Franklin - Brentwood Edition - February 2021

FRANKLIN BRENTWOOD EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 12  FEB. 15MARCH 15, 2021

ONLINE AT

Plans would demolish 1970s mall, add to historic square Franklin eyes new CityHall building

CITY HALL THROUGH THE YEARS The city of Franklin has begun work to create a master plan for a new City Hall, which would replace the current building, a refurbished mall.

1930s

Franklin’s former City Hall, built in the 1930s, was located on West Main Street and Sixth Avenue.

IMPACTS

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CAMP GUIDE 2021 LOCAL CAMPS

BY WENDY STURGES

Since the 1980s, the city of Franklin has conducted day-to-day business at City Hall, located downtown on Third Avenue in the Public Square. Long- time Franklin residents who have fre- quented the building might recognize its wide hallways, spread-out depart- ments and lack of external windows. However,newer residentsmaybesur- prised to know that building was never meant to be a city hall at all, according to city ocials. Before it hosted Frank- lin Board of Mayor and Aldermenmeet- ings and public hearings, the space was home to the Harpeth Mall, a block- sized shopping center with department stores and shops. This year, the city of Franklin will begin work toward designing a new City Hall—one city ocials said they hope will be more functional and t better with the surrounding buildings on the square. CONTINUED ON 14

1970s The Harpeth Mall opened in the mid-1970s and closed in 1980.

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The city moved into its current space in 1981 after buying the building.

20%

Office vacancy on the rise Average vacancy rates for oce space in Cool Springs hit a 10-year high in the past year due to the coronavirus pandemic. Projections show the rates could rise even more before they stabilize.

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15%

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SOURCES: PARKS REALTY, COSTAR COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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*PROJECTED

NARROWGATE TRADING CO.

INSIDE

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FROMLACY: As we approach the one-year mark of the coronavirus pandemic in our state, it’s hard not to think back on this time last year. Many of us were working in oces, and 11 months later, many of us have not returned. One of our cover stories this month takes a look at the long-term eects remote working has had on our county’s oce real estate market. Lacy Klasel, PUBLISHER

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CORRECTION: Volume 2, Issue 11 On Page 7, the dates for the Main Street Festival in downtown Franklin were listed as April 24-25. Those dates have since changed to July 17-18.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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MARYLAND WAY

SEVEN SPRINGS WAY

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Tru by Hilton

Condado Tacos

HERITAGE WAY

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NOWOPEN 1 Tru by Hilton opened its newest location in Cool Springs in late January at 1001 Knoll Top Lane, Franklin. The 135-room hotel includes business and tness centers as well as on-site parking. 615-814-6440. www.hilton.com 2 Nourish at Westhaven opened Jan. 21 at 1016 Westhaven Blvd., Ste. 105, Franklin. The shop oers a selection of specialty smoothies, coee drinks and teas with various toppings, such as sprin- kles, cookies and cereal. 615-651-1343. www.facebook.com/nourishatwesthaven 3 IMAGE Studios opened in November at 102 Lumber Drive, Ste. 600, Franklin. The business oers studio space for independent salon owners. Single- and double-space options are available. 615-538-8389. www.isfranklin.com 4 Valentine House opened in early January at 1012 Westhaven Blvd., Franklin. The boutique, located near the intersec- tion of Front Street and Westhaven Boule- vard, oers a selection of home decor and gifts, including candles, lamps, furniture and other accessories. 615-939-9773. www.valentine-house.com 5 Owner and chef Nina Singto opened Thai Esane on Feb. 8 at 203 Franklin Road, Ste. 100, Brentwood. The Thai eatery, which also operates a location in Nashville, oers a number of signature dishes, including specialties, such as larb chicken wrap, Bangkok wings and Malay- sian noodles. www.thaiesane.com 6 Doctor Drives launched in Williamson County in January. The business, which is based at 231 Public Square, Ste. 300,

