Pearland - Friendswood Edition | May 2021

PEARLAND FRIENDSWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 6  MAY 7JUNE 10, 2021

ONLINE AT

Brazoria County Expressway sees more ridership than projected Toll road expansion likely as growth continues

HOUSTON

TRADING MONEY FOR TIME

$1.40

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$1.00

Riding the Hwy. 288 toll road from its southern limit at Croix Road into the Texas Medical Center costs $8.10 at peak hours, with the drive taking 16-24 minutes, according to a Community Impact Newspaper analysis.

$0.80

$4.20 $1.00

610

$1.00

$1.30 $2.10

Brazoria County Expressway Harris County portion Tolls leading to the TMC Remaining tolls

BY HALEY MORRISON

$1.30

When the Hwy. 288 toll road opened up in November and provided a fast lane into downtown Houston for Bra- zoria County residents, local ocials were not sure of how the COVID-19 pandemic would aect the ridership. “From what was projected and the unknowns of COVID-19, we have been pleasantly surprised by the ridership on the toll road,” Brazoria County Judge Matt Sebesta said.

The toll road has brought in more revenue than expected, despite rid- ership being down due to COVID-19. However, the increase in revenue does not necessarily mean the road, which cost Brazoria County $80 mil- lion, will be paid o early. The county plans on eventually expanding the Brazoria County Expressway 10 miles south of its limit at Croix Road as the

$1.80 is the cost to ride the Brazoria County portion of the toll road. 2050 is the latest year to pay o the Brazoria County portion of the toll road. $1.56M is the total revenue the toll road has brought in since late November, as of April 9.

$1.30 $1.30

$1.30

288

$0.50

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SOURCE: BLUERIDGE TRANSPORTATION GROUP, TXDOT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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Friendswood among cities to consider funding regional drainage solutions Billion-dollar proposal

Consultant Freese and Nichols has presented over $1.6 billion worth of potential regional ood projects in the Lower Clear Creek and Dickinson Bayou watersheds. Dickinson Bayou detention: $220M Potential projects

Clear Creek and Dickinson Bayou watersheds. As communities fund local drainage projects—such as those being covered by League City’s $73 million drainage bond—and potentially part of the $32 billion coastal barrier posed for construction near Galves- ton, local municipalities will have to consider how to aord the massive costs of regional ooding xes. “We always knew this was going to be a lot of hard work followed by another order of magnitude of harder work,” said Chuck Wolf, an associate with Freese and Nichols. “The funding side of this is a big challenge.”

BY JAKE MAGEE

Clear Creek conveyance improvements: $275M Dickinson Bayou bypass channel: $280M FM 2351 or I-45 tunnel: $875M-$975M

Total: $1.6B- $1.7B

A consultant has presented over $1.6 billion worth of potential regional ood solutions for Friendswood, Pearland and beyond. Consulting rm Freese and Nichols came up with the proposed projects after a year of research of the

CONTINUED ON 18

SOURCE: FREESE AND NICHOLSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Friendswood, League City swap land

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: Hwy. 288 ocially opened much later than expected and during a global pandemic, but it’s exceeded revenue forecasts in less than six months of its grand opening. Our front-page story this month digs into the tollway’s performance and how it compares to other local toll roads. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

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FROM JAKE: Ocials are wrapping up their study of two local watersheds, and proposed projects total over $1.6 billion. With local and regional drainage projects also happening in southeast Houston communities, the next big hurdle is funding. See our front-page story for details. Jake Magee, EDITOR

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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NOWOPEN 1 The Box Bakery and Kitchen opened at 1130 Broadway St., Ste. 114, Pearland, on March 27. The business offers made- from-scratch sandwiches; tacos; and desserts, including cupcakes, cookies, cakes and macarons. 281-947-8137. www.theboxbak.com 2 Grit Realty had its grand opening April 8. The business offers real estate services for commercial and residential properties as well as investment prop- erties. The business can also help clients who are buying land to develop. The business is owned by Sasha Costa and is located at 2510 Westminister, Pearland. Realtors Sherry Stockwell and Annette Kaltwasser are partners. 833-438-4748. www.gritrealty.com 3 SRE Shaw Real Estate opened at 3272 E. Broadway St., Pearland, on April 12. The business specializes in brokerage, in- vestments, and commercial and residen- tial real estate. 281-546-9237. www.shawrealestate.com

