare.com 4 Richardson Family YMCA reopened June 15. A phased reopening approach, which began June 1, allowed the orga- nization to prepare facilities and to train sta ff on new safety protocols, according to a June 8 press release. The Richard- son branch, located at 821 Custer Road, Richardson, will operate at 50% capacity for the time being. Day camps, summer camps and youth sports have begun a phased relaunch, according to the release. 972-231-3424. www.ymcadallas.org/locations/richardson

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER & MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

8 Tofu Factory Dallas opened in the DFW Chinatown development June 1. The restaurant, located at 400 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 11, Richardson, serves a variety of Korean Cuisine, including soft tofu and pork soup, kimchi fried rice and seafood pancakes. 972-231-3888. www.tofufactorydallas.com 9 TrouVi Cookies is open for delivery and curbside pickup at 580 W. Arapaho Road, Ste. 163, Richardson. The business, which opened in early April, specializes in cookies made from scratch and baked in a dedicated gluten-free kitchen. The business plans to begin building out its storefront within the next few weeks, a spokesperson for the company said in late June. TrouVi cookies are never made with corn syrup, hydrogenated oils, arti fi cial colors, fl avors, sweeteners or preservatives. 214-552-8814. www.trouvicookies.com

NOWOPEN 1 Bollywood Spice opened in mid- June at 310 E. Main St., Richardson. The restaurant and hookah bar serves a vari- ety of Indian food, such as chicken tikka masala and tandoori roti. 972-850-9412 2 Tri Tip Grill opened June 22 in the CityLine development at 1417 Ren- ner Road, Ste. 300, Richardson. The restaurant was initially supposed to open in March but was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. The menu features sandwiches, barbecue platters, burgers and salads. The restaurant, which is open daily from 10:30 a.m.-11 p.m. and o ff ers a weekday happy hour from 2-6 p.m., also has a location at The Star in Frisco. 972-987-8241. www.tritipgrill.com

       

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6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Shell Shock CBD is owned and operated by veterans. (Courtesy Shell Shock CBD)

Law Office of Dana D. Huffman BERKNER HIGH • STEPHEN F. AUSTIN TEXAS WESELYAN LAW • 25 YEARS IN PRACTICE • WILLS • ESTATE PLANNING PROBATE • MEDIATION CIVIL/FAMILY/CPS • ARBITRATION TAKE CARE OF THE ONES YOU LOVE WITH SOLID ESTATE PLANNING. NOW OFFERING REDUCED RATE WILLS FOR MILITARY

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Shell Shock CBD opened July 3 at 1601 N. Glenville Drive, Ste. 108, Richardson. The business sells gummies, drops, soaps and roll-ons made with cannabidiol. It also sells some products with a low, legal amount of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive chemical found in marijuana. The company was founded by veterans with a mission of making CBD products a ff ordable and accessible to former service members. 469-708-6219. www.shellshockcbd.com

CAMPBELL RD.

75

1143 Rockingham, Suite 107, Richardson, TX

COLLINS BLVD.

(ACTIVE, RETIRED OR FORMER)

N

972-713-7757 • WWW.HUFFMAN.LAW

8

12

Tofu Factory Dallas

SweetStop

MAKENZIE PLUSNICK / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY SWEET STOP

COMING SOON 10 FastSigns expects to open July 27 at 743 Brick Row, Ste. 300, Richardson. The business creates custom signs and graph- ics printed on a variety of products, such as decals, stickers and vehicle wraps. www.fastsigns.com 11 Rooster Town Cafe should open by Labor Day at 3613 Shire Blvd., Ste. 180, Richardson. The restaurant will serve breakfast and lunch seven days a week. Rooster Town is the latest culinary proj- ect by restaurateur Dale Wamstad, who owns the adjacent Texas chophouse and Two for the Money BBQ. 12 SweetStop expects to open by the end of July at 201 S. Greenville Ave., Ste. 10, Richardson, according to the owner. The bakery will have custom cakes, pastries and fresh bread and will o ff er catering. 214-709-2311. www.sweetstopdallas.com