Franklin, provides transportation services for patients to and from medical appoint- ments and procedures for a at rate fee. Services are by appointment only. 877-604-0881. www.doctordrives.com 7 Main Point Detailing held a grand opening Jan. 16 at 1714 W. Main St., Franklin. The business specializes in car detailing, wax and ceramic coatings, and other automotive cosmetic services. 949-325-4510. https://main-point- detailing.business.site 8 Fit One Five opened in January at 318 Seaboard Lane, Ste. 303, Franklin. The tness studio oers personal training, group classes and nutritional counseling in addition to a custom app that allows members to work out from home. 615-869-8656. www.tonevetn.com COMING SOON 9 Ohio-based taco chain Condado Tacos will open its second Greater Nash- ville location later this year at McEwen Northside in Cool Springs. The restaurant oers tacos and bowls with a variety of toppings, including vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options as well as its signa- ture Queso Blanco. Condado also features a full bar with hand-crafted margaritas and a patio. The restaurant is slated to open in the third quarter of 2021, accord- ing to a release from developer Boyle. www.condadotacos.com 10 OVME is slated to open March 1 at 1556 W. McEwen Drive, Ste. 112, Frank- lin. The medical boutique oers Botox, facial llers, laser hair removal and other aesthetic health services. 615-814-6863. www.ovme.com/locations/franklin

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

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Blue Cardinal

Franklin Pride

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY FRANKLIN PRIDE

RELOCATIONS 11 Laurel & Leaf relocated from the Bellevue area at 8080A Hwy. 100, Nashville, to 1143 Columbia Ave., Ste. C10, Franklin, in early January. The oral design studio oers custom ower arrangements for individuals as well as events and oers delivery in Franklin and surrounding communities. 615-457-3425. www.laurelandleaf.com EXPANSION 12 ICON Clinical Research , located at 320 Seven Springs Way, Ste. 500, Brent- wood, announced Jan. 19 it will expand its research operations to include more facility space and sta. According to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, ICON is ex- pected to add 85 new jobs over the next 13 The Brentwood Police Department celebrated 50 years Feb. 1, according to an announcement from the city. Over the years, the department has grown from one employee to 67 sworn ocers as of 2021. The department will celebrate this year with a commemorative badge and the opening of a new police headquarters on Heritage Way this spring. www.brentwoodtn.gov 14 Hop House Tennessee Taps cele- brated its rst anniversary Feb. 1. The pub, located at 117 Fifth Ave. N., Ste. B, Franklin, oers a selection of craft beers and wine and a food menu, including charcuterie boards, tapas, sandwiches and salads. 615-454-8592. www.hophousetntaps.com ve years. www.iconplc.com ANNIVERSARIES

NAME CHANGE 15 Franklin Family Pharmacy announced in January it has rebranded and changed its name to Live Well Franklin . The store, located at 400 Downs Blvd., Ste. 150, Franklin, oers natural health products, including supplements; however, it is no longer a pharmacy. 615-472-8855. www.facebook.com/livewellfranklin 16 Fresh Farm Vintage, located at 1911 Columbia Ave., Franklin, announced in November it has rebranded to become The Blue Cardinal . The boutique oers home decor, furniture, gifts and accessories. 615-516-7055. www.thebluecardinal.com 17 Cool Springs business Milk & Honey Facial and Wax Parlor has rebranded as Bloom & Branch Organic Spa eective Feb. 1. According to owners Lisa and Paul Shearer, the spa, located at 330 Mayeld Drive, Ste. D2, Franklin, oers facials, peels, waxing, eyebrow and eyelash tint- ing, and lash lifts. 615-640-0929. https://bloomandbranch.com 18 Dr. Sean Abrams announced a new name in November for his practice, Downtown Franklin Family Dentistry , located at 216 Third Ave. N., Franklin. The practice had previously been operated by Dr. Graham Burcham. The dental oce oers dental cleaning, dentures, implants, teeth whitening and veneers. 615-595-6111. www.downtownfranklin

