McKinney June 2021

MCKINNEY EDITION

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 3 ! JUNE 21 " JULY 18, 2021

SCHOOL YEAR STATS Since the 2016-17 school year, McKinney ISD had a total of 361 certi ! cations issued in its health care career and technical education program. Data for the 2019-20 school year was not recorded due to COVID-19.

159 certi ! ed nurse aide 89 CPR/basic life support for healthcare provider

67 medical certi ! ed coding associate

IMPACTS

6

23 certi ! ed personal trainer 8 certi ! ed EKG

HEALTHCARE EDITION 2021

SOURCE: MCKINNEY ISD " COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

7 certi ! ed patient care

3 emergency medical 4 phlebotomy technician 1 sterile processing & distribution

McKinney North High School CTE department chair Aly Deal (left) shows student Katie Gimlin how to apply kinesiology tape on fellow student EthanWeslowki. (Miranda Jaimes/Community Impact Newspaper)

SPONSORED BY • Baylor Scott &White Health • Dr. Jennifer Buchanan Orthodontics

McKinney ISDprovides student learning in health care " elds Riley Glover graduated this spring from McKinney North High School as a certi " ed personal trainer with a certi " cation in Introduction to Physi- cal Therapy. The COVID-19 pandemic helped open her eyes to the needs in the " eld, she said, and with her new certi " cations, she plans to go to medical school after graduating from college. “[The pandemic] proved just how important the health care system is, so being a part of something that’s important and makes such an impact on all of our communities is inspiring,” Glover said. This past school year, McKinney ISD’s Career & Technical Education Program has allowed students to study for 12 di # erent certi " cations in health care, per the district website, despite setbacks from the pandemic. CONTINUED ON 22 BY MIRANDA JAIMES &WILLIAM C. WADSACK

SNAPSHOT

15

One of the last remaining portions of Craig Ranch is being transformed as part of a new $250 million mixed-use project. Construction began in May for the District 121 development—located on about 18 acres at the northeast corner of SH121 andAlmaRoad—anchored by the new Kaizen Development eight-story o ! ce tower. Plans call for 40,000 square feet of retail and patio CONTINUED ON 28 District 121 to o ! ermore entertainment space BY MIRANDA JAIMES

BLUEBIRD COTTAGE EVENT CENTER

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DISTRICT 121

SRT TOLL

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Plans have been unveiled for District 121, a newmixed-use development at Craig Ranch. (Rendering courtesy city of McKinney)

JC’S BURGER HOUSE

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MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the ! rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and P " ugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMVICKI: There is no shortage of new businesses planting their " ags in our fast-growing city of McKinney. In the monthly Impacts section (see Pages 6-7), readers can ! nd out what’s coming soon and now open around town. If you see dirt turning or know about a new business in the works, my team and I always welcome questions and news tips at mcknews@communityimpact.com. Vicki Chen, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity. Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

FROMMIRANDA: This month I enjoyed getting to visit with McKinney ISD students who have an interest in going into the health care industry. These students have doubled down on their commitment to helping others’ health after seeing the e # ects of the coronavirus pandemic. It’s an inspiration to hear their stories, and the opportunity these students have to study health care while in high school is incredible. If these students have any part in it, the future of health care looks bright. Miranda Jaimes, EDITOR

WHATWE COVER

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Vicki Chen

EDITOR Miranda Jaimes REPORTER Matt Payne

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that a # ects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea Peters ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Miranda Barhydt METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

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MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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WALKER ST.

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LAMAR ST.

Parry’s Pizzeria & Taphouse

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COURTESY PARRY’S PIZZERIA & TAPHOUSE

ELM ST.

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LOGAN ST.

LOGAN ST.

LOGAN ST.

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E LD O RA DO P KWY.

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HUNT ST.

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MCKINNEY RANCH PKWY.

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STACY RD.

W. VIRGINIA ST .

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SRT TOLL

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Cinemark Movies 14

E . L O U I S I A N A S

COURTESY CINEMARK MOVIES 14

W. LOUISIANA ST.

12

WEISKOPF AVE.

FEET ON FIRE? 1XPEQHVV WLQJOLQJ" %DODQFHLVVXHV" 10 TexasMed Healthcare Solutions , an alternative to traditional leasing, will open July 1 at 1400 N. Coit Road, Ste. 302, McK- inney. The business provides fully furnished medical suites with no leases or contracts and no up-front costs. At TexasMed, mem- bers can use exam rooms on a part-time or full-time basis in a shared o $ ce space and receive services such as a reception area with refreshments, medical supplies and o $ ce support. 817-706-7092. www.txmdhealth.com COMING SOON 8 House of Bread Bakery Cafe will open this fall at 7551 Eldorado Parkway, Ste. 100, McKinney. The bakery will o " er bread and pastries freshly baked each day with all products made by hand. https://mckinney.houseo # read.com 9 Pet Bar will open in mid-July at 3041 S. Custer Road, Ste. 700, McKinney. The business provides concierge-level pet grooming and washing with full and self-service supported by high-end equipment in a clean, open-air environ- ment. www.petbarinc.com 5

TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MAP NOT TO SCALE N

CLOYD ST.

