Bay Area Edition | March 2022

BAY AREA EDITION

VOLUME 4, ISSUE 8  MARCH 25APRIL 21, 2022

ONLINE AT

INSIDE

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IMPACTS

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TxDOT plans to widen FM646 in League City

HELENHALL LIBRARYREBOUNDS FROMCOVID19, LOOKS TOFUTURE

Exterior - 1986

Exterior - 2019

TRANSPORTATION

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News fromthe 2022 primary elections

Staircase - 1987

Interior - 1979

Interior - 2022

Staircase - 2022

PHOTOS COURTESY HELEN HALL LIBRARY

CAMP GUIDE 2022 ELECTION RESULTS

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Foster childrenwithout placement rise across Harris, Galveston counties

A GROWING PROBLEM The number of children without placement in the Texas foster care system, or CWOP, has risen since 2020. The average number of days spent in CWOP rose from 2 days in February 2020 to 18.2 days in August 2021.

BY CHANDLER FRANCE, WESLEY GARDNER & JAKE MAGEE

The number of children without placement in the Texas foster care system has skyrocketed over the last two years, increasing by more than 1,100% since October 2019, according to data provided by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services. According to DFPS ocials, individuals in the state’s foster care system receive a “childwithout placement” designation, or CWOP, when the state cannot nd a suitable and safe placement for that child, requiring the DFPS to provide temporary emergency care until a placement can be secured. Over the last two years, the state has increasingly relied on unli- censed placements—often motels or oce buildings—overseen by caseworkers. In October 2019, 32 children were in such place- ments statewide, according to DFPS data. By August 2021, the CONTINUED ON 20

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SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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BAY AREA EDITION • MARCH 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: It’s hard to believe that in two short months the kids will be out of school for summer, but this is the time of year to start planning both your summer vacations and camps for the kids. Our annual Camp Guide (see Page 14) has local options to help both entertain and enrich learning for your children. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROM JAKE: I’m back! From mid-November to early February I was on leave to enjoy time with my new baby, but I’m happy to get back to reporting about the things you need to know. See you around the Bay Area! Jake Magee, EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Papar Faircloth EDITOR Jake Magee REPORTER Sierra Rozen

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

GRAPHIC DESIGNER James Inglish METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schaer ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1, Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 PRESS RELEASES baynews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

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BAY AREA EDITION • MARCH 2022

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

NOWOPEN 1 Anytime Fitness opened its League City location Feb. 24 after months of delays. The new gym is located at 1062 FM 646, Ste. C, League City, and oers 24-hour health and tness services. It also oers tness consultations, team workouts and one-on-one training to help patrons achieve tness goals. The franchise has locations across the United States with multiple in Texas. 409-795-1347. www.anytimetness.com 2 Miss A opened a location at Baybrook Mall, 500 Baybrook Mall Drive, Friend- swood, in February. Miss A sells feminine products, including makeup, spa, eyelash, skin care and household products. A phone number was not available as of press time. www.shopmissa.com 3 After over a year of being closed, Big League Dreams reopened March 5 with a three-day tournament for 60 baseball teams from Texas, Arizona, California, Maine and other states. The facility at 1150 Big League Dreams Parkway, League City, includes youth and adult baseball elds modeled after professional stadiums. League City City Council in January voted to end the city’s contract with Big League Dreams, closing the facility, because it had fallen into disrepair. A new owner, TC Sports Group, has since taken over and invested $2 million to x and upgrade the elds. 281-316-3400. http://leaguecity.bigleaguedreams.com 146 MAP NOT TO SCALE 000 PGBT TOLL SRT TOLL DNT TOLL 000 TOLL 000A TOLL MOPAC 000 N N 000 0000 P GALVESTON BAY 96

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COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

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COMING SOON 4 Buttermilk Sky Pie Shop will open in early 2022 at The Lawn at Baybrook Mall, 700 Baybrook Mall Drive, Ste. D103, Friendswood. The business sells pies in a variety of avors, including Southern custard, chocolate cream, key lime, peanut butter cream and chewy chocolate chip. The pie shop has loca- tions across Texas and other states. www.buttermilkskypie.com 5 TIRR Memorial Hermann Outpatient Rehabilitation - Southeast on March 10 celebrated its groundbreaking ceremony. The new, state-of-the-art facility will be the seventh outpatient rehabilitation site by the time construction is complete at the end of 2022 at 300 Rogers Court, Webster. The institute will provide rehabilitation services to adults and children with neuro- logical, oncological and medically complex