Red Pony will be closed until further notice while building repairs are completed.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Pride announced Feb. 2 it will hold its inaugural pride event July 31 at The Park at Harlinsdale Farm at 239 Franklin Road, Franklin. The event, to be held from 1-6 p.m., will feature a craft fair, food trucks, youth activity tent, live entertain- ment, and nonprot and vendor booths, according to an announcement from event organizers. https://franklinpridetn.com In January, local Black business owners announced they have formed the Black Business Coalition , a group within local chamber Williamson Inc., to help business owners network and grow their business- es. The group aims to recruit members FEATURED IMPACT TEMPORARY CLOSING Downtown Franklin eatery Red Pony will temporarily close following a re Jan. 23 that caused damage to the building, according to the city of Franklin. The restaurant is expected to reopen, although a timeline has not been announced. A fundraiser has been set up to support Red Pony sta members, and customers can buy gift cards online and support its sister restaurants, Cork and Cow and 55 South, which are also located in downtown Franklin. 615-595-7669. www.redponyrestaurant.com

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from the more than 70 Black-owned businesses in Williamson County. www.williamsonchamber.com/ blackbusinessdirectory CLOSING 20 Peking Palace & Sushi Bar announced Jan. 12 it has permanently closed its location at 1709 Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1035, Franklin. The eatery cited declines in business due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a social media announcement. www.facebook.com/ pekingsushibar

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

ONGOING PROJECTS

Lane is ongoing as the city works to create a three-lane roadway with side- walks on both sides. The project will also relocate existing utilities underground. According to City Administrator Eric Stuckey, the city has included an incen- tive for early completion in its construc- tion contract. Timeline: summer 2020-winter 2021 Cost: $12.7 million Funding source: city of Franklin 3 Mack C. Hatcher Parkway extension Construction continues on Phase 1 of the extension of the roadway from Hillsboro Road to Del Rio Pike. The project will create a two-lane roadway with a bridge over the Harpeth River, and there are plans to add additional lanes in a future Phase 2 of the project. Crews with the Tennessee Department of Transportation are moving to finalize work on a bridge over the Harpeth River, according to a January update from the city of Franklin. The project is slated to be complete late this year. Timelines and costs for the sec- ond phase have not been determined. Timeline: 2019-2021 (Phase I only) Cost: $45.1 million Funding sources: TDOT, city of Franklin

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WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

1 Hwy. 96 West multiuse trail Drivers will notice barriers along Hwy. 96 West as the city of Franklin continues work on a new 1.6-mile multiuse trail on the westbound side of the roadway. The new trail, expected to be 10-12 feet in width, will extend from Vera Valley Drive to Fifth Avenue North in downtown Franklin. The project is slated to be com- plete by the end of the year. Timeline: summer 2020-winter 2021 Cost: $5.3 million Funding sources: city of Franklin, federal funding 2 Franklin Road improvements Work on improvements to Franklin Road from the Harpeth River Bridge to Hooper

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UP TO DATE AS OF FEB. 9. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT FRBNEWS@COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in Franklin, Brentwood

BY WENDY STURGES

PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGES/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SPACEBOX STORAGE Crews are working to clear land for a new location of Spacebox Storage planned for the northeast corner of Noah Drive and Mack C. Hatcher Parkway in Franklin. The climate-controlled storage company has six existing locations in Florida. An opening date for the location has not been announced. The new storage facility will join existing office and retail spaces along Noah Drive and Southeast Parkway.

THE ARLINGTON ATWESTMAIN A new residential development, The Arlington at West Main, is under construction at 725 W. Main St., Franklin, near downtown. Site plans for the development include 10 condominium units with parking and storage areas below ground level. Construction is expected to wrap up in late summer, according to D9 Development.

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AC HOTEL As part of the newest phase of Hill Center Brentwood, a new location of AC Hotel by Marriott is under construction along Maryland Way in Brentwood. The hotel, slated to open this spring, will feature 148 rooms, according to co-developers H.G. Hill Realty Company and Doradus Partners. AC Hotel has another location in downtown Nashville. Phase 2 of the development will also include new restaurants and retailers.

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Construction work is ongoing at the mixed-use development Berry Farms Town Center. New portions of the development include Two Town Center, an 82,000-square-foot office building slated to be completed later this year, as well as additional office, multifamily and retail buildings, according to property developer Boyle.

