Heights - River Oaks - Montrose Edition | Sept. 2022

HEIGHTS RIVER OAKS MONTROSE EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 6  SEPT. 330, 2022

ONLINE AT

Hitting a dry spell

10th-driest year to date since 1985

Third-driest June on record

Hottest June and July on record

Houston rainfall in inches, 200222

IMPACTS

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A severe drought in Harris County was eased somewhat by rain that fell during August.

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28.45*

24.57

TODO LIST

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SOURCE: THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

*THROUGH AUG. 30

I10 project pitched for road ooding

Paul Shinneman, farmer education manager with the nonprot Plant It Forward, inspects crops at one of the group’s urban farms in August.

SHAWN ARRAJJCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Drought eases, but eects could linger

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & GEORGE WIEBE

health, among other areas. “The seasonal outlook calls for the enhanced probability of above-normal temperatures and below normal rainfall for at least now through the end of the

remained in severe drought as of Aug. 29, according to the Texas Water Development Board, and experts said the eects of the dryness in some areas are still being felt, including eects on agriculture, water supply and public

August brought some much-needed rain to the Houston area after June and July were both exceptionally warm and dry. However, portions of Harris County

TRANSPORTATION

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CONTINUED ON 18

Local Starbucks unionization eort signies broader trend

UNIONIZED STARBUCKS

Texas total:

U.S. total:

MUSEUM GUIDE

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BY SOFIA GONZALEZ

Texas is a right-to-work state with only 4% of employers unionized, but that has not stopped Houston workers from attempting to unionize their workplaces. Between the end of 2018 and June 2022, four companies have been unionized in the city, including two in scal year 2021-22, according to the National Labor Relations Board, a group that works for fair CONTINUED ON 20

A Starbucks at Shepherd Drive and Harold Street in Upper Kirby may become the rst to unionize in Houston. SOURCE: NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BUSINESS FEATURE

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#StopHateNow Hate crimes increased by 44% from 2020 to 2021 in the U.S. If you see or experience a hate crime, report it.

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HEIGHTS - RIVER OAKS - MONTROSE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

U.S. News & World Report has spoken.

The face of any award tells you the “what.” But not always the “why.”We are ranked among the nation’s best by U.S. News & World Report. And the best “why” is our unwavering focus on one ideal: the sustained well-being of the last patient to walk out, and the individualized care that’s waiting for the next patient who comes in.

Learn more at StLukesHealth.org/USNWR .

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. Now in 2022, CI is still locally owned. We have expanded to include hundreds of employees, our own software platform and printing facility, and over 30 hyperlocal editions across the state with a circulation to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS MONTH

FROM JAY: September is here, which means school is in full swing, and cooler temperatures are hopefully in our near future. Following record-breaking temperatures in June and July combined with some of the lowest rainfall totals in over 10 years, our area would appreciate the cooler days. Our front- page story details these weather developments and their eects on the water supply. Jay McMahon, GENERAL MANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM SHAWN: Each of our papers features a mix of news items, local business spotlights and guides to your community. This month, we compiled information on what museums can be found around Houston, including well-known museums within the Museum District as well as lesser-known hubs for history, culture and art. Shawn Arrajj, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHAT WE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Jay McMahon SENIOR EDITOR Shawn Arrajj CITY HALL REPORTER Soa Gonzalez SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Anya Gallant ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Dimitri Skoumpourdis METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer COPY EDITOR Kasey Salisbury SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES & MARKETING Tess Coverman CONTACT US

BUSINESS & DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION & DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

HOW WE'RE FUNDED

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened, are coming soon or relocating

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T. C. JESTER BLVD.

Rosland’s Grill & Bar

COURTESY RAYDON CREATIVE

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open dining concept that has private booths, lounge seating, a patio, 11 TVs, and a bar with 36 local beers on tap and

WHITE OAK DR.