CLEAR LAKE

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & SIERRA ROZEN

according to the mall’s website. A timeline for the opening has not been revealed. The restaurant, which has locations in Tomball, Magnolia and the Woodlands Mall, serves tacos, tortas and burgers along with sea- food, soups and desserts. www.bigotesstreettacos.com 11 Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux will open in Webster sometime in the next year. The restaurant will be located in front of the Academy Sports + Outdoors store at 21351 Gulf Freeway. The sports restaurant franchise serves soups, salads, seafood, steak, sandwiches, po’boys, wraps, tacos and burgers. www.walk-ons.com 12 JMK5 Holdings , a real estate devel- oper prominent in Galveston County and beyond, is in the process of creating an of- ce building at 600 Gemini St., Houston. A completion date has not been determined. The 365,000-square-foot facility will be broken up into four pods of 90,000 square feet each. Spaces from 3,000 square feet and up will be available to own or lease, and each of the four pods will have its own separate lobby for business owners and guests. www.jmk5holdings.com SCHOOL NOTES After nearly ve years since the $487 million 2017 bond was passed, Clear Creek ISD will celebrate the recent completions of some of these projects. The district will hold multiple ribbon-cutting ceremonies in March and April to commemorate the nished construction. The projects being rec- ognized include renovations to Walter Hall Elementary School, the rebuild of Clear View High School, the renovations to Ed White Elementary School and the renovations to C. D. Landolt Elementary School. The ceremonies are by invitation only but will be livestreamed to the public on the district’s website and the district’s Facebook. The ribbon-cuttings will take place March 30 at 10 a.m. for Ed White Elementary School and April 1 at 9 a.m. for C.D. Landolt Elementary School. Past ribbon cuttings includ- ed Walter Hall Elementary School on March 11 and Clear View High School on March 24, which was set to take place after press time. These bond projects have been in the works since they were passed in 2017 and also include

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Lagoonfest Texas takes place at Lago Mar in Texas City.

COURTESY LAGOON DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

renovations and rebuilds to various other elementary, intermediate and high schools. A full list of the bond projects can be found on CCISD’s website. 281-284-0000. www.ccisd.net CLOSINGS 13 The Clear Lake Scout Shop at 1300A Bay Area Blvd., Ste. 129, Lagoonfest, now in its third season, is a beach experience at the Lago Mar master-planned community, 3240 Lago Mar Blvd., Texas City. The 2,033-acre community surrounds a 12-acre crystal- clear lagoon—the largest in Texas—that emulates a natural beach. representative and help with the daily operation of Lagoonfest Texas, which kicked o March 11 with a spring break celebration. ARM will help develop the owners’ vision for the project along with programming, themes and overall messaging, the release said. ARM and its team of industry experts have experience in waterpark and hotel project development and management. “Our goal is to provide a unique luxury beach life experience with great customer service delivering smiles to the thousands of families that will visit our new and improving attraction,” said Uri Man, Lagoon Development Company’s FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS The Lagoon Development Company has selected American Resort Management to manage Lagoonfest Texas 2022, according to a press release. ARM will act as the owner’s CEO. “For this reason, we sought out best-in-class talent to manage the facility.”

“We are excited to support the operation of this beautiful crystal clear lagoon. This is truly one of Texas’ most unique destinations,” American Resort Management CEO Richard Coleman said. “This will be a destination that is sure to provide outstanding and unforgettable guest experiences for years to come.” The lagoon is the centerpiece of a future 100-acre entertainment district. Future plans for the community include a beach club, hotels, retail shops, restaurants and new entertainment venues, according to the release. The partnership will bring availability for group visits, birthday parties, summer passes and other experiences at Lago Mar, winner of Master-Planned Community of the Year in 2021 in the Greater Houston Builders Association’s Houston’s Best PRISM Awards, according to the release. www.lagoonhouston.com

