Frisco Edition - March 2020

FRISCO EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 8  MARCH 7APRIL 9, 2020

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When Frisco City Council gathered for its winter work session on the rst day of February, the city’s elected ocials set 10 priorities they believe will dene the year ahead. “We're really kind of laying the groundwork this year for the rest of the city,” Mayor Je Cheney said. “I think we'll look back at 2020 [as] being one of Fris- co’s most transformative years.” Frisco’s annual top 10 priorities lists have led to major successes for the city in the past, the mayor said. Past priorities included seeking destination dining, entertainment and hotels well before Frisco Ranch, KidZania and the Omni Frisco opened. “Frisco is known for being very deliberate and CONTINUED ON 36 City Council’s annual priorities transformFrisco BY WILLIAM C. WADSACK

2016 2020 WHAT IS NEXT? City Council prioritized work on The Star in Frisco development for a couple years before it opened its doors to the public. After the Frisco Public Library was listed as a priority by council in 2019, work to relocate the library to the Beal Aerospace building is slated to begin later this year. future... for the Frisco City Council sets priorities every year. These are some of the major projects from recent years. Shaping u

Council directed sta to go after the “next big thing” for Frisco. It was purposefully left open-ended as no one yet knows what that thing will be.

PHOTOS BY WILLIAM C. WADSACKCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Expansion aims to meet Frisco Family Services’ needs BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS Frisco Family Services expects over 30,000 people to come through its doors in 2030, doubling its cur- rent reach. That is why opening a 22,000-square-foot client services building this November is a vital next

step, according to the nonprot’s leadership. “There is no way we could accom- modate all of that in this small building and [be] what the community needs for us to be,” Executive Director Nicole Bursey said. The new $6 million building near its food pantry and resale store will replace the nonprot’s 4,200-square- foot main facility on 3rd Street. Frisco Family Services oers pre- vention services for food insecurity;

OFFERING A HAND UP The city's largest nonprot that helps those in need continues to grow. Here are its latest numbers for scal year 2018-19.

in annual program support $1.3M

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ELIZABETH UCLÉSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2020 Camp GUIDE

IMPACTS

6 HEALTH CARE

22 LISTINGS

30 THE AUSSIE GRIND

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