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FRANKLIN - BRENTWOOD EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

CITY& COUNTY

News fromWilliamson County, Franklin & Brentwood

Williamson County ocials aimto clarify COVID19 vaccine process WILLIAMSON COUNTY Many residents have had questions in recent weeks about coronavirus vaccinations as the Tennessee Department of Health has continued its phased rollout of the Pzer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. To help clear up misinformation and provide answers to common questions, the Williamson County Emergency Management Agency held an online forum Jan. 29. Questions are edited for length and clarity and include quotes from local ocials.

CAN RESIDENTS GO TO ANOTHER COUNTY TO GET THE VACCINE? Residents can choose to travel to another county in the state to receive the vaccine, as the TDH has autho- rized counties to vaccinate all eligible Tennesseans. However, Bleam said residents must receive their rst and second dose in the same county and location. This is because the state allocates vaccines based on where initial doses were administered, Horton said. WHY IS THE COUNTY ONLY ADMINISTERING THE VACCINE DURING CERTAINHOURS? “These hours are state-set by the department of health, so that’s what we must operate under, since we’re a state- run health department,” Horton said. Horton said the county will expand hours should the state allow it to do so. WHAT IS THE COUNTY DOING TO ENSURE NOVACCINE DOSES AREWASTED? Horton said that each day, the county is using its waitlist to ll any empty appointment slots to ensure no doses are wasted if an individual does not show up at their scheduled time. DO PEOPLE NEED TOWEAR MASKS AFTER RECEIVING THE VACCINE? Residents are advised to continue wearing masks and practicing social distancing until advised otherwise, per guidance from the TDH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

VA C C I N E P R O C E S S Williamson County has developed a process to vaccinate eligible residents.

WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER 1

Those on the waitlist will receive a message from the Tennessee Department of Health with information on scheduling an appointment. It could be several days to a few weeks before appointments are available, according to the county. Residents will travel to the Williamson County Ag Expo Center to receive their vaccine. Residents are advised to wait in their car and to wait 15 minutes after receiving the vaccine. Residents who are in phases 1A1, 1A2 or are 70 or older can register on the vaccine waitlist through the county’s website or by calling 615-595-4880.

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WHAT IF RESIDENTS HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED?WHEN WILL THEIR APPOINTMENTS BE SCHEDULED? It could take a while before residents who have already signed up for a spot on the county’s waitlist actually receive an appointment to receive the vaccine. “This process before you receive an appointment could take several weeks, and that’s important to know, depending on vaccine availability at the end of the day,” WCEMA Com- munications Director Hannah Bleam said. “This process can take some time.” HOWMANY PEOPLE ARE ON THEWAITLIST? There were an estimated 3,000- plus people on the waitlist as of late January, WCEMA Director Todd Horton said. The number of appointments scheduled correlates to the number of vaccines the county receives from the state. “The vaccine has increased its frequency of coming to Williamson

County, and so we expect that people will be moved o of that waitlist fairly quickly, although I’m not able to give you an exact estimation of how long that will take,” Horton said. WHAT SHOULD RESIDENTS DO WHOARE NOT ELIGIBLE FOR THEWAITLIST? Bleam said residents who do not qualify under the current phases of the vaccination plan can sign up to receive an alert via text or email when the state does move into their phase and age bracket. WHY ARE SOME COUNTIES FARTHER AHEAD IN VACCINATING RESIDENTS? Some counties, such as those in West Tennessee, have moved to Phase 1B and are slightly father ahead, according to data from the TDH. Horton said this is because vaccine allocation is based on pop- ulation size, which can aect phase timing depending on what portions of the population, such as health care workers, qualify for early phases.

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Residents will schedule a future appointment time to receive their second dose of the vaccine.