Fat Shack

COURTESY SPACE COAST TEXAS

diagnoses. www.memorialhermann.org/ services/specialties/tirr

6 Fat Shack , a restaurant that has been featured on TV’s “Shark Tank,” will open in Webster sometime in the next year. It will be located at 1020 NASA Parkway, inside the Webster Point Shopping Center. The chain specializes in late-night bites, in- cluding burgers, wings, fried Oreos, Philly cheesesteaks, milkshakes and more. www.fatshack.com 7 BoomerJack’s Grill will open in its rst location outside of the Dallas-Fort Worth area in Webster in the coming months. It will be located at I-45 and Magnolia Ave- nue, right in front of the Cinemark movie theater. The restaurant serves chicken wings, soups, salads, wraps, quesadillas, atbreads, sandwiches, burgers and des- serts. www.boomerjacks.com 8 AMOCO Federal Credit Union in the coming months will open at 1150 Clear Lake City Blvd., Ste. 102, Houston. A timeline for the opening has not been announced. The credit union has several locations across the Bay Area, including Clear Lake, Nassau Bay, Friendswood and Galveston. 800-231-6053. www.amocofcu.org 9 Bath and Body Works will open in a new location in Webster in April. It will be located next to Sun and Ski Sports at 1355 Bay Area Blvd., Webster. The national chain sells products, such as hand sanitizer, hand soap, candles, hand and body lotion, wall plug-ins and decor to hold such products. www.bathandbodyworks.com 10 Bigotes Street Tacos is expect- ed to open soon at the Baybrook Mall, 500 Baybrook Mall Drive, Friendswood,

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Houston, closed March 5. Certain Boy Scouts of America members tried to stop the closure by starting a petition on www.change.org. Local Boy Scouts Member Frank Razem said the closure was part of a national decision to save money. The store sold uniforms, camp- ing supplies, books and other items for the Boy Scouts. www.facebook.com/ clearlakescoutshop

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BAY AREA EDITION • MARCH 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES TxDOT plans towiden FM646 in League City

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE

UPCOMING PROJECTS

The Texas Department of Trans- portation is considering the next step in a multiphase plan spanning years to widen FM 646. In 2005-06, TxDOT held public meetings to discuss a plan to widen FM 646 from I-45 to Bayshore Boulevard. Part of that project is already done. “The portion between I-45 and Edmund Way—approximately 1.3 miles—has since been constructed,” TxDOT representative Joshua Geyer said during a public virtual meeting in February. TxDOT is considering doing the same thing from Edmund Way to FM 3436. Under the plan, FM 646 would become a four-lane road with two lanes in each direction divided by a 16-foot-wide raised median. This would align with the existing four lanes of FM 646 from I-45 to Edmund Way, Geyer said. Additionally, TxDOT is proposing to create an overpass for trac at the railroad that intersects with FM 646 just east of Hwy. 3. Trac must stop to allow trains to pass, but the overpass would allow both trains and trac to travel without stopping, he said. The proposed overpass would displace nine buildings: one sin- gle-family home, seven commercial facilities and one place of worship. TxDOT would work with the owners of displaced properties, Geyer said. Geyer said widening the road will ease trac congestion. “The improvements are needed because current and projected growth in the area has caused trac

As part of the widening project, Texas Department of Transportation proposes elevating FM 646 where it intersects a railroad just east of Hwy. 3. PROPOSED ROAD DESIGN

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Calder Road widening Calder Road will be widened by 8 feet on the east side from FM 517 to 300 feet north of FM 517 to provide two southbound lanes approaching the FM 517 intersection. Timeline: spring 2022-TBD Cost: $288,000 Funding source: League City

Proposed stormwater retention pond

Frontage road

Frontage road

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

PROJECT LIMITS

demand to increase, and therefore congestion has increased along the corridor,” he said. Additionally, the widening would make the road safer. From 2015 to 2021, there were several crashes along FM 646 between Edmund Way and FM 3436, and a few of them were fatal, Geyer said. “One of the goals of the project is to reduce crashes along the corri- dor,” Geyer said during the meeting. “Crash rates within the project limits are signicantly higher than the statewide average, and ve fatalities have occurred during the six-year study time frame.” The project would total $56 million from state and federal funds. About $34 million would be for the seg- ment from Edmund Way to FM 1266, and another $22 million would be for the segment from FM 1266 to FM 3436, Geyer said. If approved, construction would

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 7. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT BAYNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. About 1,800 feet of Turner Street from Hobbs to Butler roads and about 4,300 feet of Butler from Turner to about 400 feet south of Sedona Drive will be reconstructed with concrete curbs and gutters. Timeline: fall 2022-TBD Cost: $7.31 million Funding source: League City Turner Street and Butler Road Phase 2 reconstruction

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Over 20 years of Dedication. Integrity. Passion. Service. Consistency. Whether you are buying or selling, we look forward to assisting you with every step of the process. begin in late 2022 and take 1 1/2 to two years for the rst segment and another 1 1/2 to two years for the second, Geyer said. According to the TxDOT website, next steps are to nalize environ- mental studies for the project, receive approval for additional envi- ronmental studies, and nalize the design of right of way acquisition.