AVOID KNEE SURGERY 'LIƓ FXOW\ZDONLQJ" 'LIƓ FXOW\QDYLJDWLQJVWDLUV" 'LIƓ FXOW\NQHHOLQJGRZQ" 'LIƓ FXOW\SLFNLQJXSWKHJUDQGNLGV" 2 Parry’s Pizzeria & Taphouse opened June 14 in McKinney at 3705 W. University Drive, Ste. 100. Parry’s Pizzeria & Taphouse serves pizza, wings, calzones, pasta, sand- wiches, wraps and salads. The eatery also has craft beer, cocktails and wine. 469-215-2126. www.parryspizza.com NOWOPEN 1 The ! rst greater Dallas-area location of Dutch Bros Co ! ee opened May 14 in McKinney. The location at 1401 N. Custer Road marks the company’s 461st shop and the ! fth location in Texas. The company plans to open more than 20 locations in Texas this year. The Oregon-based co " ee franchise has several locations throughout the West Coast and features a variety of co " ee-blended drinks, energy drinks, teas and smoothies. Top-selling drinks include Dutch classic co " ees, Nitro Cold Brew, Dutch Bros Blue Rebel energy drinks, frosts and freezes. 541-955-4700 www.dutchbros.com

3 Apricot Lane had its soft opening June 4 at its location in downtown McKinney. The store is located at 110 W. Virginia St., Ste. 100. Apricot Lane o " ers fashion apparel in regular and junior sizes, as well as accessories, such as handbags and gifts. 214-592-8004. www.apricotlaneboutique.com 4 Magic Cup Cafe had the grand opening for its location at 7701 Stacy Road, Ste. 100, McKinney, June 12 and 13. Drinks at Magic Cup are crafted with high-quality ingredients with fresh, local goods and an inviting atmosphere. Menu items include bubble tea, fruit smoothies, frappes, espresso, and fruit and tea combinations called Special-Teas. 469-714-0448. www.magiccupcafe.com 5 PNC Bank opened May 20 at 3630 W. University Drive, McKinney. The location features a self-service banking kiosk, state- of-the-art technology and gathering spaces that “simulate a kitchen-table conversa- tion,” spokesperson Whitney Wilson said.

469-796-4700. www.pnc.com 6 Vertava Health of McKinney opened April 28 at 7290 Virginia Parkway, Ste. 3100, McKinney. The wellness center pro- vides a variety of treatment services and programs aiming to help individuals work through behavioral health conditions. Plans addressing mental health and addiction will be tailored to ! t personal goals with the help of licensed therapists. 888-527-0530. www.vertavahealthtexas.com REOPENING 7 Cinemark Movies 14 in McKinney reopened May 14. The theater closed in January at 1701 S. Central Expressway, McKinney, due to a limited supply of new ! lm content, a representative from the movie theater chain said. 972-562-0408. www.cinemark.com/theatres/tx- mckinney/cinemark-movies-14 DAVIS ST.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD HANGOUT

LOCALLY " OWNED & OPERATED

Walk-On’s is opening in July. (Courtesy Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux & Bar)

BRING " THIS " AD " IN " FOR " A FREE APPETIZER WITH " THE " PURCHASE OF # ENTREES ONLY " ONE " COUPON " PER " CUSTOMER

RELOCATIONS 11 Cadence Cyclery of McKinney and Wattage Co ! ee Co. have both moved from 129 S. Tennessee St. to 119 S. Ten- nessee St. The new building more than doubles the size for both businesses, which includes two stories with an up- stairs lounge. The move took place at the beginning of May. 972-548-7400. www.cadencecyclery.com/about/ mckinney-pg141.htm 12 Aiotics , an arti ! cial intelligence startup focused on expanding AI and machine learning, is moving from Plano to McKinney. With a grant from the McKinney Economic Development Corp.’s Innovation Fund, the company plans to create 20 new jobs over the next three years. Aiotics has signed a lease for its new headquarters at the Barclays Tech- nology Center, located at 6800 Weiskopf Ave., near Craig Ranch. 877-412-6365. www.aiotics.com 13 Robin Autopilot , a leader in robotic mowing technology and robotics as a service platform, announced it is relocating from Plano to McKinney. With a grant from the McKinney Economic Development Corp.’s Innovation Fund, the company plans to relocate 17 positions and create 58 new jobs over the next three years. Robin Autopilot launched in 2017 with the cre- ation of a ! rst-of-its-kind, emissions-free robotic mowing service. Subscribers to the business have access to software, robotic doors for homes with fences, training and support, and more, depending on the subscription level, according to a MEDC FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott is now a co-owner of Walk- On’s Sports Bistreaux &Bar , which is opening a location next year at 3702 W. University Drive in McKinney. Prescott is the co-owner of the Baton Rouge-based brand’s Dallas-Fort Worth and Waco restaurant locations. “Growing up in Louisiana, my appreciation for Walk-On’s not only stems frommy own love of the atmosphere and Louisiana-inspired cuisine, but also its greater connection to the Dallas community,” Prescott said in a news release.