CLOSINGS 13 Hipster Baby closed its store at 2701 Custer Parkway, Ste. 714, Richardson, in late June. The store, which carries an eclectic variety of infant and toddler clothing and accessories, has transitioned to online-only operations, according to owner Mary Bowen. 469-444-0813. www.hipsterbaby.com 14 Rallye Auto Service closed its downtown location at 103 W. Main St., Richardson, on May 1. The family-owned auto repair shop o ff ers factory scheduled maintenance and repairs on domestic, Asian and European vehicles. Rallye has another location on Hillcrest Road in Dallas. 972-996-7308. www.richardsonautorepairs.com 15 Tapioca House will close in August because the owner is retiring. The busi- ness, located at 400 N. Greenville Ave., Ste. 23, Richardson, serves boba and milk teas. 972-437-3065

7

RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

for bus i ness ! Open Limited hours. Cal l for detai ls. Dine in, to-go, and curbside pick up avai lable.

TO - DO LIST

July-August events

AUGUST RECURRING EVENT

CARBARET BRIZO

Enjoy live music, classic movies and performing artists from the safety of your car at this event hosted by Brizo every Saturday night. $20 per car. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Brizo, 300 N. Coit Road, Richardson. 469-571-7350. www.facebook.com/driveintx (Courtesy Reid Robinson)

Editor's note: These events were still on as of press time July 15, but may change due to coronovirus concerns. Check the website or call before attending.

campaign aimed at heightening crime prevention awareness and generating support for local anti-crime programs, among other items. Free. 6:30-8 p.m. 972-744-49555. www.richardsonpolice. net/services/community-engagement/ national-night-out

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK JULY 29 WE’RE NOT ALL IN THIS LOOKAT THE CORONAVIRUS The University of Texas at Dallas presents a look into the coronavirus pandemic through the lens of social sciences. Dr. John Malek-Ahmadi, assistant professor of instruction of sociology at the university, will examine the spread of the virus and con fi rmation bias. Free. 2-3 p.m. 972-883-2935. https://utd.link/pandemic 30 BURN BOOT CAMP: POP - UP CAMP TOGETHER: A SOCIOLOGICAL Burn Boot Camp holds a free workout in the Plaza at CityLine. Only 23 people are allowed per class to ensure social distancing. 6-6:45 p.m. Free. 1150 State St., Richardson. 214-396-6570. Details on how to sign up can be found at www.facebook.com/ burnbootcamprichardsontx. AUGUST 01 PAINT & SIP During this virtual event hosted by Christ Community church in Richardson, participants can follow along with an instructor to create their own masterpiece. Guests can choose between 40 di ff erent design options. Materials will be available via no-contact pickup. $18. 7-9 p.m. 972-991-0200. Search “Christ Community virtual paint and sip” on www.eventbrite.com to register. 04 ANNUAL NATIONAL NIGHT OUT PLANNING EVENT Watch a virtual presentation on planning for National Night Out, which takes place in October. National Night Out is a yearlong community-building

3600 Sh i re Bl vd. | (972) 881-7570

RECURRING EVENTS ‘THEATRE OF THE IMAGINATION’ Richardson Theatre Centre is posting a series of online shows to keep fans entertained. Each show includes a musical selection followed by a 10- to 20-minute mini-production, which ranges from classic radio shows to original dramas. Free. 972-699-1130. www.richardsontheatrecentre.net STORYTIME STARS Join the Richardson Public Library for a virtual story event for preschool- age children. A sta ff member will read a di ff erent story each Wednesday via the library’s Facebook page. Free.

10:30-11 a.m. 972-744-4350. www.cor.net/departments/ public-library FREE LIVE ONLINE ART CLASS Enjoy a free watercolor

demonstration, suitable for all ages and skill levels. Modi fi cations will be shown for colored pencils, markers and crayons. Plano Arts & Events will host a new class every Monday. Free. Noon-12:45 p.m. 972-941-5600. www.plano.gov/arts

Find more or submit Richardson events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Council OKs funding for Greenville project Richardson City Council voted

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

ONGOING PROJECT

CAMPBELL RD.