Kimberly Harding, Broker/Owner 281-554-7653 Kimberly@KimberlyHarding.com

2490 Calder Dr, League City, TX 77573 | www.TheKimberlyHardingGroup.com

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BAY AREA EDITION • MARCH 2022

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

ELECTIONRESULTS

News from the 2022 primary elections

ELECTION RUNDOWN U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT 14 DEMOCRAT

Primary elections result inwinners Primary elections occurred March 1. Some races had clear winners, but others will move to runo elections. Democrat incumbent Adrian Council member, won 52.7% of the votes for Galveston County treasurer against incumbent Kevin C. Walsh, who garnered 26.1%, and Janet Homan, who won 21.2%. Democratic incumbent Lina BY JAKE MAGEE

There were several races across the Bay Area on March 1.

Headed to runo R

Won

Incumbent

SOURCES: HARRIS COUNTY, GALVESTON COUNTY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

GALVESTON COUNTY COMMISSION ER, PRECINCT 4 REPUBLICAN

67.6% Ken Clark

49.8% Eugene Howard

Garcia won his race for Harris County Precinct 2 commissioner with 75.6% votes. Challengers George Risner and Gary Harrison won 13.5% and 10.9% of the votes, respectively. Jack Morman received the most votes in the Republican Precinct 2 commissioner primary with 40.5% of votes cast. He will face Jerry Mouton, who won 22.4% of votes cast, in a runo election May 24. Other can- didates John Manlove, Richard Vega and Daniel N. Jason won 17.1%, 14.7% and 5.3% of the votes, respectively. Garcia was elected in 2018, beating Morman in the general election. Republican incumbent Ken Clark beat out challenger Matt Robinson for Galveston County Precinct 4 commis- sioner. Clark won 67.6% of the total, and Robinson garnered 32.4%. Hank Dugie, a League City City

Hidalgo won her primary race for Harris County judge against ve challengers, gathering 70.3% of the votes. She will face either Alexandra del Moral Mealer or Vidal Martinez, who will go to a runo after winning 29.5% and 25.9% of votes, respec- tively, in the Republican primary. For U.S. House District 14, Repub- lican incumbent Randy Weber won 89.3% of the votes. Weber will face Mikal Williams, who narrowly won the Democrat primary with 50.2% of the votes against challenger Eugene Howard. For state Senate District 11, Repub- lican Mayes Middleton won 62.8% of the votes against Bob Mitchell, Robin Armstrong and Bianca Gracia, who won 15.4%, 14.4% and 7.4% of the votes, respectively.

32.4% Matt Robinson

50.2% Mikal Williams

U.S. REPRESENTATIVE, DISTRICT 14 REPUBLICAN

HARRIS COUNTY COMMISSIONER, PRECINCT 2 DEMOCRAT

X7.9% Keith Casey

13.5% George Risner

2.8% Ruben Landon Dante

10.9% Gary Harrison

89.3% Randy Weber

75.6% Adrian Garcia

TEXAS SENATE, DISTRICT 11 REPUBLICAN

HARRIS COUNTY COMMISSIONER, PRECINCT 2 REPUBLICAN

14.4% Robin Armstrong

40.5% Jack Morman 14.7% Richard Vega 5.3% Daniel N. Jason 22.4% Jerry Mouton 17.1% John Manlove

R

7.4% Bianca Gracia

62.8% Mayes Middleton

15.4% Bob Mitchell

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EDUCATIONBRIEFS

News from Clear Creek ISD & Texas

HIGHLIGHTS

District surpasses state, region for 2021 STAAR CLEAR CREEK ISD For the 2020-21 school year, Clear Creek ISD students scored higher percentages across the board against the state and the rest of their region for the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness. BY SIERRA ROZEN SURPASSING THE STANDARD

