Sugar Land - Missouri City Edition | July 2020

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION

REAL ESTATE

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2020EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 11  JULY 6AUG. 2, 2020

growth

Fort Bend ISD

Homes still being built, bought despite COVID19 FBISDmay slowconstruction on schools in growth areas

hot spots

Projected ve-year increase in homes

Over 500 301-500 151-300 51-150

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BY CLAIRE SHOOP

economic downturn caused by the pan- demic. This, coupled with economic uncertainty, has led district ocials to recommend delaying the construction and opening of several new schools. Projectedgrowth In the next ve years, subdivisions including Sienna, Imperial, River- stone and Harvest Green in the Sugar Land and Missouri City area are each expected to add more than 500 new housing occupancies, according to PASA data presented to the FBISD board of trustees earlier this year.

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According to a study from demographic rm Population and Survey Analysts, Fort Bend ISD can expect to see an increase in new homes in

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic this spring, several new developments in Sugar Land, Missouri City and other areas of Fort Bend ISD were expected to add nearly 15,000 new housing occu- pancies in the next 10 years, according to a study from demographic rm Pop- ulation and Survey Analysts. While the coronavirus pandemic ini- tially caused some slowdowns in new home construction and sales, local real estate professionals said these areas picked up again in May. Still, FBISD is anticipating slower enrollment growth following the

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SOURCES: POPULATION AND SURVEY ANALYSTS, FORT BEND ISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER several areas of the district in the next ve years. This will likely cause an increase in enrollment numbers in the district.

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SIENNA PKWY.

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SIENNA: +2,765 homes

ALIANA: +876 homes

HARVEST GREEN: +836 homes

PARKS EDGE: +684 homes

CONTINUED ON 14

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FortBendCountycommunitycontinues tohave conversationsonracial injustice, policebrutality

George Smith drove fromPhiladelphia to pay his respects to George Floyd on June 8. Floyd, whowas a native Houstonian, died in police custody in lateMay.

BY BETH MARSHALL & CLAIRE SHOOP

calling out police brutality and racial injustice. “I think it’s healthy for us to have this continued dialogue so that we’re all on the same page with sni- ing out racism,” Byron Stevenson, pastor of Fort Bend Church said during a virtual discussion hosted by Fort Bend County Judge KP George June 2. CONTINUED ON 19

Although Houston native George Floyd was laid to rest nearly one month ago in southwest Houston near Missouri City, conversations surrounding racial injus- tice are still happening in Fort Bend County. Floyd’s death, which occurred in police custody in Minneapolis in late May, sparked a national movement Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

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SPONSOREDBY • Marine Military Academy 2020 EDI T ION REAL ESTATE

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