75

June 22 to partially fund pedestrian and cycling improvements on and near Greenville Avenue. The $2 million project needs buy-in from the Regional Transpor- tation Council, a subcommittee of the North Central Texas Council of Governments, before it can proceed. Proposed improvements would make the Greenville Avenue and Arapaho Road intersection safer for users of the Central Trail and the bike lane, according to the project’s funding application. The project would also extend the Central Trail from the northbound US 75 frontage road to Greenville via Arapaho and would add streetlights along certain areas. Most of the project would be funded through a federally backed grant program. Local agencies must kick in 20% of the necessary funds, according to the application. Richardson would

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT RICNEWS @ COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Funding sources: city of Richardson, Texas Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration Campbell Road auxiliary lane project Work continues on a project to widen Campbell Road. Construction of the waterline and storm drain inlets are ongoing and will be completed by July. Extension of the right-turn lane on the southbound US 75 frontage road will be fi nished around that time as well. Once complete, the project area will include a westbound auxiliary lane on Campbell, an extended left- turn lane to allow westbound tra ffi c to access Alamo Road from Campbell and an improved signal at Campbell and Collins Boulevard. Timeline: May-December Cost: $2 million

The project will make the Greenville Avenue-Arapaho Road intersection safer for users of the Central Trail and the bike lane. (Courtesy city of Richardson)

use credits accrued from capital investments into toll facilities to cover its $340,000 share. The Regional Transportation Council will approve grant requests in September. Construction would begin in the fi nal quarter of 2022 and take about a year to complete.

75

ARAPAHO RD.

MAIN ST.

N

keepitintheneighborhood officespaceforlease

+ + + + +

Exterior paint and new landscaping

2201 N Central Expy Richardson, TX 75080 For leasing info, call: 214.438.6348

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9

RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Richardson, Richardson ISD & Dallas County

CITY HIGHLIGHTS RICHARDSON ISD A full rebuild of Lake Highlands Junior High School could be included in a potential May 2021 bond, according to the district. The recommendation was made after a facility audit determined that the 64-year-old school would require $153 million worth of upgrades before 2030. DALLAS COUNTY Commissioners voted July 10 to pitch $500,000 toward a two-year study on the prevalence of COVID-19 in Dallas-Fort Worth. All in, the study will cost $10 million. Richardson City Council Meets July 27 and 28 and Aug. 3, 10 and 17 at 6 p.m. Council has encouraged citizens to watch meetings online at www.cor.net. Richardson ISD Meets Aug. 10 at 6 p.m. The board has been holding meetings via video conference, which can be viewed at www.risd.org. Plano ISD Meets Aug. 4 and 18 at 7 p.m. The board has been holding meetings via video conference, which can be viewed at www.pisd.edu/pisdlive. MEETINGSWE COVER

Deadly force policy explained amid Floyd killing

BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

RICHARDSON Following nation- wide calls for police reform, City Council was briefed June 22 on the Richardson Police Department’s use- of-force policy. “So much is going on in our country, and it is one of the most challenging times I can remember in my career,” Chief Jimmy Spivey said. O ffi cers in Richardson are banned from using chokeholds unless the o ffi cer is in a fi ght for his or her life, Spivey said. All other alternatives, including verbal de-escalation and giving a warning that the o ffi cer is planning to shoot, should be exhausted if possible. If an o ffi cer witnesses a colleague using excessive force, they are expected to intervene, Spivey added. Criminal and internal a ff airs inves- tigations are conducted in the event

O ffi cers in Richardson are trained in de-escalation strategies. (Courtesy Mike Wieczorek)