Clear Creek ISD board of trustees will meet at 6 p.m. March 28 for a regular meeting and 4:30 p.m. April 11 for a workshop at the Education Support Center, 2425 E. Main St., League City. Watch online at www.ccisd.net/boardmeeting. MEETINGSWE COVER districts are facing related to teacher vacancies, develop recommendations for regulatory or other policy changes for TEA and provide feedback on TEA initiatives designed to help impact vacancies. TEXAS The Texas Education Agency on March 10 announced the creation of a teacher vacancy task force that will bring together superintendents, teachers, human resource officers and other stakeholders from districts across the state. School districts have struggled to fill vacancies and retain teachers, and a study conducted by the Charles Butt Foundation found that 68% of teachers surveyed considered leaving the profession in 2021 compared to 58% in 2020. Some primary goals of the task force will be to understand the challenges

Clear Creek ISD students scored higher percentages across the board against the state and the rest of their region for the The State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness test. Percent of students who passed the STAAR test in 2021

The data was presented at the Feb. 28 CCISD board of trustees meeting. Since the 2020 STAAR test was can- celed due to COVID-19, the data is only reported for the 2019 and 2021 administered tests. STAAR performances are broken up into three different performance rates: Approaches Grade Level or above, Meets Grade Level or above and Masters Grade Level. For CCISD, 78% of students across all grade levels and subjects were given the rating of Approaches Grade Level or above. Of the 78%, 53% received the rating of Meets Grade Level or above, and 26% of the students in the original 78% received the rating of Masters Grade Level. “You’ll see in the data compared to the state and region, and you’ll see again that we are above the state and the region in those,” said Sheridan Henley, executive director of assessment and evaluation for CCISD. Comparatively, 67% of students statewide received the rating of Approaches Grade Level or above, while the rest of the region that CCISD is a part of had 68% of students meet that rating. This trend of performing above the state and region continued for the ratings of Meets Grade Level or above

CCISD

Region 4

State

100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

78%

68%67%

53%

43%

41%

26%

20% 18%

Approaches

Meets

Masters

SOURCES: CLEAR CREEK ISD/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from League City & Seabrook

QUOTEOFNOTE “AS YOU CAN SEE, THE NEXT FEW YEARS IN SEABROOK ARE GOING TOBE PRETTY EXCITING.” THOM KOLUPSKI, SEABROOK MAYOR, ON THE NUMBER TOKNOW recently built or are in progress. 696 new Seabrook residences have either been CITY HIGHLIGHTS LEAGUE CITY The city in February unveiled Phase 1 of the parks and recreation department’s plan to name and provide signs to the city’s hike-and-bike trails with two dozen signs located at trails at and around Lynn Gripon Park at Countryside and Rustic Oaks Park. The signs include wayfinding and mileage details along with information on birdwatching and park amenities. Phases 2 and 3 will be designed this year and installed by early 2023 and include trails renamed after coastal creatures and Texas plants and wildflowers. MANY DEVELOPMENTS OCCURRING IN THE CITY League City City Council will meet at 6 p.m. April 12 at League City Council Chambers, 200 W. Walker St., League City. Meetings are streamed at www.facebook.com/ leaguecitytexas. MEETINGSWE COVER Sarah Greer Osborne, director of communications and media relations for League City, said renaming city trails makes them catchier while also promoting what makes League City special, such as its birding community.

League City to allowalcohol consumption at parks

ALCOHOL ORDINANCE The new alcohol ordinance would not apply to these parks.

BY JAKE MAGEE

LEAGUE CITY Pending a second reading, residents will soon be able to consume alcohol at most city parks. League City City Council Member Hank Dugie brought before the council the suggestion to change the city’s ordi- nances to allow the sale and consumption of alcohol in all city parks. Today, such activity is allowed only during events that receive a city permit. Fundamentally, citizens should not have to ask their government for permission to drink a beer or wine at a park, Dugie said, adding that Galveston County parks do not have such restrictions. Council Member Larry Millican, who was against the ordinance change, said alcohol consumption is already allowed at parks so long as a permit is granted. He expressed the concern that with the proposed ordinance, alcohol consumption would be allowed at all parks, even ones built specifically for youth activities. Dugie pointed out the proposed ordinance would not allow alcohol consumption at organized youth events.

DICKINSON AVE.

270

96

WALKER ST.

CHESTER L. DAVIS SPORTSPLEX

HOMETOWN HEROES PARK

3

ELVA LOBIT PARK

45

646

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Council Member Nick Long agreed there are concerns. He amended a motion to approve the ordinance to not allow residents to bring their own alcohol to Hometown Heroes Park, Lobit Park and the Chester L. Davis Sportsplex, which are three parks primarily for children. The motion passed 6-2 with Mayor Pat Hallisey and Millican against.