SOURCE: WILLIAMSON COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Parents, teachers issue call to address racism inWilliamson County Schools WILLIAMSON COUNTY SCHOOLS Following

that time, the district has not done enough to address racism and inequity in schools. More parents called for the district to create a diversity and inclusion parental advisory commit- tee to help the district select a diversity consultant. WCS teacher Kate Cotton spoke during the meet- ing about a past incident of racism she witnessed in the district and the tension it created among students. She urged the district to provide more training on how to handle the conversations that follow these incidents and to provide more support. WCS Superintendent Jason Golden said over the past year, the district has been working to listen to feedback about diversity. “I’ve also spent a lot of time talking with teachers

and a lot of time talking with students and listening to them over these issues, and I’ve gotten a lot of feedback over time,” he said. Golden said district sta has also realized the need for a more comprehensive plan and the need for professional help. WCS is currently vetting some outside groups to assist the district in developing such a plan, he said. The district is expected to receive a plan proposal in the next month or two, Golden said. “I want to emphasize to you as well as [to] our board that this focus is not just [on] one thing. It is on making sure our students are being served appropriately, and it’s going to take all of us together,” Golden said.

several months of conversations, Williamson County Schools ocials are looking to develop a comprehensive plan to address racism in schools. During the WCS board of education meeting Jan. 19, a number of community members spoke about a lack of training and resources to address racial tension at schools as well as a need for the district to address racial incidents more directly. Tizgel High, a Brentwood resident and a parent of two WCS students, called on the district to take action against underlying racism still present within schools, citing an assignment that drew national attention in 2019 in which students were asked to act as slaveholders. High said that since

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

NUMBER TOKNOW County residents who have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as of Feb. 9, according to the state health department. 10.1% This is the percent- age of Williamson In accordance with an executive order from Gov. Bill Lee, municipal meetings may be held virtually until at least Feb. 27. Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen Meets Feb. 23 and March 9 at 7 p.m. Workshop meetings are always held two hours prior. 615-791-3217. www.franklintn.gov Brentwood City Commission Meets Feb. 22 and March 8 at 7 p.m. 615-371-0060. www.brentwoodtn.gov Williamson County Schools board of education Meets Feb. 15 at 6:30 p.m. 615-472-4000. www.wcs.edu Franklin Special School District board of education Meets March 8 at 6:30 p.m. at Moore Elementary School at 1061 Lewisburg Pike, Franklin. 615-794-6624. www.fssd.org MEETINGSWE COVER

FranklinBOMA appoints formermayor John Schroer to ll at-large city seat

Brentwood extends temporary outdoor dining guidelines BRENTWOOD Extending a measure previously adopted in October, the city of Brentwood will continue to allow smaller restaurants to have temporary outdoor dining spaces, allowing for more social distancing. The Brentwood City Commission voted Jan. 25 to extend through April a resolution that allows city sta to approve outdoor dining spaces rather than having business owners formally apply through the city’s ocial process, which requires approval from the Brentwood Planning Commission. The rule technically expired Jan. 1, according to the original resolution. The commission was originally intended to extend the order only through March 31; however, the city opted to extend outdoor dining spaces through April 30 following an amendment fromMayor Rhea Little.

FRANKLIN The Franklin Board of Mayor and Aldermen will gain a new member following the appointment of former Mayor John Schroer during the board’s Jan. 25 meeting. Schroer, who served as mayor of Franklin from 2007-11, will ll the at-large seat that was vacated following the death of former Alderperson Pearl Bransford in November. Schroer left Franklin to take an appointment to the Tennes- see Department of Transportation, after which Vice Mayor Ken Moore was appointed as mayor, according to the city. Schroer is expected to serve through Oct. 26, when the city will hold its next municipal election, after which a new, citizen-elected candidate will join the board. Schroer has previously indicated that he will not seek re-election, according to Alderperson Brandy

Blanton.