Walk-On’s serves dishes made from scratch using fresh ingredients. The menu features items with twists on game-day staples and upscale takes on Louisiana favorites, such as craw ! sh etou " ee, duck & andouille gumbo and Krispy Kreme Donut bread pudding. www.walk-ons.com

301 N. Custer Rd. #180 McKinney, Texas 214-592-8841 | ! .com/McKinneyUncorkd UNCORKDBARANDGRILL.COM ORDER " ONLINE " FOR " TAKE " OUT " AT

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news release. Robin Autopilot’s new head- quarters at 7850 Collin McKinney Parkway will initially occupy 10,000 square feet with options for expansion, per the news release. 855-910-8780. www.robinautopilot.com EXPANSIONS 14 Educational resource platform Language Learning Market announced plans June 8 to add 17 new executive jobs to its headquarters in McKinney over the next three years. This will bring its total number of employees to 20. Language Learning Market aims to connect parents and educators searching for learning resources in multiple languages. The platform connects buyers and sellers in 7,000 languages and dialects to help parents ! nd educational content for their children, per a news release from the McKinney Economic Development Corp. Language Learning Market is headquar- tered at MillHouse McKinney at 610 Elm St. www.languagelearningmarket.com ANNIVERSARIES 15 McKinney Wine Merchant cele- brated its 10-year anniversary on April 5 at 131 S. Central Expressway, McKinney. The shop features about 400 wines from around the world, ranging in price from $9 to $400. Owner Andy Doyle brings 20-plus years of industry experience to the table, striving to o " er expert advice, local delivery and other services. 972-542-4636. www.mckinneywine.com

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MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

TO ! DO LIST

June & July events

COMPILED BY MATT PAYNE

JUNE 26 MCKINNEY SUMMER FUN FESTIVAL Indoor and outdoor fun featuring live entertainment, music, food and drinks will be available at this inaugural festival at The Station McKinney. Crafters and vendors will meet the public, and various games will be available. 1-5 p.m. Free. 109 E. Lamar St. 214-842-1706. https://allevents.in/ mckinney 30 THE CADDY RUN Runners and beer-drinkers collide in the return of Cadillac Pizza Pub’s weekly tradition. Guests can meet under the Cadillac sign for an up-to-three- mile run through downtown McKinney. Afterward, participants can enjoy free water, beer specials and pizza for purchase. Walkers are welcome. 6:30- 7:30 p.m. Free. 112 S. Kentucky St. 972- 547-3833. www.mckinneytexas.org JULY 01 ZIN ZEN LIVEMUSIC WITH ERIC ERICKSON Enjoy the musical stylings of Eric Erickson at Zin Zen Wine Bistro. Erickson has a wide range of music in his song list, according to the bistro. He covers many styles of

music, from John Mayer to George Strait. Text 214-315-5042 to make reservations. 7-10 p.m. Free. 6841 Virginia Parkway, Ste. 104. 972-547-4620. www.zinzenwine.com 03 RED, WHITE AND BOOM McKinney residents can celebrate the Fourth of July with free family activities, live entertainment and a ! reworks show organized by the city of McKinney and Craig Ranch. Downtown events will include a hometown parade and a classic car, truck and cycle show. Evening events will feature music, food, children’s activities, a concert and a ! reworks display at McKinney Soccer Complex at Craig Ranch. Free parking is available at Chestnut Street Garage and the Davis Street Garage. All day. Free. Historic Downtown McKinney. 972-547-7480. www.mckinneytexas.org /830/Red-White-and-BOOM 10 MCKINNEYMARGARITA STROLL Venture through downtown McKinney following a map of 15 spots with margaritas to try. Five bonus stops will have samples of other items. The McKinney Margarita Stroll is part of a ! ve-event McKinney Sip & Stroll Series by SBG Hospitality. Proceeds help support Hugs Cafe, which employs adults with special needs. Noon-7 p.m. $30.