4 Flawless Skin Lounge celebrated the grand re-opening of its business March 25. The business, which has oper- ated in Friendswood for 3 1/2 years, has relocated to 313 S. Friendswood Drive, Ste. 105, Friendswood. It was originally located at 607 S. Friendswood Drive, Ste. 19, Friendswood. The business offers facials, chemical peels, cool slimming and 5 USA Ninja Challenge opened with classes at 309 Ibis St., Webster, on May 1. The business allows children ages 4-17 to play and train in a gym full of swinging ropes, monkey bars, climbing walls, rope walls and other equipment designed to make participants feel like a ninja. The business offers classes for children and teenagers that teach fitness, agility and life skills. USA Ninja Challenge also hosts various camps and parties for birthdays, fundraisers, graduations and microblading. 832-569-4238. www.flawlessskinlounge.com

6 UOffice Executive Suites opened a location at 711 Bay Area Blvd., Web- ster, in February. The business provides coworking spaces to its clients along with free Wi-Fi, 24/7 building access, coffee and tea, mail services, printers, and more. UOffice has also taken precau- tions to make its locations safer during the COVID-19 pandemic. 832-932-5165. www.uofficesuites.com 7 California-based space company Venus Aerospace is relocating its office and operations to Houston and is leasing an office at Ellington Airport, home of the Houston Spaceport, 11602 Aerospace Ave., Houston. Venus is developing a “spaceplane” that is capable of using rocket engines to travel 12 times faster than the speed of sound at an altitude of 150,000 feet. The company is in talks with city leaders to build its permanent headquarters and testing facility on spaceport grounds. www.venusaero.com COMING SOON 8 Dignity Memorial broke ground on

the Forest Park South Funeral Home, which is a new funeral home in Pearland. The funeral home is expected to open in July at 12560 Shadow Creek Parkway, Pearland. Forest Park South will serve people of all faiths and cultures, accord- ing to a press release. www.dignitymemorial.com 9 Action Behavior Centers , an Aus- tin-based therapy center for autism, is opening a center in Pearland in July. Action Behavior Centers aims to help children with autism live productive and happy lives. The center will be located at 2941 Broadway Bend, Pearland. www.actionbehavior.com 10 Angelica and Geovani Barcenas are hoping to open Nikki’s Country Kitchen in mid-May. The business will be located at 5010 Broadway St., Pearland, where the Allendale’s was located. Nikki’s will serve traditional county food. The Barcenases own Barcenas Bar & Grill 2 off Almeda Genoa Road in Houston. 713-987-1900. www.barcenasmexicanrestaurant.com

more. 346-336-4652. www.ninjawebster.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & HALEY MORRISON

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Top Dog Grooming

COURTESY FRIENDSWOOD PET SPA

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Gathering Outreach Community Services opened May 1 at Pearland Town Center.

COURTESY GATHERING OUTREACH COMMUNITY SERVICES

FEATURED IMPACT NOWOPEN Gathering Outreach Community Services held its grand opening May 1 at Pearland Town Center. The nonprot gave COVID-19 gift baskets to families at its grand opening. Located at 11200 Broadway St., Ste. 630, Pearland, the nonprot organization oers youth development and career- readiness workshops to lower-income students in an eort to equalize educational opportunities. Gathering Outreach Community Services also oers a scholarship program for May. Located at 2518 Westminister Road, Pearland, the business specializes in diagnostic hearing testing, tinnitus, eval- uations, ear wax removal, digital hearing aid technology and repairs, and custom ear products. Custom ear products can include earplugs for hunters, swim plugs and musician monitors. The owner of the business, Dr. Chris Araj, is the past presi- dent of the Texas Academy of Audiology. 281-317-4010.

students. The nonprot will also oer small groups focused on mental health and anxiety for adults. For more information, call 281-721-2126. www.gatheringoutreach.org

USA Ninja Challenge COURTESY USA NINJA CHALLENGE

The Charleston Tea Room and Cafe

HALEY MORRISON/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

11 In early April, the city of Pearland closed the dog park in Independence Park for reconstruction. The city hopes to reopen the park at the beginning of the summer. Upgrades to the park include a new sidewalk and fencing. Independence Park is located at 3449 Pearland Parkway, Pearland. 281-412-8900. www.pearlandtx.gov RELOCATIONS 12 Friendswood Pet Spa has changed its name to Top Dog Grooming and relocated to 208 S. Friendswood Drive, Ste. A, Friendswood in mid-February. The business was previously located at 2407 W. Parkwood Ave., Ste. 111, Friendswood. 281-793-9129.