40 hours of continuing education each year. The statewide standard is 40 hours every two years, Spivey said. Spivey condemned the force used on George Floyd, who died May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, while in police custody. “There is no way, shape, form or fashion that this is anything that professional law enforcement or any community in the United States should tolerate,” Spivey said. Information on the use-of-force and racial pro fi ling policies was added the department’s website to increase transparency, Spivey said.

that deadly force is used, Spivey said. The department does not require o ffi cers to have a college degree; however, candidates must take an exam and be interviewed by the board prior to hiring. They are also subject to extensive background investigations. Once hired, o ffi cers go through 918 hours of training, which includes courses in professional policing, racial pro fi ling and de-escalation strategies. The Texas Commission on Law Enforcement requires 696 hours of training, according to Spivey. RPD o ffi cers must also complete

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

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2020 REAL ESTATE EDITION

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

2019 - 20 RICHARDSON REAL ESTATE MARKET AT A GLANCE

DAYS ON THEMARKET AVERAGE June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

DNT

75082

75080

75080

75081

39

42

35

41

Home prices in Richardson have remained mostly steady over the past two years, save for nominal dips across all ZIP codes. Homes are sitting on the market for longer, but not by much. The northeastern panhandle, which is encompassed by the 75082 ZIP code, was the only area of the city that saw an increase in the number of homes sold.

+7.69%

+17.14%

75

75082

75081

43

46

+6.98%

Dallas County

Collin County

HOMES SOLD NUMBER OF

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

39

45 +15.38%

56

59 +5.36%

563

386

HOME SALES PRICE AVERAGE

557 -1.07%

374 -3.11%

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

240

261 +8.75%

$317,500 -0.79% $315,000

$285,000

-0.18%

$284,500

24,624

$370,000

23,932 -2.81%

Dallas County

-2.43%

$361,000

16,318

Collin County

16,354 +0.22%

Dallas County

Collin County

$241,000 $250,000 +3.73%

$335,000 $340,000 +1.49%

TOTAL HOMES SOLD IN RICHARDSON

June 2018-May 2019

June 2019-May 2020

20.19%

21.91%

47.35%

46.73%

Texas Richardson

Texas

$315,000 $310,000 -1.59%

$245,000 $249,000 +1.63%

1,189

1,192

homes sold

homes sold

32.46%

31.36%

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11

RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

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12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

BUSINESS FEATURE

KB Studios Richardson showroom specializes in timely, hassle-free kitchen and bathroom remodels

W hen KB Studios opened its doors in late 2018, the goal was to provide home- owners an easy way to upgrade their space without the hassle of a big-box store. “We want to o ff er the client an alternative based on simplicity,” General Manager Clarissa Rivera said. The Richardson showroom features predesigned kitchen and bathroom vignettes that help shoppers cir- cumvent the stress of choosing from hundreds of options, Rivera said. “The minute you with the same consultant from the moment they enter the showroom through the end of the project. “It’s a personal relationship that other folks don’t o ff er,” Rivera said. “Personalization is really the biggest value we have.” KB Studios takes care of the entire process, from tearing out cabinets and countertops to the fi nished product, and they do so in a timely manner, she added. “I am personally committed to that, so there is not three or four or fi ve days in between [construction],” Rivera said. step [into the show- room], you actually feel a sense of tranquil- ity,” she said. “[You are not] overwhelmed by too many materials.” Clients work BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK

The studio works with at least one new interior designer per year to ensure it is up on the latest trends, Rivera said. KB Studios is in the process of fabricating its own line of cabinets as well. Richardson was the ideal location for the studio, Rivera said. Market research showed that many homes in the city are aging and require renovations to improve their value. But the business also caters to cus- tomers looking to update for aesthetic reasons, she added. “We have everything for every market,” she said. Like most busi- consultations are available. Clients and consultants alike are required to wear masks and maintain social distancing during in-person visits. “Ideally, the best thing is to come and visit so they [can] experience the studio, the store and the designers [and get] that personal touch,” Rivera said. For Rivera, working for KB Studios is about more than helping clients achieve their dream renovations. “I enjoy that I actually develop a relationship [with clients] and that they allow me to go to their homes,” Rivera said. “I made a client for life.” nesses, KB Studios was forced to adjust to coronavirus-related shutdowns. To help keep clients safe and comfortable, virtual