Seabrook looks to future in State of the City

HWY. 146WIDENING This is a five-year road project.

BY JAKE MAGEE

Hwy. 146 widening begins with a June 2024 expected completion date.

Manager Gayle Cook said. Additionally, Seabrook is working to create Seabrook Town Center just north of Repsdorph Road on the west side of Hwy. 146. The development includes 315 apartment units adja- cent to retail shops and commercial buildings that will be built around a central plaza. Finally, officials are working on a hotel planned unit development in the city. It will include a boutique hotel, an extended-stay hotel, 20,000 square feet of new waterfront restaurants and 12,000 square feet of event venue space. Compass by Margaritaville will be part of the development, Kolupski said.

FEB. 2019

SEABROOK City officials celebrated accomplishments from 2021 while looking at the years ahead during Seabrook’s first in-person State of the City address March 3. The widening and expansion of Hwy. 146 through Seabrook and Kemah broke ground in 2019 and is still on track to wrap up by spring 2024, Mayor ThomKolupski said. The widening project displaced dozens of businesses along Hwy. 146, but now 26 acres of property adjacent to the highway are available for development. Several businesses, such as Popeyes andWhataburger, are interested in opening in Seabrook, City

Contractor says project will finish in May 2023, a year early. Work slows, and estimated completion date moves back to October 2023. Seabrook officials say the completion date is spring 2024.

JAN. 2021

SEPT. 2021

MARCH 2022

SOURCES: CITY OF SEABROOK, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION/ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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13

BAY AREA EDITION • MARCH 2022

C A M P G U I D E GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

Parents looking for camps for their children have a number of options to choose from in the Bay Area. This list is not comprehensive.

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A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day NIGHT Overnight SP Sports

CLEAR LAKE 1 Bay Area Youth Singers will be having a weeklong music camp for the 17th year. Camps will be led by professional music teachers. Ages: grades 18 Dates: July 1115 Cost: $170-$365 ART DAY Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 18220 Upper Bay Drive, Nassau Bay 8324252329 www.bayareayouthsingers.org 2 Bushi Ban summer camps will include eld trips and four martial arts classes each week. Ages: 5 and up Dates: May 31Aug. 17 Cost: $209-$229 DAY SP Bushi Ban, 2465 Bay Area Blvd., Houston 2812188989 www.bushiban.com 3 Camp Clear Lake allows campers to spend their days swimming, playing, making arts and crafts, participating in sports, watching movies and playing games. Ages: 611 Dates: June 6July 1, July 1129 Cost: $160-$190 DAY SP Clear Lake City Rec Center, 16511 Dianna Lane, Houston 2814880360 www.clcca.org 4 Explorer Camps at Space Center Houston oer children ways to learn about space. Children will study how to build rocks, design space habitats and program robots. Ages: 411 Dates: May 31Aug. 12 Cost: $239.95-$350 A+ DAY Space Center Houston, 1601 NASA Parkway, Houston 2812834755 www.spacecenter.org 5 Hawk STEAM Academy summer camps are returning, hosted by the University of Houston-Clear Lake. They will oer two sep- arate camps: Software Engineering and Data Science and Intro to VR Programming. Ages: grades 68 Dates: June 711, July 1923 Cost: $300 A+ University of Houston-Clear Lake, 2700 Bay Area Blvd., Houston

6 Space Center U at Space Center Houston oers multiple STEM-based camps for two age groups. Campers will receive hands-on experience while hearing from guest speakers and astronauts . Ages: 1118 Dates: June 6Aug. 12 Cost: price depends on size of group A+ DAY Space Center Houston, 1601 NASA Parkway, Houston 2812834755 www.spacecenter.org/camps 7 St. Thomas the Apostle Episcopal School Camps campers will have multiple options to choose from, including engineer- ing, archery, coding, etiquette and music camps. There are half- and full-day options available. Ages: 412 Dates: TBA Cost: TBA DAY SP St. Thomas the Apostle Episcopal Church, 18300 Upper Bay Road, Nassau Bay 2813331340 www.stesnb.org/explore-our-school/ summer-camp 8 University of Houston-Clear Lake will host Kids U, which are several camps on dier- ent subjects for dierent ages. Campers can learn everything from character development to STEAM skills to creative writing. Ages: pre-K-grade 8 Dates: June 6July 28 Cost: $159 A+ University of Houston-Clear Lake, 2700 Bay Area Blvd., Houston 2812833529 www.uhcl.edu GALVESTON 9 Pyramid Kids Camps at Moody Gardens allow campers to learn about ani- mals and ecosystems, conduct experiments, make art and play games inspired by nature. Ages: K-grade 7 Dates: June 6Aug. 12 Cost: $275-$300 ART A+ DAY Moody Gardens, 1 Hope Blvd., Galveston 4096834325 www.moodygardens.com 10 Sea Camp campers will have the oppor- tunity to explore all things ocean related with one camp taking place in Costa Rica. Other camps include marine biology, coastal ecology, shing camp, wildlife photography and ocean career awareness.