www.facebook.com/friendswoodpetspa NEWOWNERSHIP 13 The Charleston Tea Room and Cafe at 154 S. Friendswood Drive, Friend- swood, reopened April 12. Patty Rodri- guez is the new owner of the business as the original owner, Carolyn Zimmer, retired. The restaurant was renovated as well. The menu has remained the same, with the BLT and fiesta salad being new. 281-992-8327. www.facebook.com/ charlestontearoom ANNIVERSARIES 14 Pearland Hearing Aids & Audiology is celebrating five years in Pearland this

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www.pearlandhearingaids.com 15 Epic Plumbing is celebrating 25 years in Pearland this June. The business offers gas line repair and installation, kitchen plumbing, leak detection, repip- ing, toilet and water heater repair and installation, water softener and filtration systems and commercial plumbing. The business is located at 17302 CR 125,

Pearland. 281-815-2322. www.epicservices.com

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Pearland to submit SmithRanchRoad widening for possible federal funding At its April 12 meeting, Pearland City

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

ONGOING PROJECTS

MOVING THROUGH THE PROJECT

of Pearland, TxDOT had to reallocate some funds away from Smith Ranch to Hwy. 290 in 2019. Council voted in favor of submitting the project to the committee. Even if the city does not receive the funding for the project, it will still go forward with the project. Smith Ranch is expected to go to bid this fall, with construction beginning in January 2022. 2013: Smith Ranch Road is selected by the Houston-Galveston Area Council to receive funding through the Transportation Improvement Program. Nov. 2016: The project starts the design phase on time. November 2018: TxDOT informs the city that right-of-way maps are approved at the district level, but the city cannot purchase land until it is environmentally cleared. February 2019: Pearland receives environmental clearance. April 2019: TxDOT informs the city there is an issue with funding: Money allocated toward Smith Ranch Road has been reallocated to Hwy. 290. May 2020: The city submits the advanced funding agreement. However, the title searches for right- of-way acquisitions have expired, as the project was delayed. Summer 2020: Construction is originally supposed to start but is now o schedule. April 2021: Pearland City Council votes to submit the project to the federal government for more funding. Summer 2021: Property acquisition starts. Early 2022: Letting for the construction begins. Mid-2022: Construction begins. Summer 2023: Construction ends. SOURCE: CITY OF PEARLANDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Smith Ranch Road has been delayed, though not through the fault of the city, Deputy City Manager Trent Epperson said. The project, which was originally supposed to break ground in 2020, has run into issues with land acquisition and nancing. Here is a timeline of the project:

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Orange Circle and Linwood Oaks sub- division street reconstruction The Orange Circle and Linwood Oaks subdivision street reconstruction project is on track to nish construc- tion in May. The project includes reconstructing concrete neighborhood streets in Orange Circle and Linwood Oaks subdivision. Construction began in late 2020. Timeline: November-May Cost: $1.65 million Funding source: 2019 city of Pearland bond

Council voted to submit the Smith Ranch Road widening project to the House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations for funding. U.S. Rep. Troy Nehls, RRichmond, has let his district know each Congress member can submit up to 10 locally supported projects, according to the city of Pearland. The committee has $10 million-$15 million to fund the 10 projects, which translates to roughly $1 million-$1.5 million per project, Deputy City Manager Trent Epperson said at the meeting. Because of this, city sta recommended presenting only one project for potential funding. The project is most likely to receive funding if it is ready to start construc- tion in the next year; if it is environ- mentally cleared; and if it is already partially funded by the transportation improvement program, which allo- cates federal funding to transportation projects every four years. The Smith Ranch project meets all criteria. The project costs $8.6 million. The portion the city of Pearland is supposed to pay for has also gone up in the past few years, which is another incentive to look for other avenues of funding, Epperson said. The city does not know the timeline of receiving money from the committee. “The project was delayed through no fault of our own, and the land acquisition cost has risen dramati- cally,” he said. The project will widen Smith Ranch

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Road from a two-lane concrete road to a four-lane concrete road. The project limits are fromHughes Ranch Road to just north of Broadway Street. The project was originally an 80-20 funding split, with the city paying for 20% of the construction, Epperson said. However, as the land costs increase and the timeline gets pushed back, it looks like the city may be on the hook for 40%-50% of the funding costs, he said. If the city does not receive funding from the committee, it could potentially receive more from the Houston-Galveston Area Council, city ocials said. The project also had funding issues with the Texas Department of Trans- portation in the past as well. According to a February 2021 memo from the city