KB Studios prides itself on making the renovation process easier by o ff ering predesigned options. (Photos by Makenzie Plusnick/Community Impact Newspaper) THE JOURNEY TOANEWSPACE

KB Studios streamlines the renovation process so clients can upgrade their space in a short amount of time. Here are four steps to a renovated kitchen or bathroom, according to the business.

“WEWANT TO OFFER THE CLIENT ANALTERNATIVE BASEDON SIMPLICITY.” CLARISSA RIVERA, GENERAL MANAGER

Meet with a consultant to plan your dream space. Step 1: Consultation

Rivera (center) works with consultants Je ff rey Moreno and Melanie Bordin.

#1

Work with your consultant to create the ideal design for your home. Step 2: Design

#2

Clients choose materials for countertops, cabinets, backsplashes and more.

KB Studios hires a contractor to do the Step 3: Tear-outs and construction

KB Studios 1373 W. Campbell Road, Richardson 972-677-9707 www.kbstudios.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., closed Sat.-Sun.

#3

necessary construction, such as tearing out old countertops or installing cabinets and backsplashes.

CAMPBELL RD.

Step4: Enjoy the fi nished

product. #4

N

13

RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

REAL ESTATE

Snapshot of the market

COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

MARKET DATA FORMAY 2020

HOMES SOLD / AVERAGE DAYS ON THEMARKET 75080

HOMES ON THE MARKET BY CITY 2019

121 TOLL

75081

75082

2020

PLANO

$900,000+

1/0

-

-

DNT TOLL

MURPHY

Plano 869 566 Richardson 275 224

$800,000-$899,000

-

-

1/0

75

$700,000-$799,999

1/157

-

5/42

$600,000-$699,999

11/41

5/56

6/27

RICHARDSON

PGBT TOLL

$500,000-$599,999

6/14

12/40

-

63 40 411 346

Murphy

$400,000-$499,999

4/9

12/51

3/64

78

$300,000-$399,999

4/37

5/23

-

Garland

GARLAND

$200,000-$299,999

41/36

2/36

-

$199,999 or less

1/0

1/0

-

30

N

MEDIAN PRICE OF HOMES SOLD WITHYEAR - OVER - YEARPERCENTAGE CHANGE

NUMBER OF HOMES UNDER CONTRACT 2019 2020

NUMBER OF NEW LISTINGS 2019 2020

2019

2020

75080

75081

75082

$600,000

87 76 50 39 46 43

56 47 34 25 28 23

$550,000

75080

75080

$500,000

+13.8%

75081

75081

$450,000

$400,000

- 1.6%

75082

75082

$350,000

0%

$300,000

$250,000

$0

RICHARDSONMARKET DATA

PERCENT OF ASKING PRICE RECEIVED

Average days on the market 32 Percent of original price received 98.5% New listings 158

Homes on the market 224 Median sales price $311,500 Homes under contract 95

2019

2020

WITHYEAR - OVER - YEARCHANGE

75080

75081

75082

+1.3

100%

+1.7

- 1.3

99%

98%

97%

96%

95%

0%

MARKET DATA PROVIDED BY COLLIN COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, COURTESY OF NORTH TEXAS REAL ESTATE INFORMATION SYSTEMS, NTREIS TRENDS © 2020 SHOWINGTIME / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

We Know Insurance. 1Cnj̾GOEUFC0GAF?ǍBTPOǍC?TGOAC` Q Commercial Insurance Q Homeowner and Renters Insurance Q Auto Insurance Q Life Insurance

Call today for a quote: 972-889-1833 www.weknowinsurance.com 2100 Lakeside Blvd Ste 170 • Richardson