JUNE 22

NEWBITS ON THE BLOCK THE COMEDY ARENA

This free stand-up comedy show happens every Tuesday at The Comedy Arena. New Bits On The Block is a show for a sit-down audience where comics can try new material in the works. Comics wishing to perform will ! ll out a signup sheet upon arrival. 8-10 p.m. Free. 305 E. Virginia St. 214-769-0645. www.thecomedyarena.com/open-mic (Courtesy The Comedy Arena)

Historic Downtown McKinney. www.mckinneysipandstroll.com

Find more or submit McKinney events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION

County approves sale of $110.6M in bonds for road, open spacework

crying There is no ‹”‘‘Ƥ‰Ǩ (IF you choose the right roofer)

approved to buy land for the future US 380 freeway in Princeton and Farmersville. Daugherty anticipates these funds will be spent from 2021 to 2024. Proposition B Proposition B includes bonds that can only be used for thoroughfares, Daugherty said. A total of $25 million was approved for the construction of Park Boulevard along the north side of Wylie between Parker Road and Hwy. 78. No completion date for this project was provided. Also under Proposition B, a total of $10 million was approved to buy land for a new thoroughfare. The new thoroughfare will be a realign- ment of FM 546 from the south side of the McKinney National Airport to a connection with US 380 east of Princeton at CR 458. No completion date was provided. An additional $10 million was allocated to “discretionary projects.” Proposition C A total of $2 million was approved to award to various cities and other agencies for parks and open space projects, according to Daugherty. PROPOSITIONB TOTAL: $45MILLION $10MILLION Includes to buy land for a new thoroughfare from McKinney National Airport to US 380 east of Princeton.

BY MATT PAYNE

Collin County commissioners on May 17 approved the sale of $110.6 million in bonds for work on freeways, thoroughfares, and open spaces and parks. Funds for these projects come from the county’s three-proposition 2018 bond program, totaling $750 million, to improve mobility and prevent congestion. Proposition A Proposition A includes bonds that can only be used for freeways, Clarence Daugherty, director of engineering, said. A total of $33.6 million was approved for the construction of a two-lane service road for the outer loop between Preston Road and US 75. The segment from Custer Road to US 75 will use this year’s bonds, and Daugherty said construction should start in late 2022. Construction will last until late 2025, Daugherty said. Also included under Proposi- tion A, a total of $20 million was approved to buy land for the future US 380 freeway in McKinney. Collin County will use funds to try to buy land. Also, a total of $10 million was PROPOSITIONA $20MILLION Includes TOTAL: $63.6MILLION to buy land for future US 380 freeway.

458

5

5

75

380

380

546

N

N

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY " COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JUNE 16. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT MCKNEWS ! COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

9

MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMcKinney

NUMBER TOKNOW

StorybookRanch plans get approved

$0.01

The North Texas Tollway Authority

announced June 1 it will be raising toll rates by $0.01, from $0.19 to $0.20 cents per mile, starting July 1. This increase is part of a biennial toll rate schedule approved by the NTTA board of directors. The last increase was in 2019. Pay- by-mail customers who do not get a TollTag will pay toll rates at least 50% higher. The new rate will a ! ect drivers using the Dallas North Tollway, President George Bush Turnpike, Sam Rayburn Tollway, Addison Airport Toll Tunnel, Lewisville Lake Toll Bridge, Mountain Creek Lake Bridge, Chisholm Trail Parkway and 360 Tollway. Collin County Commissioners Court Meets June 21, 28 and July 12 at 1:30 p.m. www.collincountytx.gov McKinney City Council MEETINGSWE COVER

ELDORADO PKWY.

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

MCKINNEY Developers of Story- book Ranch, where event space was provided in McKinney for more than 20 years, received an OK June 15 to rezone the land for cottage homes. Council approved a request that would allow these smaller homes to be constructed on about 38 acres at 3701 Custer Road, McKinney. The homes would be single-story and for- rent only, with about two acres zoned for commercial uses.

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H ! E ! B to openMcKinney store After the groundbreaking of its Frisco and Plano locations, grocery store chainH ! E ! B announced a newstore inMcKinney. (Matt Payne/Community Impact Newspaper)

BY MATT PAYNE

expansion in the DFWmetroplex,” an H ! E ! B news release read. More details about the new store will be shared at the store’s groundbreaking later this year. “Today is an exciting day for our community,” Mayor George Fuller said in a statement. “H ! E ! B is famous for its wildly committed fan base and unwavering com- mitment to the communities they serve.”

MCKINNEY Grocery store chain H ! E ! B announced June 8 the com- pany plans to open at the northeast corner of Eldorado Parkway and Custer Road. The store is expected to open in spring 2023, according to the announcement. “H ! E ! B is excited to announce plans to open an H ! E ! B store in McKinney, continuing its

Meets July 6, 20 at 6 p.m. www.mckinneytexas.org McKinney ISD Meets June 22 at 7 p.m. www.mckinneyisd.net

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MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

ELECTION

0%-20% 21%-40% 41%-60% 61%-80% 81%-100% MA P S K E Y S P R I N G S L U M P

Voter turnout plunges from November toMay

Enthusiasm for elections waned from November to May. For instance, November voter turnout peaked at 86.86% in one precinct, compared to 43.48% in May’s highest turnout precinct.