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 19. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Timeline: TBD Cost: $10.8M Funding source: 2019 city of Pearland bond Bailey Road widening The Bailey Road project is was expect- ed to go to bid in June, but has been pushed back to an unknown time. The project will widen the roadway from two to four lanes and create an above- grade railroad crossing.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT Friendswood gains League City land in swap

New

League City has agreed to give Friendswood about 29 acres of land. In exchange, League City will be given 50% of the land’s annual property tax revenue over the next 20 years.

LAND

BY JAKE MAGEE

second reading May 3, after deadline. The council approved the rst reading April 5, and League City City Council approved the itemApril 13. League City Council Member Hank Dugie said the development could do a well and septic system instead of hooking into the city’s water line but concluded the deal was a good one. “If there was [a way to get value from the property], I’d say let’s keep it and turn it into something,” he said. League City Mayor Pat Hallisey said Friendswood should pay for the land, to which Hoover said League City is getting a good deal. If the property stayed within League City’s boundaries, the city would not generate enough property tax revenue to oset the cost of servicing the area. By getting 50% of the property tax rev- enue without having to pay for utilities or infrastructure for the area, League City is making more o the deal than it would have otherwise, Hoover said. “The reality is we’re getting a lot more than what it’s going to cost to service those houses,” he said.

League City will give up nearly 30 acres of land to Friendswood in exchange for some of the property tax revenue generated by the move. The Avalon Project is a residential development taking place along the boundary of League City and Friend- swood. Due to detention ponds in the area, it is “infeasible” for League City to build infrastructure such as roads and water lines nearby, according to city documents. Additionally, it is dicult for League City emergency services to reach the area, said David Hoover, director of planning and development. Friendswood requested League City oer 29 acres of the proposed development footprint belonging to League City to Friendswood. In exchange, Friendswood will pay 50% of the annual property taxes generated from the acreage to League City for the next 20 years. Friendswood ocials declined to comment on the deal until Friend- swood City Council approved its

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Avalon development Landswap acreage Old Friendswood and League City border

THE REALITY IS WE’RE GETTINGA LOTMORE THAN WHAT IT’S GOING TO COST TO SERVICE THOSE HOUSES. DAVID HOOVER, LEAGUE CITY DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

528

NIKE LAKE CT.

LAKEWAY DR.

SOURCE: CITY OF LEAGUE CITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

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CITY&SCHOOLS

News from Pearland, Friendswood, Clear Creek ISD & Friendswood ISD

Clear Creek ISD committee recommends making facemasks optional next year

Friendswood ISDdiscusses oering only in-person learning next year

BY JAKE MAGEE

BY HALEY MORRISON

The board asked the committee to address the governor’s order, among other tasks, according to the release. The committee’s recommenda- tions were shared with the public. More than 10,000 parents, sta and students weighed in, supporting the committee’s recommendations. According to the district, 75% of respondents said face masks should be required in CCISD for the remainder of the year. About 68% of respondents agreed with the committee’s recom- mendation to eliminate the mask requirement next school year. “The committee’s recommenda- tions provide us direction to nish out the school year with current practices and begin the transition process from required face coverings to optional face coverings,” Super- intendent Eric Williams said in the release. “We are deeply appreciative of the committee’s time and eort to come to consensus on a set of recom- mendations that reect the changing dynamics of this pandemic.” Williams will work with the board to make the changes ocial.

a homebound program, he said. Lauren Ambeau and Kim Cole—the assistant superintendent of teaching and learning and the executive director of secondary teaching and learning, respectively—presented the district’s research behind bringing all students back to the classroom in the fall. One of the biggest reasons to have students back in the classroom, they said, is that the quality of teaching and learning improves. “Most content is best authentically taught in person,” Ambeau said. Being in the classroom allows teachers to catch and correct when students are not doing their lessons properly and also allows for hands-on learning, Ambeau said. No board action was taken April 12.