Sandy Garza Owner, Agent

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

CONTINUED FROM 1

[Richardson] is a popular place to live,” she said. “So it’s a really good time for someone to put their house on the market.” There were about 200 homes, or two months worth of inventory, on the Richardson market in March and April, according to the Texas A&M University Real Estate Center. Homes at a speci fi c price point between $200,000 and $350,000 are highly coveted in Richardson and tend to fl y o ff the market, said Carie Dall- mann with JP & Associates. “That’s the price point that gets you the best house for your money,” she said. Thenumber of homesunder contract followed a similar pattern, according to the association’s data. From March to April, the number of pending home sales fell by about 18%. The following month, it increased by 46%. The uptick in purchases could be explained by buyers looking to take advantage of record-low interest rates, Jones said. “People that have been hesitant before to stick their feet in the pond are ready to at least investigate the possi- bility,” she said. Favorable rates are also giving younger buyers the con fi dence to take the plunge, said Luke Hamlett, a loan o ffi cer with Supreme Lending. This has also had an e ff ect on the price of homes sold, he added. “I am seeing a lot of the younger crowd,” he said. “The new homebuy- ers—they’re not buying these big man- sions. They’re buying a starter home.” In Richardson, the average price of homes sold in February was $292,279. The number peaked in April, when homes sold for $346,854 on average, according to Texas A&M. Spending more time at home is also

causing some buyers to rethink their spaces, said Dallmann, who expects to see record sales in July. “People are downsizing because they’ve got too much house or they’re upsizing because they don’t have enough room to get away from their kids,” she said. Last October’s tornado had a greater e ff ect on Richardson’s housing market than the coronavirus, McCants said. Homes inhard-hit neighborhoodswere pulled o ff the market either because of damage or because sellers believed the area had lost some of its appeal. “Our neighborhoods looked like a war zone,” McCants said. “And who wants to move into that?” There were 301 Richardson homes on the market in October, according to Texas A&M. That number dropped to 244 and again to 198 in November and December, respectively. The aver- age prices of homes also decreased by about 9% to $304,110 in November, the data shows. The market is still recovering from the storm, McCants said. “There are still homes today that are not fi xed that aremaking the neighbor- hood look not as desirable as it once did,” she said. “Our trees were a huge factor in desirability, andmany of them were blown away.” Despite market disruptions, homes in Richardson remain in high demand due to the city’s quality schools, jobs and industries, McCants said. “When you look at the total picture of what you’re getting—in terms of edu- cation, the city services, the feeling of being safe—there is a more desirable draw,” she said.

HOMEBUYER’S GUIDE FIRST - TIME The process of buying a home can be stressful. Here is what to expect in fi ve simple steps. DESIGNED BY CHELSEA PETERS COMPILED BY OLIVIA LUECKEMEYER

NAIL DOWN YOUR BUDGET Knowing what you can a ff ord is a crucial fi rst step. Online mortgage calculators can estimate monthly payments. FUN FACT:

#1 STEP

80% 20%

Median down payment is

of fi rst-time homebuyers in the U.S. put down less than

6%

FUN FACT: The average interest rate on a fi xed 30 - YEAR 3.03% mortgage was

SECURE YOUR HOME LOAN

#2 STEP

Work with a lender to discuss loan options, current interest rates and how much you can borrow.

as of July 9.

FIND YOUR DREAM HOME Using apps like Zillow, buyers can narrow a search to fi nd homes that fi t their budget. A real estate agent can assist them with making the best o ff er.

#3 STEP

APPLY FOR A MORTGAGE Buyers typically have 45-60 days to secure their mortgage, which requires veri fi cation of income and assets.

#4 STEP

FUN FACT: The average debt-to-income ratio, or the percent of income used to pay debt, allowed by lenders is 36%. COAST INTO CLOSING

FUN FACT: The average closing cost is between 3% - 5% of the loan amount.