Bushi Ban

Sea Camp

COURTESY BUSHI BAN

COURTESY SEA CAMP

Ages: 1018 Dates: June 5Aug. 6 Cost: $1,015-$2,900 A+ NIGHT Texas A&M University Galveston Campus, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston 4097404525 www.tamug.edu/seacamp 11 Sea Campus Kids is a summer camp that focuses on marine biology. Based on the week chosen, campers will learn about Gal- veston Bay’s sh habitat, inspect reefs, study veterinary medicine, and learn about sharks and stingrays. Ages: 411 Dates: June 9Aug. 10 Cost: $120-$200 A+ Texas A&M University Galveston Campus, 200 Seawolf Parkway, Galveston 4097404525 www.tamug.edu/seacamp LEAGUE CITY 12 Art, Movement & Life Skills Academy campers will make art such as mosaics, nature art and photography while working with drawing, painting and creative writing. The camp includes yoga for kids, out- door games, and critical skills for life through games and drama. Ages: 717 Dates: various days in June and July Cost: $120-$175 ART DAY Art, Movement & Life Skills Academy, 1701 S. Hwy. 3, League City 8328498934 www.amlsacademy.com/courses-registration 13 Bay Area Arts Conservatory campers will have the opportunity to par- ticipate in dierent musical summer camps, including “101 Dalmatians,” “Cinderella” and

Bay Area Arts Conservatory, 400 Hobbs Road, Ste. 202, League City 2819381444 www.baactx.com 14 Bushi Ban summer camps will include eld trips and four martial arts classes each week. Ages: 5 and up Dates: May 31Aug. 17 Cost: $169 ART DAY SP 103 Davis Road, Ste. V, League City 8326321342 www.bushiban.com 15 Camp by the Creek is a summer camp hosted by League City with dierent programs, including arts and crafts, games, eld trips and outdoor activities. Ages: 612 Dates: May 31Aug. 12 Cost: $198.75-$397.50 DAY Hometown Heroes Park, 1001 E. League City Parkway, League City 2815541180 www.leaguecity.com/parks 16 Code Ninjas oers a variety of camps that allow kids to learn how to code at a young age. Some of the camps include how to become a YouTuber; coding cartoons; and learning about video games, such as “Mine- craft” and “Roblox.” Ages: 514 Dates: May 29Aug. 18 Cost: $250-$450 A+ DAY Code Ninjas, 3725 E. League City Parkway, Ste. 140, League City 2813397482 www.codeninjas.com/tx-league-city/camps 17 Kids ‘R’ Kids Learning Academy will bring back Camp Boomerang, a summer camp that has dierent weekly themes. Some of the themes include Ultimate Games, Decade Dash, Wild Outback and

“Frozen Jr.” Ages: 618 Dates: June 619, June 27July 17, July 18Aug. 7 Cost: $465-$699 ART DAY

Mighty Origins. Ages: K-grade 5 Dates: TBA Cost: $130-$200

2812833529 www.uhcl.edu

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

2022

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & SIERRA ROZEN

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Art, Movement & Life Skills Academy

Bay Area Arts Conservatory

Camp by the Creek

Sport Divers

COURTESY ART, MOVEMENT & LIFE SKILLS ACADEMY

COURTESY BAY AREA ARTS CONSERVATORY

COURTESY CITY OF LEAGUE CITY

COURTESY SPORT DIVERS

Dates: May 30July 29 Cost: $400-$575 DAY SP Bailey Oaks Farms, 7220 CR 128, Alvin 2817567254 www.baileyoaksfarms.com 19 Game On is a weeklong evening camp that will have Bible stories, singing and other activities for kids. Ages: grades 15

Dates: June 2024 Cost: free DAY ART Gateway Community Church, 760 Clear Lake City Blvd., Webster 2812861515 www.g8waycom.org/skc22 20 Sport Divers oers weekly summer camps each year. Scuba diving skills are practiced both in a pool and in open water.