CLEAR CREEK ISD While face masks will remain a requirement for the rest of the 2020-21 school year, a Clear Creek ISD committee has recommended masks be optional for the 2021-22 school year. Eective June 1, CCISD will require face coverings to be worn only when 6 feet of distance cannot be main- tained, whether inside or outside. Today, face coverings are required at all times in CCISD facilities unless eating or drinking. According to an April 13 press release, the CCISD board of trustees approved the Safely Reopen CCISD Committee’s recommendation to maintain COVID-19 protocols through the end of the school year, make certain revisions to face mask requirements for scheduled summer activities, and develop procedures for a “mask-optional environment” for all CCISD facilities in the 2021-22 school year. CCISD reconvened the committee not long after Gov. Greg Abbott elim- inated the mask mandate in Texas.

Citysupportscoastal barrierdistrict forward without a virtual learning option in the fall, it will reach out to any students whose health concerns preclude them from coming back to school and work with them to nd the best option, Roher said. FISD has FRIENDSWOOD ISD At an April 12 meeting, Friendswood ISD’s board of trustees discussed the possibility of not oering virtual learning for the 2021-22 school year. The district has several reasons for recommending in-person learning only next year, including social and emotional learning and health reasons. However, things could still change before August, Superinten- dent Thad Roher said. Only 5% of students are learning virtually in FISD, so administrators said they think the district will be on board with in-person learning for the next school year. The district also cited local and Centers for Disease Control data showing less than 1% of COVID-19 cases are transmitted in schools. If the district decides to move

NUMBERS TOKNOW

5% of Friendswood ISD students are learning remotely. 1% of COVID19 cases are transmitted in schools.

SOURCE: FRIENDSWOOD ISD, CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROLCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Pearland City Council speaks out against potential elevatedHwy. 35 project

Pearland City Council meets the second and fourth Monday of each month at City Hall, 3519 Liberty Drive, Pearland. Times may vary. Meetings are streamed and available at www.pearlandtx.gov Friendswood City Council meets the rst Monday of each month at 910 S. Friendswood Drive, Friendswood. Times may vary. Pearland ISD meets the second Tuesday of every month at 5 p.m. at 1928 N. Main St., Pearland. Meetings are streamed on YouTube. Friendswood ISD meets the second Monday of every month at 5:45 p.m. at 402 Laurel Drive, Friendswood. Alvin ISD meets the second Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at 301 E. House St., Alvin. Clear Creek ISD meets the fourth Monday of every month at 6 p.m. at 1955 W. NASA Blvd., Webster. MEETINGSWE COVER

BY JAKE MAGEE

BY HALEY MORRISON

FRIENDSWOOD With little discussion April 5, Friendswood City Council voted in favor of a resolution to support House Bill 3029, which would result in the creation of a tax- ing entity to help fund the proposed $32 billion coastal barrier. The bill has not been nalized, but it would likely include a property tax cap of $0.05 per $100 valuation. That could be lowered, but it is likely the district would need to tax residents at least $0.025 per $100 valuation to aord the maintenance the project will require, Sen. Larry Taylor, RFriendswood, said.

redone the project as a nontolled highway, according to city documents. If the project is added to the Hous- ton-Galveston Area Council’s Regional Transportation Plan, TxDOT will begin planning the project.

PEARLAND Pearland City Council members unanimously voiced oppo- sition April 26 to a proposal to recon- struct Hwy. 35 as an elevated roadway through Pearland. “It’s not appropriate here,” Council Member Trent Perez said. The elevated highway was presented as an easier travel option for Alvin residents to drive into downtown Houston. It would be more useful for Alvin residents if the Texas Department of Transportation would nish the Grand Parkway extension and connect the road to I-45, Perez said. Other reasons TxDOT representatives gave for the project were population growth and an evacuation route. The elevated Hwy. 35 project was originally presented in the 1970s as a toll road. Since then, TxDOT has

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

GUIDE

Area day cares, preschools & mother’s day out programs

Busy parents looking for full-time child care, early education opportunities or just a place to drop off their child for a few hours have several options in Pearland and Day Out Guide 2021 Mother’s

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Tottenberry’s Private School