W. 6TH ST.

WHITE OAK PARK

cocktails. 713-497-5999. www.crustpizzaco.com

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4 Rosland’s Grill & Bar opened Aug. 9 in the Washington Avenue corridor at 903 Durham Drive, Houston. Menu items include oysters, ocean prime seafood, prime meats carved in-house, aquaponic salads, chef’s sandwiches, burgers and desserts. As for the drinks, patrons can order high-craft cocktails, ne liquors, frozen drinks, curated wines and selected beers from local breweries. A weekend breakfast menu is available on Saturdays and Sundays. 281-888-4169. www.roslands.com 5 The Garden Oaks and Oak Forest neighborhoods got a new hangout spot with the opening of The Upside Pub on Aug. 9 at 3402 N. Shepherd Drive, Hous- ton. Patrons can choose from 14 beers on the inaugural tap list as well as wine, two draft cocktails and a small spirit list. The bar also serves food for lunch, dinner and late-night meals. Menu items include boiled peanuts, a patty melt, a grilled cheese and a California burrito. The bar oers a variety of board games and a shueboard table and airs sporting events. 832-667-8487. www.upsidepub.com 6 The second Houston location of the coee shop La La Land Kind Cafe opened in the Montrose Collective on Aug. 20 at 888 Westheimer Road, Ste. 106, Houston. Drinks include organic fair-trade coees. More than 20 dierent matcha drinks are made with ceremonial-grade matcha imported from family-owned farms in

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MAP NOT TO SCALE

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GREENBRIAR DR.

NOW OPEN 1 Porsche River Oaks hosted a grand opening Aug. 4 at 4007 Greenbriar Drive, Houston. The multimillion-dollar facility oers guests an opportunity to buy used and new cars. Other services include repairs, genuine Porsche parts and auto nancing. According to its website, patrons also have the option to build a custom Porsche in the tting lounge, an

area where customers can feel leather nishes, see paint swatches, and select the design of the steering wheel and shift knob. 888-892-5442. www.momentumporsche.com 2 Houston-based food truck Clutch City Cluckers opened a sixth location in Montrose on Aug. 26 at 1411 Westheimer Road, Houston. The new location serves a variety of items, such as Nashville-in- spired hot chicken sandwiches, cheese-

topped hot chicken sandwiches, chicken tenders, loaded fries, tacos, meatless options, and a novelty brunch menu available on Saturdays and Sundays. www.clutchcitycluckers.com 3 Crust Pizza Co. opened its newest restaurant at 1919 N. Shepherd Drive, Houston, on Aug. 20. The location oers 15 one-of-a-kind pizzas, salads, hand- crafted sandwiches and desserts. Upon walking in, guests are greeted with an

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & SOFIA GONZALEZ

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Pudgy’s Fine Cookies

Lighthouse Immersive

COURTESY MICHAEL MA

COURTESY PATRICK HODGON

Japan. Food items include avocado toast and overnight oats. 713-993-6496. www.lalalandkindcafe.com 7 Italian restaurant and bar Il Bracco opened Aug. 15 at 1705 Post Oak Blvd., Ste. A, Houston. It is the second location of the restaurant for owners Robert Quick and Matt Gottlieb. The menu consists of salads, starters and classic Italian dishes, such as chicken piccata and eggplant Parmesan. 713-532-9950. www.ilbraccorestaurant.com/post-oak 8 Lagniappe Kitchen & Bar opened Aug. 19 at 550 Heights Blvd., Houston. Owner Layne Cruz said she is introduc- ing her “Louisiana” to the Heights. The menu is organized into four categories: breakfast, lunch, all day and happy hour. Dishes include a Sardou omelet, cheddar bacon biscuits, veggie pappardelle and Layne’s gumbo. Beverages include New Orleans-style coee avors, New Orleans cocktails in a low-alcohol format, beer and wine. 713-880-8463. www.lagniappeheights.com 9 A new location of Pudgy’s Fine Cook- ies opened July 31 in the Heights at 1010 N. Shepherd Drive, Houston. The shop’s original Pudgy cookie oers a chocolate chip cookie that is crispy on the outside, chewy on the inside and made with Callebaut chocolate. New avors include Bonanza Brulee, a caramelized banana cookie with a creme brulee cen- ter. 713-538-1503. www.pudgysnecookies.com RELOCATIONS 10 Local Initiatives Support Corp. Houston relocated in early August to

602 Sawyer St., Ste. 205, Houston. LISC Houston oers loans and equity invest- ments, technical assistance and capacity building, and a Greater Opportunities Neighborhood program for disconnected sectors. The group previously worked from 1111 N. Loop West, Houston. 713-334-5700. www.lisc.org/houston 11 A new immersive art exhibit run by the companies Lighthouse Immersive and Impact Museum will move from the Founders District at 1314 Brittmoore Road in West Houston to a new spot at 600 W. Sixth St. in the Heights in early November. Recent exhibits have spotlighted artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo and Claude Monet. At 26,280 square feet, the new space will feature two gallery spaces, taller ceilings and an updated acoustical treatment for high-quality sound engineering. Holiday programming is slated to debut in late November with presale tickets on sale now. www.immersivemonet.com 12 Nonprot Family Houston relocated in early August from a 22,000-square- foot building at 4625 Lilian St., Houston, to a new space at 4950 Memorial Drive, Houston, a space it shares with DePelchin Children’s Center. Founded in 1904, the group provides services such as on-site mental health care, veteran support and nancial stability. Family Houston oers client services on the rst oor of the oce and houses the administrative team on the third oor. 713-861-4849. www.familyhouston.org NAME CHANGES 13 The Sheraton Suites Houston, lo-