Highest precinct turnouts

Lowest precinct turnouts

MAY 2021

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

While local elections allow resi- dents to decide who will represent them on issues such as ! xing local roads, repairing sidewalks, setting trash pickup rates and reviewing developments, it is not easy to get people to vote in these races, said Janice Schie " er, vice president of voter service for the League of Women Voters of Collin County. “Local elections for cities and school boards often run under 10% of the registered voters,” Schie " er said. Local elections in 2020 were pushed fromMay to November to better give people an opportunity to plan for an election in the midst of a pandemic. This meant positions on the McKinney ISD board of trustees and McKinney City Council were on the same ballot as races for the U.S. president, U.S. Senate and state representatives. But without the national races drawing interest in the May 1 election, turnout in the local races dropped signi ! cantly. For instance, in the November election 66,847 regis- tered voters in McKinney weighed in on one city of McKinney proposition, and 76,979 people cast votes on the other. However, the May election for the four propositions fromMcKinney ISD was decided by no more than 19,227 voters. Low participation rates can signi ! cantly a " ect the nature of representation at the ground level of

205 43.48%

NOVEMBER 2020

208 86.86%

100 3.85%

100 43.33%

SOURCE: COLLIN COUNTY ELECTIONS ! COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

a sense that they should be paying attention to elections in government, but when you spread it out [from November to May], you really depress turnout,” he said. One issue with moving local elec- tions to November is losing focus on local priorities, Eshbaugh-Soha said. Longer ballots mean people have to dedicate more time to learning who the candidates are and where they stand on the issues. It’s possible that national politics would drown out the local issues, and people would still choose not to vote on important measures on the ballot. Instead, people may be more inclined to vote when there are more

candidates on the ballot or if some of the items are controversial, Schie " er said. This was the case in May with the city of McKinney, which had mul- tiple candidates running for mayor and City Council positions as well as four school propositions, she said. As a result, the city saw no more than 19.72% for voter turnout, something o # cials consider to be good turnout for a local election, but which paled in comparison to the November election, when at least 57% of the city’s voters participated. “If you have competition, it feels like there’s something really at stake,” Schie " er said.

local government, Schie " er said. “Low turnout means that just a small group of voters will get to decide the elections, and a lot of times, this means that a single issue becomes the contested point in an election rather than the overall governing philosophy,” Schie " er said. Permanently moving city and school elections to November along with statewide and national races is something for which some have advocated, said Matthew Esh- baugh-Soha, chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of North Texas. “You’re more likely to captivate people because they already have

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

JustinBeller seeks to aidwith east side’s needs

Geré Feltus discusses need for a city ‘identity’

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

BY MIRANDA JAIMES

After most recently serving on the Throckmorton Statue Advisory Board, which was formed last year to examine the potential removal of the James Throckmorton statue from down- town McKinney, Justin Beller has transitioned to serving as the McKinney City Council member for District 1. Beller has lived in McKinney for about a decade. During that time, he served on the McKinney Housing Authority, the McKinney Housing Finance Corp., the 2017 bond committee and the advisory council for the statue. In addition, he is a 2012 graduate of the McKinney Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership McKin- ney program. After being in the community and seeing the city’s growth, he was inspired to run for council, he said. “East McKinney has some unique needs that need to be quanti ! ed and advocated for,” Beller said. “There’s just this odd balance of priorities in District 1, and I felt like I was uniquely suited for that.” The city’s growing pains are something Beller said he wants to be able to help District 1 residents with. The city will continue to see new growth and will also rede- velop the east side of McKinney

McKinney’s newly elected District 3 Council Member Ger é Feltus is no stranger to public service. She moved to McKinney about 10 years ago, and it wasn’t long after that she began volun- teering within the community. After making a connection with McKinney Police Chief Greg Conley, she joined his advisory council. She also worked on the public safety bond committee, but things “really picked up” when she was appointed to the McKinney Economic Develop- ment Corp., Feltus said. “I’ve just jumped in,” she said. Running for council initially was not on her radar, she said. She was approached by several people to run once the previous District 3 Council Member Scott Elliott announced he was not running for re-election. She was ultimately persuaded after she spoke to Mayor George Fuller, she said. “He pushed, ‘If not now, then when? And if not you, then who?’” Feltus said. “I say that all the time, and I had to take a look at myself and say, ‘Why not do it?’” McKinney is at an exciting time in its history, she said. The city is busy with projects and has become more progressive and diverse over the years, she said.

with the area where the new city hall is going o " Virginia Street, he said. “That growth is going to impact old McKinney and try to change the culture and dynamics of old McKinney, and so [it’s] just managing that in a way that the people who live here will bene ! t,” Beller said. Aspects of redevelopment will be a bene ! t to the city, Beller said, but they have to be balanced with the risks. He wants to make sure the residents in his district are informed and engaged in the process as the east side of McKinney changes. His experience on the Housing Authority has also shaped his interest in ! nding a balanced housing supply for the city, Beller said. McKinney needs more o " erings, he said. “Our housing supply needs to have that balance so that we are a place for everybody and we do have a place for someone who grows up here to return here and get a job and raise a family here to retire here and live the rest of their life here,” Beller said. “We just need to make sure that we ! nd that in what we provide.”