Ivy Kids Manvel

COURTESY IVY KIDS MANVEL

COURTESY TOTTENBERRY’S PRIVATE SCHOOL

8 Eagle Heights Christian Academy Ages: 6 weeks-4 years Cost: $285 (application and enrollment), $350-$790 a month 3005 Pearland Parkway, Pearland 281-485-6330 www.eagle-heights.org Eagle Heights offers a happy and loving Christ-centered environment for kids aged 6 weeks to 4 years old. The school offers a fun and engaging program that promotes healthy social interaction and active learning through play. 9 Jana Marie’s Childcare Center Ages: 18 months-5 years Cost: $160-$170 a month 6307 Broadway St., Ste. 111, Pearland 832-328-5375 www.pearland-childcare.com Jana Marie’s Childcare Center is an all-day preschool from 6 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Parents can drop off children as late as 9:30 a.m., and children can be picked up anytime. The preschool follows a daily schedule and curriculum to prepare students for kindergarten. 10 In His Steps Academy Ages: 1-5 years

week for three or 3 1/2 hours a day. The church also offers after-school care. 6 Hope Lutheran Church Ages: 18 months-5 years Cost: $75 (registration), $100-$300 (sup- plies), $220-$450 a month 1804 S. Friendswood Drive, Friendswood 281-482-7943 www.hope-lutheran.org Tiny Treasures Early Childhood Program, a ministry of Hope Lutheran Church, provides children with safe and secure learning with a low student-to-teacher ratio. Children learn music, conduct labs and spend time in the chapel daily. Class- es run two to four days a week Mondays through Thursdays. Pearland/Manvel 7 A B Sea Preschool Ages: 18 months-kindergarten Cost: $300 (registration and supplies), $300- $725 a month 2335 N. Texas Ave., Ste. B, Pearland 832-243-4602 www.abseapreschool.com A B Sea has two-, three- and five-day programs available with discounts offered for multiple siblings, military members, first responders and teachers. It provides a safe and developmentally appropriate environment with a focus on stimulating learning experiences that promote each child’s social, emotional, physical and cognitive development. The preschool’s goal is to create a nurturing environment where children feel valued and are able to flourish at their own pace. A B Sea also offers before- and after-school care.

Friendswood 1 Encompass Academics Ages: 2-5 years Cost: $300 for June and July Trinity Fellowship Church, 301 Leisure Lane, Friendswood 281-794-8908 www.encompassacademics.com Encompass Academics runs a summer mother’s day out program. On Tuesdays in June and July from 1:30-4:15 p.m., parents can drop their child off for a few hours of child care. 2 Friendswood Children’s House Ages: 15 months-8 years Cost: $100 (registration), $119-$260 (sup- plies), $60-$706 a month 304 W. Edgewood Drive, Friendswood 281-482-0240 www.friendswoodchildrenshouse.com Founded over 45 years ago, Friendswood Children’s House is a family-owned and -operated private early childhood school. The business uses the Montessori theory, which focuses on individualized educa- tion. Classes run 5 1/2 hours a day two to three days a week. 3 Friendswood Christian School Ages: 6 weeks-10 years Cost: $90-$150 (registration), $200 (sup- plies), $588 a month 2051 W. Parkwood Ave., Friendswood 281-482-4087 www.friendswoodchristianschool.com Friendswood. This list is not comprehensive. COMPILED BY JAKE MAGEE & HALEY MORRISON

Friendswood Christian School is an early child development center that strives to encourage parent-teacher partnerships and challenge students to reach their full potential. The school offers daily, extend- ed and after-school care. 4 Friendswood United Methodist Church Ages: 1-5 years Cost: $155-$225 (registration and supplies), $185-$385 a month 110 N. Friendswood Drive, Friendswood 281-482-7535 www.friendswoodmethodist.org/ministries/ children Bright Beginnings is Friendswood Methodist’s early learning program for children. The classes provide a Christian environment with curriculum intended to help children develop and establish a love for learning. Classes run two to four days a week from 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 5 Good Shepherd Episcopal School Ages: 3-4 years Cost: $275 (registration and supplies), $75- $350 a month 1207 W. Winding Way Drive, Friendswood 281-992-1357 www.gshepherd.net Children at Good Shepherd Episcopal School learn through play, circle time, stories, drama, writing, math, cooking, simple experiments and nature walks. Classes are offered three or five days a

Cost: Varies per program 2551 O’Day Road, Pearland 281-485-6808 www.inhisstepsacademy.com

In His Steps Academy offers students hands- on, faith-based learning. The curriculum is rooted in scripture, and children do various activities. The program also includes chapel.

11A Ivy Kids Manvel Ages: 6 weeks-5 years old

Here to help you navigate public services including: • LOGGING LEGISLATIVE OPINIONS • UNEMPLOYMENT CONCERNS • DRIVER LICENSES • BIRTH CERTIFICATES • AND MORE CONTACT MY OFFICE FOR ASSISTANCE.