A space on West Dallas Street formerly occupied by a trio of Italian restaurants in Montrose will be redeveloped into a district with food concepts and oce spaces. FEATURED IMPACT REDEVELOPMENT After 45 years of service in Montrose, the trio of Vincent Mandola The revitalization will span from West Dallas to West Clay streets. It will begin this fall, and the rst concept is slated to open in late 2022. SHAWN ARRAJJCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

restaurants— Nino’s, Vincent’s, and Grappino di Nino —located at 2817 W. Dallas St., Houston, closed Aug. 5. The restaurants were owned by Vincent and Mary Mandola, who opened Nino’s in 1977. The one restaurant grew into a trio of Tuscan- and Sicilian-inspired venues on one city block. In the 1990s, their daughters, Vinceanne Mandola and Dana Mandola Corbett, joined the family business. The development was purchased by an aliate of Oxberry Group and TKG Capital Partners in 2022. Together, the co-developers plan to revitalize the area into the Harlow District, which will have six food and beverage concepts and two oce spaces. cated in Uptown at 2400 W. Loop South, Houston, will be rebranded as The Chif- ley —a Tapestry Collection hotel by Hil- ton—with an anticipated opening date in November. The rebrand includes a slew of renovations to the 284 suite-style rooms and the 8,000 square feet of meeting space. Included in the renovations is a new restaurant and bar, Rouse, which will oer a fusion of Mexican, barbecue and

“We would like to thank our amazing family, friends, guests and sta for the past 45 years,” Mary Mandola said in a statement. Leasing opportunities for the new development are still available. www.oxberrygroup.com

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CLOSINGS 14 Agricole Hospitality’s Revival Market , a craft butcher shop and cafe at 550 Heights Blvd., Houston, closed July 31. Owners Morgan Weber, Ryan Pera and Vincent Huynh chose to not renew the lease. Instead, Layne Cruz, Revival Mar- ket’s former general manager, will be tak- ing over the space with a new restaurant, Lagniappe Kitchen & Bar.

Asian cuisine. 713-586-2444. www.thechieyhouston.com

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

MORE COMMUNITIES. MORE CONNECTED CARE.

Twice the care. Double the convenience.

River Oaks Clinic

Greater Heights Clinic

Our new clinics in River Oaks and Greater Heights are now open and welcoming new patients.

When it comes to exceptional care right in your neighborhood, Kelsey-Seybold has you covered with two new state-of-the-art clinics. Offering innovative, connected healthcare, both clinics feature specialists in primary and specialty care, plus the convenience of an on-site laboratory and X-ray. There’s even an on-site pharmacy at the Greater Heights location. Same-day or next-day primary care appointments are available now.

Scan to schedule your appointment 24/7, or call 713-442-0000.

Kelsey-Seybold Clinic – River Oaks 2040 W. Gray St., Suites 120 and 200 Houston, TX 77019

Kelsey-Seybold Clinic – Greater Heights 1900 N. Loop W., Suite 400 Houston, TX 77018

Accepting more than 50 health insurance plans, including Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, Humana, KelseyCare, UnitedHealthcare, and more!

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TODO LIST

September & October events

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SEPTEMBER 09 CATCH LATEST WORKS FROM TOURING SONGWRITER Pianist, singer and composer Gabriel Kahane will perform new songs from 31 pieces he curated in October 2020. The songs cover themes such as friendship, fatherhood and marriage as well as the bearings of the internet amid the coronavirus pandemic and climate change. 7:30 p.m. $90+. Stages, 800 Rosine St., Houston. 713-527-0220. www.stageshouston.com 09 ENJOY AUCTIONS, MUSIC AND FOOD The Greater Heights Area Chamber of Commerce will host its annual Chairman Gala. The celebration comprises entertainment, auctions, music, dinner, and gambling. Auction items include Astros tickets, Houston Zoo tickets and maid cleaning services. 7-11 p.m. $99+. Sheraton Brookhollow Hotel, 3000 N. Loop West, Houston. 713-861-6735. www.heightschamber.org 24 ENJOY DJS, RUNNING AND PARTIES The Night Nation Fun Run mixes music and running in the city’s rst-ever running music festival. Participants can run both in and out of Minute Maid Park on a course