Health Coaching for Every Body, Every Step of the Way. Goal Setting THE ACCOUNTABILITY YOU NEED. THE SUPPORT YOU DESERVE. “We’re not looking at just the now, but it’s who do we want to be decades from now, and that’s how we’re going to have to really focus our attention when we’re making decisions,” she said. District 3 residents have two primary concerns, Feltus said: one being developing apart- ments the right way, and the other being attainable housing, especially as property taxes escalate. “One way to balance that out is to have a larger corporate tax base,” Feltus said. “We still have to keep a good focus on good economic development.” McKinney will have to focus as more development oppor- tunities come knocking on its door, Feltus said. The city is a sought-after place to live and should have the right to be selective, she said. “The question I pose is, ‘Who does McKinney want to be?’ That we have to ! gure out. I think we have a lot of varying views across the board,” Feltus said. She pointed to Fuller’s focus on casting a vision for the city’s future.

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MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

We’re ready for this moment right here.

From spacious labor and delivery suites to our Level III Maternal Care Center Designation and a Level III NICU, our experienced care team will be with you every moment of the way.

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3K\VLFLDQVSURYLGHFOLQLFDOVHUYLFHVDVPHPEHUVRIWKHPHGLFDOVWDIIDWRQHRI%D\ORU6FRWW :KLWH+HDOWKţVVXEVLGLDU\FRPPXQLW\RUDIǤOLDWHGPHGLFDOFHQWHUV and do not provide clinical services as employees or agents of thosemedical centers or Baylor Scott &White Health. ©2021 Baylor Scott &White Health. 99-MK-247569-Mckyyourmoment AM

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER IS PROUD TO SAY THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSOR

Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – McKinney opened its doors in 2012 to welcome its very # rst patient. Since then, the fully-accredited, not-for-pro # t hospital has continued to grow and expand to better serve the residents of McKinney and surrounding communities. We o $ er personalized care and advanced technology on a beautiful campus with many amenities and all private rooms. Services include emergency care, orthopedics, cancer care, neurosciences, surgical services, primary care, and women’s services, including a Level III Maternal Care Center and Level III Neonatal ICU with private suites. Our care has earned numerous awards and accreditations, including Magnet® recognition for nursing excellence, accreditation and an Outstanding Achievement Award by the Commission on Cancer, and state designation as an Advanced Level III Trauma Facility. The hospital is also certi # ed for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design by the US Green Building Council. For more information or to # nd a physician, visit BSWHealth.com/McKinney.

GOLD SPONSOR

DR. BUCHANAN ORTHODONTICS Dr. Jennifer Buchanan began her orthodontic practice in 1996 and has been creating winning smiles and supporting the McKinney community ever since. Dr. Buchanan earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Secondary Science Education at the University of Texas at Austin, then went on to attain her DDS and Master’s Degree in Orthodontics at Baylor College of Dentistry in Dallas. MCKINNEY CITIZEN OF THE YEAR 2009

MCKINNEY SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR 2002 VOTED BEST ORTHODONTIST OVER 10 TIMES! www.mckinneybraces.com

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

HEALTH OUTCOMES INCLUDE: COMPARING COUNTY HEALTH

Vaccinations for people age 12 and older became available in May. Data is accurate as of June 4. COMBATING COVID ! 19

These rankings are updated annually but include data from previous years. There are other factors included that are not listed.

VACCINATIONS BY ZIP CODE

COLLIN COUNTY

• LENGTHOF LIFE • QUALITYOF LIFE , such as the number of poor mental and physical health days reported

75071

75

2021 STATEWIDE HEALTH CARE RANKINGS ! OUT OF 243 COUNTIES "

COUNTYVACCINATIONS

380

HEALTH FACTORS INCLUDE:

75072

PEOPLE AGE 12+ FULLY VACCINATED

75069

• HEALTHBEHAVIORS , such as smoking, obesity, physical activity, excessive drinking, alcohol-impaired driving deaths, sexually transmitted infections and teen births • CLINICAL CARE , including health insurance coverage; number of physicians, dentists and mental health providers; preventable hospital stays; and ! u vaccinations • SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS , such as educational attainment levels, children in poverty, income inequality and violent crimes • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS , such as air pollution, drinking water violations, housing problems and long commutes