#5 STEP

A closing disclosure will list the fees owed. Closing costs include appraisal fees, title and homeowners insurance, property taxes and more.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

SOURCES: BANK OF AMERICA, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF ST. LOUIS, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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972.669.7807

15

RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

SURVEY RESULTS The majority of parents surveyed by Richardson ISD about their preference for the fall said they would like to see their children back in school.

“HAVING IN - PERSON SCHOOL IS CRITICAL, AND IT IS IMPERATIVE THATWE DO SO INAWAY THAT MITIGATES THE VIRUS. FORUS TOHAVE SCHOOL INPERSON INRICHARDSON ISD, WE WILL HAVE RELENTLESS FOCUS ON SAFETY.” SUPERINTENDENT JEANNIE STONE

36% opted for virtual school

17,799 respondents

64% opted for in-school learning

EDUCATION

SOURCE: RICHARDSON ISD / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Superintendent Jeannie Stone announced plans for the fall during a July 7 video message. (Screenshot courtesy YouTube)

Students in Richardson ISD can attend school online or in person this fall Richardson ISD released plans for in-person and online learning for the BY MAKENZIE PLUSNICK in Richardson ISD will look nothing—I mean, nothing—like the at-home Additionally, advanced placement and pre-AP courses will be available. Students in pre-K through sec-

in Richardson ISD, we will have a relentless focus on safety,” she said. RISD had initially considered o ff er- ing a hybrid mode that would have combined in-person and online learn- ing, but the district decided against that option after analyzing state guidelines against necessary training and sta ffi ng, Executive Director of Communications Tim Clark said. Masks and daily health screenings will be required for on-campus students. Staggered arrivals, one- way hallways, lunch in classrooms and other precautions are still being considered. Online learning will look com- pletely di ff erent than it did in the spring, Stone said. “The fi rst thing you need to under- stand is that the virtual learning we will o ff er our students this fall 2020

learning from last spring,” Stone said. Virtual education will include syn- chronous instruction as well as work that is done on an individual basis, also known as asynchronous learning, Stone said. Synchronous instruction, which will be used for grades 3-12, requires teachers and students to participate in online classes and timed online assessments. Students will also have assigned times to conference with teachers via video. Elementary students in grades 3-6 will have scheduled online classes with teachers every day as well as time for independent work, Stone said. Students in grades 7-12 will have a full day of online classes, Stone said.

upcoming school year on July 7. The district sent out a survey to parents in June about their prefer- ences for the fall. Of the nearly 17,800 families who responded, approxi- mately 64% said they intend to send their students to school in-person, while 36% have chosen to remain online. This means 26,000 students will return to campuses and more than 12,000 will stay at home during the upcoming school year, Superinten- dent Jeannie Stone said in a July 7 video message. Recently released guidelines from the Texas Education Agency align with RISD’s plans, Stone said. “For us to have school in-person

ond grade will have asynchronous instruction, meaning students will not take scheduled online classes. A teacher will check in every day to provide instruction, take attendance and answer questions. Teachers will also be available throughout the day, Stone said. Students will remain at their zoned campuses for online and in-person instruction, Stone said. As of press time July 15, RISD was expected to release its formal plans for the upcoming school year the week of July 20.

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WHAT IF A STUDENT GETS SICKAT SCHOOL? Plano ISD has outlined a set of draft protocols for how to handle possible cases of coronavirus in sta ff and students. Here is what the process would look like for a child who fi rst experiences symptoms at school. STUDENT FEELS SYMPTOMS Possible COVID-19 symptoms include fever of 100 degrees or higher, cough, shortness of breath, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat or loss of taste or smell.

MASKS IN SCHOOLS

Under Plano ISD’s draft plan for health and safety, students and sta ff would be required to wear face coverings in at least some situations while at school. WHAT FACE COVERINGS WOULD BE ALLOWED?

NURSE CALLS STUDENT’S PARENTS Parents would be required to pick up their child from school within an hour of being noti fi ed, under the draft policy.