SEPT. 24

SUPPORT LOCAL ORCHESTRA’S NEW SEASON THE CHURCH OF ST. JOHN THE DIVINE

OCT. 02

TRY DISHES FROM HOUSTON’S TOP CHEFS AUTRY PARK

In its rst concert of the 2022-23 season, the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, led by Mei-Ann Chen, plays music honoring Houston’s cultural diversity, including works by Juan Pablo Contreras and Beethoven as well as a Vietnamese folk ballad. 7 p.m. $35 (suggested donation). The Church of St. John the Divine, 2450 River Oaks Blvd., Houston. 713-665-2700. www.roco.org

Chefs For Farmers, a Texas-based food and wine festival, will be held in Houston for the rst time, bringing an all-star lineup of local chefs to serve locally sourced dishes. Over 20 chefs are participating in the event, and brewers will also serve alcoholic beverages. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Houston Food Bank. 2-5 p.m. $115. Autry Park, 3737 Cogdell St., Houston. www.chefsforfarmers.com

COURTESY RIVER OAKS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

COURTESY CHEFS FOR FARMERS

24 WATCH LOCAL ARTISTS MAKE PROJECTS The eighth annual iteration of Artcetera, an interactive live art show, allows guests to watch Houston-based artists work on projects while enjoying food, cocktails and raes. A portion of auction proceeds will go to The Pablove Foundation, a

nonprot that teaches photography to children with cancer. The auction, which also runs online, features works from more than 20 local artists, including local art scene mainstays and rising stars. 7-10 p.m. $100 (advance), $125 (at the door). Winter Street Studios, 2101 Winter St., Houston. www.artceterahouston.com

featuring party zones followed by an after party with DJs, light shows and bubble zones. Registration comes with gear, glow sticks, access to concerts and free giveaways. 5 p.m. (festival begins), 7:30 p.m. (race begins). $34.99+. Minute Maid Park, 501 Crawford St., Houston. www.nightnationrun.com/houston

Find more or submit Heights, River Oaks and Montrose events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

YOUR PUBLIC HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

Here. THERE IS A PLACE FOR YOU

LIFESAVING CARE FOR ALL

Join us on Sunday, September 11 for breakfast, fellowship, and connection to the many ministries kicking off this fall at First Presbyterian Church.

As the public health champion for Harris County, Harris Health System offers award-winning medical care and health-related services to keep our community safe and healthy. Thank you for your support.

9:30 AM | Breakfast 10:45 AM | Worship

Scan QR code to learn more

5300 MAIN ST | MORE EVENTS AT FPCHOUSTON.ORG/EVENTS

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

NOT JUST A PLACE TO GO, A PLACE TO LEARN AND EXPLORE.

Get back to your routines and reconnect with your community this fall through a variety of engaging activities and programs for all ages. Achieve, Belong and Connect this Fall at the Y.

• Before and After School Care • Fall Youth Sports • Y Teen L.I.F.E. • Swim Lessons and Swim Team • Group Exercise Classes

LEARN MORE: ymcahouston.org

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES Proposed elevation project on I10 spurs concerns

COMPILED BY SOFIA GONZALEZ

UPCOMING PROJECTS

KIAM ST.

Some Heights-area residents are concerned about a proposed $347 million project by the Texas Depart- ment of Transportation that involves elevating I-10 in an eort to mitigate future roadway ood risks from White Oak Bayou. The state- and federally funded project would stretch about 1.8 miles from Heights Boulevard to I-45, TxDOT Public Information Ocer Deidrea George told Community Impact Newspaper . If the project moves forward, the number of lanes on I-10 in the targeted area would not change, George said. The existing lane conguration—which includes ve 12-foot-wide lanes in each direction, a 10-foot-wide inside lane, 10-foot- wide outside shoulders and one 14-foot-wide high-occupancy vehicle lane in each direction—would be reconstructed at an elevated level, she said. According to TxDOT documents, a 21.7-acre detention pond will be located under the elevated area on the north side of I-10 between Taylor Street and Houston Avenue along with a 10-foot-wide shared-use path for pedestrians and cyclists that will connect to the existing trail system on the north side of I-10 along White Oak Bayou between Studemont Street and I-45. According to TxDOT’s presenta- tion, the proposed elevated area has repeatedly been aected by major rain events, such as Tropical Storms Allison and Imelda and Hurricane Harvey. Once ooded from White Oak Bayou, the main lanes become

Proposed I10 elevation A portion of I-10 would be elevated to alleviate ooding from White Oak Bayou.