Contact State Rep. Ed Thompson:

512-463-0707 | 281-485-6565 District29.Thompson@house.Texas.gov P.O. Box 2910, Austin, TX 78768-2910 Thank you! It’smy honor to serve your family!

@repedthompson

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Mothers DayOut Guide 2021

PEARLAND

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Montessori School of Downtown Ages: Newborn-second grade Cost: Call for prices www.montessoridowntown.com

Cost: Call for prices 4434 CR 94, Manvel 713-489-0322 www.ivykidsmanvel.com

$220-$460 a month 12005 Magnolia Parkway, Pearland 713-436-0044 www.shepherdoftheheart.org

2213 Old Alvin Road, Pearland 281-485-2845 www.shcssaints.org

St. Helen Catholic School believes learn- ing is a lifelong process to be nurtured and sustained at all ages. The Christian academic program focuses on teaching with parent and community involvement while promoting wisdom, age and grace among students. 16 Tottenberry’s Private School Ages: 6 weeks-5 years Cost: Call for prices 7302 W. Broadway St., Pearland 281-997-8333 www.tottenberrys.com Tottenberry’s Private School offers a mother’s day out program for children age 2 and older. The school has part-time options for students of all ages. The school offers instruction and curriculum all day, as well as extracurricular classes, including PE, Spanish, Bible study, art and music.

Ivy Kids Manvel is an early childhood ed- ucation center. The school follows the Ivy Prep curriculum, which is based on Howard Gardner’s multiple-intelligence theory. It offers play-based learning and activities. The school offers discounts and incentives. 11B Ivy Kids Pearland Ages: 6 weeks-5 years Cost: Call for prices 1906 Country Place Parkway, Pearland 713-433-7300 www.ivykids.com Ivy Kids Pearland offers instruction and curriculum every day, as well as lunch. The school has music and movement, yoga, sign language and Spanish pro- grams. Ivy Kids also offers a science enrichment program. The school is open from 6 a.m.-6:30 a.m. and has free regis- tration, due to COVID-19.

Little Lambs Learning Center, which is an extension of Shepherd of the Heart United Methodist Church’s education ministry, offers children play and curricu- lum to enhance their development. 14 St. Andrew’s Academy Ages: 24 months-5 years Cost: $200 (registration), $273-$546 a month 2535 E. Broadway St., Pearland 281-485-3428 www.strandrewsacademypearland.com St. Andrew’s is a curriculum-based academy offering basic learning and religious basics. The academy also offers after-school care. 15 St. Helen’s Catholic School Ages: 3-14 years Cost: $200-$330 (registration), $150-$520 (fees), $453.40-$743.70 a month

The Montessori School of Downtown is a fully accredited Montessori School and also offers summer camp programs for children in third grade and older. 12A Montessori School of Down- town-Pearland 2121 N. Grand Blvd., Pearland 281-485-3567 12B Montessori School of Down- town-Silverlake 2525 CR 90, Pearland 281-412-5763 12C Montessori School of Down- town-Shipra 11203 Shadow Creek Parkway, Pearland 832-802-8215 13 Little Lambs Learning Center Ages: 18 months-5 years Cost: $200-$275 (supplies and registration)

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE Brows’ Aroun’ Antiques Shop sells mixture of antiques, collectibles, art

FRIENDSWOODRESIDENTMIKE QUINNMAKES THE TIKI HEADS SITTINGOUTSIDE BROWS’ AROUN’ ANTIQUES. QUINN USED TO TEACH ART CLASSES, WHICH RENEE AND CRISTIEN RAY TOOK. THEY LIKED HIS ART AND BEGAN SELLING QUINN’S PIECES.

ANTIQUES SOLD Here are some of the items Brows’ Aroun’ has sold. • Vintage furniture