52.53%

HEALTH OUTCOMES

75070

1 1 1

Length of life Overall Quality of life

SRT TOLL

PEOPLE AGE 12+ WITH AT LEAST ONE DOSE

63.21%

N

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL POPULATION FULLY VACCINATED 75069

VACCINATION DEMOGRAPHICS

35.38% 22.55% 44.90% N/A

HEALTH FACTORS

20.15% 6.82% 11.01% 46.80%

Asian Black

75072* 75070 75071

1 1 1

Overall

Health behaviors Socioeconomic Physical environment Clinical care

White Hispanic

SOURCES: ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN POPULATION HEALTH INSTITUTE, COUNTYHEALTHRANKINGS.ORG, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES " COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *75072 IS A NEW ZIP CODE IN MCKINNEY, AND CENSUS POPULATION DATA FOR THIS AREA IS UNAVAILABLE.

3

9.89% 6.33%

Other

Unknown

213

15

MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Damon Braces as a Non-Traditional Option Damon Braces have revolutionized the ortho- dontic landscape! The Damon System uses light force, high-technology, shape-memory wires to PRYHWHHWKPRUHHI¿FLHQWO\8VLQJ'DPRQ%UDF - HVFDQUHGXFHRI¿FHYLVLWVDQGWUHDWPHQWWLPHV WRKHOS\RXEHWWHUPDQDJH\RXUEXV\VFKHGXOH Damon Braces come in a metal or ceramic RSWLRQ)XUWKHU'DPRQRIIHUVDFOHDUFHUDPLF option called Damon Clear, which some patients PD\SUHIHUEHFDXVHWKH\DUHOHVVQRWLFHDEOH In many cases, the Damon System reduces the need for expanders, headgears, tooth ex- tractions, Herbst appliances, and/or jaw surgery when treating many malocclusions (crowding, XQGHUELWHVRYHUELWHVDQGFURVVELWHV ,QP\H[ - perience, it does not matter what age a patient is; Damon Braces is able to treat EVERYONE UHJDUGOHVVRIWKHGLI¿FXOW\RIWKHFDVH$QG because the Damon System uses light, gentle IRUFHVWKHVHEUDFHVFDQKHOSSURPRWHHI¿FLHQW tooth movement and help improve oral health by HOLPLQDWLQJSODVWLFWLHV,KDYHDOVRREVHUYHGWKDW Damon Braces can shorten the time in treatment ZKLOHFUHDWLQJZLGHEHDXWLIXOVPLOHV How Damon Insignia Braces May Shorten Treatment Times Insignia Damon Braces are customized brac- es using the Damon Braces technology of low IULFWLRQDQGORZIRUFHV:LWK,QVLJQLD'DPRQ Braces, each patient has their dental record VFDQQHGLQWRWKHFRPSXWHU,DPWKHQDEOHWR customize and design each patient’s perfect VPLOHXVLQJWKHODWHVWGLJLWDOWHFKQRORJ\,QVLJQLD Damon Braces are like a custom designed suit PDGHWR¿WRQO\WKHSDWLHQWLWZDVGHVLJQHGIRU Because of this innovation in customization, treatment time has been shortened an average of 6 months with Insignia Damon Braces, and IHZHURI¿FHDSSRLQWPHQWV 'U%XFKDQDQVWDUWHG6KRHVIRU6PLOHVLQ ZKLFKKDVDZDUGHGRYHUSDLUVRIQHZ athletic shoes to the Collin County Boys and *LUOV&OXEVWXGHQWVZKLOHUHF\FOLQJRYHU SRXQGVRISUHRZQHGFORWKLQJDQGVKRHV 1RZWKUXHQGRI$XJXVW'RQDWHSUHRZQHG FORWKLQJVKRHVDQGWR\VLQWKHEOXHELQRXWVLGH RXURI¿FH ORFDWHGLQ$GULDWLFD IRUDFKDQFHWR ZLQFXVWRP1,.(VKRHV YDOXH  CALL TODAY SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION FOR NEW SERVICES OR SECOND OPINIONS. (972) 542-4412

A smile makes a difference in overall health and success. Your VPLOHLVWKH¿UVWWKLQJWKDWRWKHUV notice about you. If you do not have the smile you have always wanted, now is the time! There are so many different options available with WRGD\¶VWHFKQRORJ\ My name is Dr. Jennifer Buchan- an, and my orthodontic practice has been in McKinney, Texas for \HDUV7KURXJKRXWP\FDUHHU it has been such an honor and a EOHVVLQJWRKHOSRYHUSD - tients and their families with their VPLOH1RZ,DPWUHDWLQJWKHVHF - RQGJHQHUDWLRQRISDWLHQWVFKLO - dren of the patients I treated as WHHQVZKLFKKDVEHHQYHU\IXO¿OO - LQJ,WUHDWHYHU\W\SHRIPDORFFOX - VLRQLQFOXGLQJFURZGLQJFURVV - bites, underbites, overbites, and VSDFLQJ,VSHFLDOL]HLQGLI¿FXOW cases that would normally require MDZVXUJHU\WRRWKH[WUDFWLRQV KHDGJHDUH[SDQGHUVRUD Herbst™ appliance. 7HFKQRORJ\KDVFKDQJHGVR much over these last 25 years. 0\RI¿FHDOZD\VVWD\VXSWRGDWH with the most current advances in RUWKRGRQWLFWHFKQRORJ\+HUHLVD breakdown of the different types of braces and how we use them in our practice. Deciding Which Type of Braces Are Right for You By Dr. Jennifer Buchanan