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ONGOING PROJECTS Funding source: Houston Dedicated Drainage and Street Renewal Capital Fund Cottage Grove East improvements During an Aug. 3 meeting, Houston City Council approved an additional $290,448 for ongoing design work on a capital improvement plan project in District C’s Cottage Grove East neigh- borhood, where construction could begin in early 2023. The scope of the project is to improve storm drainage, concrete paving, underground utili- ties, sidewalks, curbs and driveways. Timeline: winter 2023-TBD Cost: $25.7 million

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Timeline: construction to begin in 2024 Cost: $347 million Project length: 1.8 miles

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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impassable. Kevin Strickland with CURBS Houston—a community group of Heights residents seeking to create a safer neighborhood—said he has concerns about TxDOT’s eorts to keep I-10 from ooding at that point. He said I-10 becoming a “lake” during Hurricane Harvey saved area neigh- borhoods from ooding. “[The project] doesn’t make sense,” Strickland said. “It’s completely unnecessary.” Strickland also said TxDOT’s proposal is slowing down the METR- ORapid University Corridor project—a rapid bus transit line that is projected to run from Westchase Park & Ride to Tidwell Transit Center. However, George said TxDOT is doing its due diligence through collaborative partnerships with other entities. Resident Matt Tetlow said he does not support the project. Along the Washington Avenue corridor, where Tetlow lives, he said there are already issues with noise from roads. He said

he thinks the problem will worsen with this project. “There’s a lot of noise impacts that really hurt people who live where I live,” Tetlow said. “I’d like to see us do something smarter. ... This is an organization that is a hammer, and everything looks like a nail—build it wider, bigger, taller, right? I’d like to see them take more local input to nd win-win projects.” George said TxDOT is open to public feedback, and those who would like to give input can do so until Sept. 9. Once the public comment period ends, the project will go through a series of phases. From this fall through fall 2023, environmental documents and a detailed schematic design will be developed. In winter 2023, an environmental decision will be made, and in summer 2024, construction is anticipated to begin. “This is why we’re here,” George said. “We certainly are taking all of [the concerns] into account.”

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Montrose water line work Construction began this summer on a 72-inch water line project intended to carry water to Houston’s South- west Pump Station. The project also includes improvements to wastewater and water utilities, trac signals and street signs; the replacement of street lights; the removal and planting of trees; and new concrete sidewalks. Timeline: summer 2022-summer 2024 Cost: $48.8 million Funding source: city of Houston

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 31. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT HRMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

TWU Houston Open House Sept. 17, 10 a.m.-noon Texas Medical Center

MBA • Health Care Administration • Nursing • Nutrition & Food Science • Occupational Therapy • Physical Therapy

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

Building bridges

PARKS & RECREATION Groups calls for pedestrian bridges to connect area trails

The two proposed bridges would help ll a 1.3-mile gap between existing bridges over White Oak Bayou in the community. The goal is to provide a more convenient connection for pedestrians between communities in the Heights and those south of I-10.

Proposed Existing

Cottage Grove bridge

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“This [project] ... seemed like it was really low-hanging fruit because it’s so easy to do, yet it’s so transformative.” EMMANUEL NUNEZ, FOUNDER OF A TALE OF TWO BRIDGES

BY SOFIA GONZALEZ

The Texas Department of Trans- portation is already taking the lead on one bridge near Rutland Street, having been awarded $2.4 million by the Houston-Galveston Area Council for the project. Plans for the second bridge at Patterson Street have not yet developed. After launching an Instagram page to raise awareness, Nunez said people were immediately excited, calling the project something that is “missing from the community.” “So this happened to be [a proj- ect] that seemed like it was really low-hanging fruit because it’s so easy to do, yet it’s so transformative,” Nunez said. The two bridges would also provide improved access to transit stops and safer access to schools, businesses and churches along the Washington Corridor, Nunez said. ATOTB garnered support from

PATTERSON PARK

Community advocates came together at Patterson Park on Aug. 10 to raise awareness for a project that would connect the Heights area to neighborhoods south of I-10 with two new bridges. The group that set up the meeting, A Tale of Two Bridges, was started by Heights resident Emmanuel Nunez in February. The project calls for building two bridges over White Oak Bayou to give pedestrians and cyclists easier access between the MKT Trail in the Heights and the White Oak Bayou Trail, which runs through the Heights while also connecting to communities south of I-10 and the Bualo Bayou Trail. There is a 1.3-mile gap between existing bridges over White Oak Bayou in the area: the Cottage Grove bridge and the bridges at Heights Boulevard and Yale Street.