Cloth face coverings that cover the nose and mouth

Disposable face masks

Face shields

STUDENT’S CLASSROOM IS EMPTIED, DISINFECTED Classmates would have to leave the classroom while it is cleaned. They may set up in another learning space, go on a walk, or engage in another activity.

WHO HAS TOWEAR THEM?

OTHER STUDENTS ARE INFORMED OF CONTACT Schools would inform classmates who may have come into contact with the student if he or she has tested positive for COVID-19. EXPOSED STUDENTS ENTER ISOLATION PROTOCOL Students will not be allowed to come to school if they have been sick in the past two weeks; are awaiting a COVID-19 test result or live with someone who is waiting on a test result; have come into contact with a con fi rmed positive case; or have traveled internationally or on a cruise in the last 14 days.

Teachers and sta ff

All students

WHERE WILL MASKS BE REQUIRED? • Pre-K-Grade 2—hallways, common areas, during arrival or dismissal • Grades 3-12—all times, with some exceptions

WHEN CAN THE STUDENT RETURN TO CLASS? If the student tests positive for COVID-19, he or she may return to school when these three conditions are met: 1. Fever-free for 72 hours without fever-reducing medication 2. Symptoms improve 3. Ten days pass since symptoms began

WHAT ARE THE EXCEPTIONS? While eating, if distanced from others

During some athletic or extracurricular activities

SOURCE: PLANO ISD / COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

this remote learning this year will not be at all like the one experienced in the spring.” Tarrah Lantz, a district parent who recently became president of the Plano ISD Council of PTAs, said remote learning this past spring mostly worked well for her family. It was also challenging, she said, and it required more of her time to help her kids with assignments. For parents she knowswith full-time jobs, the additional time requirement was even more disruptive, Lantz said. “At-home learning during the spring became something that they did in the evenings,” Lantz said of working par- ents she knows. “So these are going to be the same parents that are going to choose to send their children to school in the fall. They have no other option.” Plano ISD is also expected to require teachers, sta ff and studentswho return to campus in the fall to wear masks in most situations, the district con fi rmed in a draft version of a new health and

safety policy that was shared with par- ents July 9. Under the draft policy, students grades 3-12 would have to wear face coverings while at school, with some exceptions. Younger students, from pre-K through second grade, would be required to wear masks in hallways and other common areas, including during arrival and dismissal from school. In addition to the mask rules, under the new policy, the district would also require daily screenings for students and sta ff to determine if they display symptoms of COVID-19. Parents would be expected to take their children’s temperature each day as part of this process. The district’s remote learning options will be more robust than what was o ff ered in the spring, Hasley said. Under the current plan, teachers would design video instruction plans and interact with remote students using the same curriculum that is

used in the main classrooms, Hasley told trustees. There would also be live instruction sessions each day in which remote students would partici- pate with a teacher and other remote students. Another option, which had been all but ruled out by late June, would have allowed for a hybrid approach—one where some students would be able to attend class in person but spend part of the time in remote learning. As district o ffi cials explored this option, it became clear they did not have enough sta ff to pull it o ff , Bonser said. The uncertainty regarding what school will look like in the fall can be a burden for parents, Lantz said. “Most of us are planners, and we want to know exactly how to plan out our fall,” Lantz said. “And it’s not easy right now.”

CONTINUED FROM 1

coronavirus becomes throughout the school year, that choice could end up being made for parents in the end. As of this paper’s print deadline, Plano ISD o ffi cials were preparing for the chance that rising infection totals could cause schools to shutter again altogether. This would require the district to move once again to 100% remote learning for all students, Superintendent Sara Bonser told trust- ees June 23. Although remote learning is expected to be more engaging for students in the fall than it was in the spring, district o ffi cials and some par- ents have expressed concerns that many students could fall through the cracks. “We have to be prepared to switch all learning to a fully remote system,” Assistant Superintendent for Aca- demic Services Katrina Hasley said at the June 23 trustees meeting. “Again,

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

17

RICHARDSON EDITION • JULY 2020

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