T he original owners of Brows’ Aroun’ Antiques wanted the business to be a cowboy antique store. When Chuck Ray purchased the store in 2017, he decided to honor that vision while adding his own style. “This was our favorite antique store,” he said. Chuck owns the store with his wife, Renee Ray, and his son Cristien Ray. Chuck and Cristien work up front, while Renee purchases the items for the store. “My wife loves to shop,” Chuck said. Many of the antiques in the store come from estate sales. The store has 18 vendors for its products. However, the store does not sell just antiques; it also sells art pieces, including the large tiki heads outside the store. The heads were made by Mike Quinn, who used to teach art classes in Friendswood. Renee and Cristien took classes from him and liked the work so much, they decided to sell it in the store. Brows’ Aroun’ also sells Quinn’s “sh with an attitude” pieces in the store, which were popular in the 1980s, Ray said. The art pieces are some of Chuck’s favorite things the business sells. One unique art item is a table made out of a church door. “You won’t nd another one like it,” he said. Brows’ Aroun’ Antiques was Sun Ray Antiques before the Rays bought it. The store is celebrating its 20-year anniversary this year. Chuck and Renee bought the store after Chuck retired from his job as an IT director. Chuck said one of the toughest parts of owning the store is learning the business side of things. Despite the pandemic, the store has remained successful through the last year. While owning a business comes with its chal- lenges, the people in Pearland are the best part of the job, Chuck said. BY HALEY MORRISON

• Kitchenware • Collectibles • Art

PHOTOS BY HALEY MORRISONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Chuck Ray owns Brows’ Aroun’ Antiques with his wife, Renee Ray, and son Cristien Ray.

The store sells one-of-a-kind pieces, including a table made out of an old church door.

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Brows’ Aroun’ Antiques 4808 W. Broadway St., Pearland 281-485-7443 www.facebook.com/browsaroun.tx Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. noon-5 p.m.

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SUFFERING FROM VARICOSE VEINS? Extra precautions are in place to ensure new & existing patients can safely receive treatment during COVID-19. IF YOU EXPERIENCE..... Varicose Veins or Bulging Veins • Poor Circulation • Leg Pain • Leg Swelling • Leg Ulcers or Sores Leg Cramps when you walk • Restless Legs • Leg Heaviness & Fatigue • Peripheral Vascular Disease... We Can Help! Non-surgical treatment is available! Covered by most insurance plans.

www.CoastalVascular.net Call 281-500-9519 to schedule an appointment

Located at 8619 W Broadway St #105, Pearland, TX 77584 Easily accessible from Beltway 8 or Highway 288

D. C. Ayar, MD

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

Renae Vania Tomczak President and CEO, Mental Health America of Greater Houston

faith community can also bring you comfort and a means of support. HOWCANEMPLOYERS SUP PORTTHEIREMPLOYEESAS COMPANIESRETURNTOWORK? We have reached the one-year anniversary of the declaration of a worldwide pandemic and seen the impact play out in terms of the mental health of our nation. Change is dicult, and just as it was dicult to transition fromwork to home, the transition back will likely require patience and an oering of grace. Providing support and under- standing is crucial—promote an open and supportive culture encouraging feedback from employees to help decrease work-related stress and enhance motivation. It’s important for leadership to share that seeking help for a mental health concern will not jeopardize their career and value to the organization. Other ideas include leaders mod- eling healthy behaviors like taking a walk at lunch and encouraging employees to use their vacation time to reduce burnout.

The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to an increase in mental health issues for residents of the Greater Houston area over the past year, according to Renae Vania Tomczak, president and CEO of Mental Health America of Greater Houston, a regional mental health education and advocacy organization. Community Impact Newspaper spoke with Vania Tomczak about the toll the year has taken on the region. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. BY DANICA LLOYD

HOWHAS THEPANDEMIC AFFECTEDTHEMENTALHEALTH OFHOUSTONIANS? We’re awaiting data for the early months of 2021, but throughout 2020 our local screening data has consis- tently demonstrated that people are struggling. We’ve seen signicant increases in depression and anxiety; alcohol and substance use; eating disorders; and youth at risk for emo- tional, attentional or behavioral di- culties. While this is troubling, what the screenings have also accomplished

than 30 minutes a day. Because the stress we feel impacts us both physically and mentally, taking care of our body is important. Spring has arrived, and it’s time to return to outdoor activities—walking and bike riding has a tremendous eect on our wellbeing. Connection is so very important as we are social beings. Create your own support network by making a list of friends and family who bring happi- ness to your life, and reach out when you’re feeling low. Engaging with your

is identifying a help-seeking popula- tion earlier than ever before, giving us new opportunities to address mental health concerns long before they become a Stage 4 crises. WHATARE SOME EXAM PLESOFHEALTHYCOPING MECHANISMS? Healthy ways to cope with stress include taking a break fromwatching, reading or listening to news stories. Early on in the pandemic I learned I need to limit my intake ... to no more

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • MAY 2021

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