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SOURCE: A TALE OF TWO BRIDGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Mayor Sylvester Turner, who said the project is about designing a city for the future that is focused on multi- modal forms of transportation. “It’s about building a resilient city,” Turner said at the Aug. 10 event. Houston Chief Transportation Planner David Fields said the project is in its infancy, but city sta is happy to work on the design and coordina- tion with entities such as the TxDOT. Those who travel by bike do not

have many direct routes, BikeHous- ton Executive Director Joe Cutrufo said. Instead, they are forced to take a roundabout way to nd streets that are safe and connected to trails. Despite being in the early stages of the project, Nunez said he would like to see the two bridges completed by the 2026 World Cup. “I want people to see Houston not as the city of freeways, but as the city of parks,” Nunez said.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY & COUNTY

News from Houston & Harris County

COMPILED BY RACHEL CARLTON & SOFIA GONZALEZ

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS HOUSTON On Aug. 16, Houston began giving intradermal monkeypox vaccinations—an injection just under the skin— expanding eligibility to 26,000 people living with HIV in Harris County. The change follows revised guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HOUSTON On Aug. 24, the Houston City Council voted to approve spending $539,000 on gift cards for future gun buyback events. The next event, which will take place in the Alief area before the end of the year, will see a tripling of stang and car lanes, city ocials said. Houston City Council will meet for both public comment and regular business at 9 a.m. Sept. 7 at 901 Bagby St., Houston. Meetings are streamed at www.houstontx.gov/htv. Harris County will meet for its regular meeting at 10 a.m. Sept. 13 at the Harris County Courthouse, 1001 Preston St., Ste. 934, Houston. Meetings are streamed live at www.harriscountytx.gov. MEETINGS WE COVER

Houston votes to place bonds on ballot

Harris County bond to go before voters in November HARRIS COUNTY Members of Harris County Commissioners Court voted 3-2 on Aug. 18 to place $1.2 billion in bonds on the November ballot. The vote cements the 3-2 split vote from the Aug. 2 meeting of Commissioners Court with Precinct 3 Commissioner Tom Ramsey and Precinct 4 Commis- sioner Jack Cagle again opposed to the bond issue. Voters will vote on the three key areas—$900 million for roads, drainage and multimodal transportation; $200 million for parks; and $100 million for public safety facilities—in separate bond referendums. The county bond will appear on the same ballot for voters who live in city of Hous- ton, which approved an ordi- nance Aug. 17 for a $478 million public improvement bond.

HOUSTON In a 16-1 vote, Houston City Council approved an ordinance during its Aug. 17 meeting that orders an election to be held Nov. 8 for Houstonians to vote on $478 million in public improvement bonds. According to the 2022 bond elec- tion memo, projects were identied in the 2023-27 capital improvement plans as “future bond elections.” The bulk of the $478 million gure is tied to Proposition A, which would help pay for renovations and mainte- nance at re and police department facilities. Other propositions cover parks, animal care services, public health, general improvements, librar- ies and the solid waste department. Voters can choose which individual propositions to support. Bond funds would also be used to pay for $194 million in already- planned projects that currently have no funding. Included in the propositions is $274 million that could be used for 2028 and beyond. This would help future

BOND BREAKDOWN Voters will be asked to weigh in on seven separate propositions. Prop A (public safety): $270M Prop B (parks): $60M

Prop C (animal care): $47M Prop D (public health): $33M Prop E (general permanent improvements): $29M Prop F (libraries): $26M Prop G (solid waste): $6M

SOURCE: CITY OF HOUSTON COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

councils by increasing spending exibility to avoid having to schedule future smaller bonds, according to the memo. According to a press release from the city, the bonds will not increase property taxes.