Traditional Twin Metal Braces Early in my career, I used traditional twin metal EUDFHV7UDGLWLRQDOWZLQPHWDOEUDFHVFDQVWUDLJKWHQ teeth; however, if a patient has crowding, crossbites, an overbite, or underbite, I would also have to utilize expanders, headgear, extractions, Herbst applianc- HVDQGRUMDZVXUJHU\WRFRUUHFWWKHLUPDORFFOXVLRQ Traditional twin metal braces can also create more SDWLHQWGLVFRPIRUWVLQFHWKH\XVHKHDYLHUIRUFHV

Traditional Ceramic Braces

Ceramic braces are clear braces that are utilized ZKHQDSDWLHQWZDQWVEUDFHVWREHOHVVQRWLFHDEOH Ceramic braces are more fragile than metal braces and are usually recommended for adults or older WHHQV,IDSDWLHQWSDUWLFLSDWHVLQVSRUWVPHWDOEUDFHV DUHXVXDOO\UHFRPPHQGHGRYHUFOHDUFHUDPLFEUDFHV Traditional ceramic braces also have limitations, like a traditional twin metal braces if a patient has FURZGLQJFURVVELWHVDQRYHUELWHRUDQXQGHUELWH $GGLWLRQDOWUHDWPHQWPHWKRGVRIH[SDQGHUVKHDG - gears, tooth extractions, Herbst appliances and/or jaw surgery would need to be used to correct the PDORFFOXVLRQZKHQXVLQJWUDGLWLRQDOFHUDPLFEUDFHV $GGLWLRQDOO\WKHUHFDQEHPRUHSDWLHQWGLVFRPIRUW ZLWKWKHVHWUDGLWLRQDOFHUDPLFEUDFHV

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HOSPITALS

Information on local hospitals in McKinney

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

psychiatrist for patients in the ER. • New programs, expansions: Medical City McKinney is expanding its emergency department and building a three-story patient tower. Construction started in early 2020 and is expected to be complete by December. In addition, the hospital is expanding its behavioral health o # erings and started an outpatient behavioral health program in June. More information about the program is available at 972-547-8888. 3 Methodist McKinney Hospital 8000 W. Eldorado Parkway 972 ! 569 ! 2700 www.methodistmckinneyhospital.com • Trauma level: Not any • NICU level: Not any • Total number of employees: 288 direct employees, 86 contracted personnel • Number of beds: 23 • New programs, expansions: The hospital has made technological advancements that include an upgrade to MRIs and utilizing robotics for surgeries. The hospital o # ered three di # erent robots, the Mako, Rosa and DaVinci, each capable of multiple procedures across various specialties. In addition, the hospital has added a new price transparency tool at www.methodistmckinneyhospital.com/ patient-info/price-estimator.

COMPILED BY MIRANDA JAIMES

1

380

1 Baylor Scott & White Medical Center-McKinney 5252 W. University Drive 469 ! 764 ! 1000 www.bswhealth.com/mckinney • Trauma level: III • NICU level: III • Total number of employees: 825 • Number of beds: 143 • Telemedicine o ! erings: Patients may receive virtual care using the MyBSWHealth app and choose between a video visit or an eVisit. www.bswhealth.com/virtual-care. • New programs, expansions: The hospital is updating its fourth ! oor to include 48 new patient beds, " ve bed dialysis units and bathroom ! ooring designed to help reduce falls. The hospital will have a new total of 191 beds when the ! oor opens in September. 2 Medical City McKinney 4500 Medical Center Drive 972 ! 547 ! 8000 www.medicalcitymckinney.com • Trauma level: III • NICU level: II • Total number of employees: 1,132 • Number of beds: 257 • Telemedicine o ! erings: Virtual visits are o # ered with a clinic physician. The hospital also provides behavioral health telemedicine assessments with a

VIRGINIA PKWY.

75

3

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MCKINNEY RANCH PKWY.

2

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

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Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- McKinney

Medical City McKinney

COURTESY MEDICAL CITY MCKINNEY

COURTESY BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE MEDICAL CENTER $ MCKINNEY

17

MCKINNEY EDITION • JUNE 2021

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