Once campers complete the course, they will receive their open-water diver certication. Ages: 1017 Dates: TBA Cost: $600 DAY SP Sport Divers, 20814 Gulf Freeway, Ste. 60, Webster 2813381611 https://sportdivers.com

A+ DAY 1092 W. League City Parkway, League City 2813381177 www.kidsrkids.com/programs/summer-camp OTHER 18 Bailey Oaks Farms campers will learn how to ride, groom, tack and care for their animals and will participate in a variety of horse-related activities. Ages: 612

512-232-5000 EdServices@austin.utexas.edu

SUMMER CAMP AT THE Y

MAKE YOUR MARK

Offering day camps around the Houston area for kids and teens and overnight adventures at YMCA Camp Cullen.

REGISTER TODAY!

E nroll anytime in UT's online high school courses to catch up or get ahead. Full-time d iploma p rogram and single courses including Advanced Placement TM subjects available.

DAY CAMP

OVERNIGHT CAMP

TEEN CAMP

For more informatio n visit highschool.utexas.edu

YMCA Mission: To put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all. Everyone is welcome.

15

BAY AREA EDITION • MARCH 2022

Voted Best Master-Planned Community!

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*The Lago Mar Crystal Lagoon operating schedule, promotional giveaway, pricing and availability is subject to change without notice. Please visit Lago Mar Information Center for full details. 02/22

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY SIERRA ROZEN

The optometrist oce oers eye exams and ttings for both glasses and contacts.

BUSINESS FEATURE

Falcon Pass Vision Center opened in the Clear Lake area in 2007.

Dr. Russell Malik (left) and Dr. Lisa Maxwell (right) met at the University of Houston.

PHOTOS BY SIERRA ROZENCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Falcon Pass Vision Center Optometrists set sights on local eye health in Clear Lake A community-centered optometrist is unusually hard to nd these days, come see us, and it was a little far to go over to the Hobby Airport area,” Maxwell said. “We were hav- ing to kind of serve the community BY SIERRA ROZEN

The vision center reopened in May 2020 after closing due to the pandemic.

up May 5, 2020, so they could continue to serve the community that was depending on them. On an average day the couple sees about 18 to 20 patients with problems ranging from medical emergencies to getting tted for contacts or glasses. They also provide pre- and post-operation services to patients receiving LASIK surgery. “We’ve just tried to make every- body as happy and comfortable as possible,” Maxwell said. Overall, the biggest thing Malik and Maxwell could stress is the importance of taking care of one’s eye health, and they iterated the need for regular eye exams. “Just because you can see doesn’t mean you don’t have things like glaucoma,” Malik said. “Contact lenses are not just a toy. Some people really abuse them. So it’s a health issue. [What’s import- ant] to me is just keeping those eyes healthy.”

Falcon Pass Vision Center 2409 Falcon Pass Drive, Ste. 180, Houston 281-461-3937 www.falconpassvision.com Hours: Mon.-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sat.-Sun. COMMONTREATABLE EYE ISSUES • Nearsightedness: Objects that are far away are blurry. • Farsightedness: Objects that are close up are blurry. • Astigmatism: One eye is curved dierently than the other. • Presbyopia: Eyes lose the ability to focus on nearby objects.

according to Dr. Lisa Maxwell, which is what led to her and her husband, Dr. Russell Malik, opening Falcon Pass Vision Center in 2007. The couple initially met in optometry school at the University of Houston. Maxwell has been practicing since 1989, and Malik has been practicing since 1991. Malik originally opened a practice near the Hobby Airport in 1992, while Maxwell worked with another partner around Scarsdale. Eventually, they realized their local clientele base was having diculty with driving all the way out to Hobby Airport, which was the catalyst for opening the one in the Clear Lake area. “We started noticing that after being in the community for a long time that people were wanting to

in our house in some ways.” Once the business opened in 2007, Maxwell was the main owner until Malik ocially joined the practice in 2019 after closing the one near the airport. The rst focus of the new business was providing sports glasses for children after they saw a lack of them at other optometrists. The community they practice in has a large sports presence; Maxwell said “everyone is very sports minded.” “I just kept having people asking for sports glasses for their children, and it just kind of oored me that nobody really had a focus on kids and recreational sports glasses,” she said. Despite the pandemic putting a small hurdle in their operations, the couple ocially opened back

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