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HEIGHTS  RIVER OAKS  MONTROSE EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2022

GUIDE

A guide to local museums in 2022

HOUSTONAREA MUSEUM

2022

GUIDE COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & RENEE FARMER DESIGNED BY ANYA GALLANT

4 Color Factory I 347-378-4071 www.colorfactory.co 5 McClain Gallery* C M 713-520-9988 www.mcclaingallery.com 6 Art of the World C M 713-526-1201 www.artoftheworldgallery.com 7 Foltz Fine Art** F C 713-521-7500 www.foltzgallery.com 8 Archway Gallery F C 713-522-2409 www.archwaygallery.com 9 Barbara Davis Gallery C 713-520-9200 www.barbaradavisgallery.com 10 Anya Tish Gallery C 713-524-2299 www.anyatishgallery.com *APPOINTMENTS ENCOURAGED BUT NOT REQUIRED **OPEN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

The Houston area is home to a number of museums and galleries. Lists in this guide are not comprehensive.

Rienzi COURTESY MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON

Rienzi The historic house museum features a collection of European decorative arts, paintings and furnishings. 1406 Kirby Drive, Houston 713-639-7800 www.mfah.org/visit/rienzi Cost: $10 (adults), $8 (ages 65 and older), $5 (college students and ages 13-18), free (ages 12 and under) Local spotlight

1 Moody Gallery C 713-526-9911 www.moodygallery.com 2 Laura Rathe Fine Art F C 713-527-7700 www.laurarathe.com 3 Christopher Martin Gallery C 346-330-9832 www.christophermartin gallery.com F Fine art C Contemporary M Modern I Installation Art galleries A variety of art galleries can be found in Montrose and River Oaks, including many that are artist owned.

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COURTESY ARCHWAY GALLERY

Museum Guide 2022

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Houston Museum District The Houston Museum District comprises 19 museums in an area north of Hermann Park and east of Rice University. Highlights include The Museum of Fine Arts, the Houston Museum of Natural Science and the Houston Zoo.

The garden showcases works by 20th- and 21st-century sculptors. Sculptor Isamu Noguchi created the garden, which is framed by concrete walls and dotted with native trees, bamboo and crepe myrtle. Montrose Boulevard and Bissonnet Cullen Sculpture Garden Science museums 16 Children’s Museum Houston 17 Houston Museum of Natural Science 18 Houston Zoo 19 The Health Museum Historical museums 12 Bualo Soldiers National History Museum 13 Czech Center Museum 14 Holocaust Museum Houston 15 Houston Museum of African American Culture

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HOUSTON SUPERSTORE 2410 Smith Street 713-526-8787 WESTCOTT AND MEMORIAL 5818 Memorial Dr 713-861-4161 SHEPHERD 1900 S Shepherd 713-529-4849

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY OLIVER CAPITO

ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES Because the avor and eects of tea can change based on how it is brewed, Chris McKann, owner of The Path of Tea, said new variations are being discovered all the time. TEA LEAF: Traditional teas made from tea leaves vary from white tea on the less caeinated end to the stronger black teas. ROOIBOS: This herbal tea is brewed from the “red bush” plant in South Africa. TISANES: This caeine-free herbal tea dates back to ancient China and Egypt. OTHER HEALING TEAS: Other teas on the menu are pitched as ways to help with colds and us, sinus issues, and boost the functioning of the lung and liver.

Owner Chris McKann founded The Path of Tea with his wife, Thia McKann, in 2006.

Freshly brewed teas are served hot at the River Oaks staple. (Photos by Oliver Capito/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Path of Tea Shop owner looks to bring peace to stressed Houstonians T ea has always been second to coee in the U.S., a trend The Path of Tea owner Chris McKann said is tied to our fast-paced

over 140 dierent types of tea, each of which has a dierent taste and can oer a dierent health benet, Chris said. Some teas have immune system-boosting eects, while others give energy, he said. The menu features dierent types of white, green, oolong, pu-errh, black and other herbal teas. The shop’s tea leaves come from a variety of countries, mostly from Asia, Chris said. The Path of Tea hosts events regularly, Chris said, including weekly tea tastings, where guests can drink tea samples while Chris explains where the tea leaf comes from and how he makes it. “Sometimes we have people who talk about some health aspect that would t in with tea,” he said. Although Thia has since passed away, Chris said he carries on her legacy at the shop. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, people are feeling more stressed than ever, and Chris said he plans to keep relieving people from their anxiety with his tea.

Guests at The Path of Tea can choose their tea cup from a shelf of options.

lifestyles. However, as interest in mental and physical well-being has become more mainstream, McKann said more interest has also been directed at his shop, founded in 2006 in River Oaks as a place for people to stop by, enjoy some tea and take a social break from daily stressors. “People are getting really stressed out,” he said. “And so I’m nding that more people are telling me, ‘Oh my God, this [tea] is nice.’ [We] just have this energy where it’s just more relaxing, right? So they start discovering tea.” The Path of Tea was founded by Chris and his wife, Thia McKann, after the latter was certied as a tea master, a designation given to people who demon- strate an understanding of the dierent types of teas and how they are brewed, Chris said.

The Path of Tea 2340 W. Alabama St., Houston 713-252-4473 www.thepathoftea.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 11:30 a.m.-8 p.m.

BRAND BUSINESS your WITH STICKIES Exclusive front cover placement • Targeted mailbox delivery • Competitive pricing The couple wanted to focus on giving customers an organic, healthy tea, Chris said. The shop oers “People are becoming more conscious of their physical health,” he said. “[The] pandemic [has] really accelerated that.”

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

FROM THE PODCAST Eric Berger Co-founder of Space City Weather

"OUR GOAL WITH THE SITE IS TO KIND OF CUT THROUGH THE NOISE AND FIND THE SIGNAL FOR PEOPLE. IT’S WEATHER FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE BUSY AND MAYBE ONLY REALLY WANT TO FOCUS ON THE WEATHER WHEN THEY HAVE TO MAKE DECISIONS." ERIC BERGER, SPACE CITY WEATHER CO FOUNDER

BY OLIVIA ALDRIDGE

The United States is in the middle of its Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. On the June 24 episode of “The Houston Breakdown,” Com- munity Impact Newspaper ’s weekly local podcast, host Olivia Aldridge spoke with local weather expert Eric Berger about how Houstonians can prepare for hurricane risk. The founder of local forecasting service Space City Weather also dug into the story of his platform’s rise to prominence during Hurricane Harvey in 2017. WHAT DOES SPACE CITY

is happening to them is probably hap- pening to me and my family as well. I think it’s that we built a connection to readers by talking directly to them, not trying to scare them, but by telling them what we know, what we don’t, what we’re watching, and just being really honest and real with people. DID THE PUBLIC RESPONSE TAKE YOU BY SURPRISE? Absolutely. ... I had written about weather at the Houston Chronicle from 2005 to 2015. When I left that year, I founded Space City Weather as a hobby. Then, two years later with Harvey, it really did, as you said, blow up into something much more than that. So yeah, it surprised me how much people really do appreciate that kind of informa- tion and that kind of approach. It certainly just caused [co-founder Matt Lanza] and I to really double down on that and try to be there at all times for people.

WEATHER DO, AND WHAT HAS YOUR JOURNEY WITH IT BEEN? There’s a million places you can get weather information online, on televi- sion and in apps. What we wanted to be was a place you could go to when you really wanted to know what’s important and what’s not. During this time of year, on places like Facebook and other social media, you’ll often see posts [predicting] a hurricane strike in Texas 10 days from now and a lot of things like that. Our goal with the site is to kind of cut through the noise and nd the signal for people. WHY DO YOU THINK SPACE CITY WEATHER FIRST RESO NATED WITH PEOPLE DURING HURRICANE HARVEY? I think it’s the human element. I am rst and foremost a writer; meteorology came much later on for me. I really try to connect with readers. I live in Houston, so whatever

COURTESY ERIC BERGER

WHAT DO YOU THINK WE CAN EXPECT HEADING INTO THIS HURRICANE SEASON? This year looks to be busy again for a number of reasons, principally because La Niña, which is in the Pacic Ocean, looks to be present in August, September and October of this year, which is prime time for Atlantic hurricanes to form. So generally, we can expect a busier season, but Houston can get hit during nonbusy seasons [as well]. HOW CAN PEOPLE PREPARE? I think the most important thing for people to do is to understand the threats to them, their home, where they live and their family. That means

knowing [if you’re in an area] that could be vulnerable to storm surge, and that’s driven primarily by your elevation and how close you are to a body of water or a bayou. ... You need to understand your vulnerabilities now and prepare accordingly. If, for example, you decide [you] need to evacuate for whatever reason, then ... where would you evacuate? How are you going to make reservations? What are you going to bring? How are you going to make sure your pets are taken care of or your families or your parents or your children? You’ve got to think about all that now because when the moment hits, it’s very stressful.

This is an excerpt from an interview for “The Houston Breakdown,” Community Impact Newspaper ’s weekly local podcast, lightly edited for length and clarity. “The Houston Breakdown” is hosted by Olivia Aldridge and released every Friday morning wherever podcasts are available. Listen to the full interview for more of Berger’s insights on topics including space ight in Texas and the importance of building a Spanish-language weather forecasting platform for Houston.

The Houston BREAKDOWN

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