While Schro-

er’s appoint- ment Jan. 25

passed 6-1, some board members criticized the process through which he was

John Schroer

selected. His name was submitted for consideration during the Jan. 12 meeting, and no other candidates were publicly discussed. Alderperson Dana McLendon, who cast the lone dissenting vote, said the city’s process for picking a candidate was awed. However, others said Schroer’s commitment not to run for re-elec- tion in October makes him a good candidate and does not prevent anyone who might wish to serve a full term in the seat from doing so. As of press time, Schroer was slated to be sworn in Feb. 9.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

2021

C A M P G U I D E

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive list of camps in the area

COMPILED BY WENDY STURGES

and full day-options are available. DAY Dates: June 7-July 30 Cost: $176-$425 (includes discounts for early registration and membership pricing) 1200 Forrest Park Drive, Nashville 615-353-9827 https://cheekwood.org Creekside Riding Camp is a horse riding camp in Franklin that features daily riding lessons and safety training. Half-day and full-day options are available. DAY Dates: May 31-July 30 Cost: $295/week (half-day), $395/week (full-day) 2359 Lewisburg Pike, Franklin 615-595-7547 www.creeksideridingstables.com Deer Run Camp is a nondenominational Christian camp that oers camp options for ages 5-12. Activities include obstacle courses, swimming, climbing, games and bible study. DAY Dates: March 15-19, May 31-July 30 Cost: $69/day (spring break), $329/week (summer) 3845 Perkins Road, Thompson’s Station 615-235-5688 https://deerrun.camp Leadership Academy Camp at Warner Park is open to children ages 6-19 and of- fers an unstructured-by-design day camp experience to allow for child-directed play and activities, such as crafts, songs and games. Extended care options are available for an additional fee. DAY Dates: June 7-Aug. 6 Cost: $295-$335/week (includes discount- ed rates for early registration) 7199 Hwy. 100, Nashville 615-856-4772 www.nashvillenaturecamp.com Owl Hill Nature Preserve oers Spring Break and summer camp options for children to explore the outdoors while learning about animals and ecosystems.

Parents looking for camps for their kids have a number of options from which to choose in the Franklin-Brentwood area, including arts, academic and overnight options. This list is not comprehensive.

A+ Academics ART Arts DAY Day NIGHT Overnight SP Sports

Act Too Players School of Music oers music intensive camps as well as day and online camps for children interested in music, theater, singing and choreography. ART DAY Dates: June 14-July 1 (Mon.-Thu.), July 12-22 (Mon.-Thu.) Cost: TBD 1113 Murfreesboro Road, Ste 119, Franklin 615-294-0667 www.acttooplayers.com ARWorkshop Franklin oers arts and crafts camps for children ages 7-14 where campers create four projects and a DIY camp T-shirt. Craft projects include canvas pillows, paint and string art, tie-dye, mac- rame, weaving and game boards. ART DAY Dates: May 24-July 26 (camps run Mon.- Thu.; excludes week of June 28) Cost: $195/week 101 International Drive, Ste. 105, Franklin 615-285-4292 www.arworkshop.com/franklin Brentwood Academy oers arts, academic, athletic and day camps for children in pre-K through 12th grade. Students can choose focuses in arts, language, robotics, science, cooking or specic sports, such as track, football and cheer. Half-day and all-day options are available. A+ ART DAY SP Dates: June 2-July 16 (camps run weekly Mon.-Thu.) Cost: $150-$300/week 219 Granny White Pike, Brentwood 615-373-0611 https://summeratba.com Camp Beech Creek is a day camp op- erated by the Currey Ingram Academy for students about to enter kindergar- ten through sixth grade. The program includes morning and afternoon half-day

options for students interested in arts, nature, science and sports. Before- and after-camp care is available for an addi- tional fee. ART DAY SP Dates: June 2-July 16 (camps run weekly Mon.-Thu.) Cost: $175-$230/week 6544 Murray Lane, Brentwood 615-507-3242 www.curreyingram.org Operated on 340 acres, Camp Mary- mount in Fairview is an overnight camp for children from kindergarten through 11th grade. Activities include water sports, science, shing, horseback riding, arts and crafts, and athletics. Camps are available in one-, two- and three-week sessions. NIGHT Dates: May 30-July 30 Camp Widjiwagan is oered through the Joe C. David Outdoor YMCA and includes a number of camp options, including day, overnight, ranch and family camps as well as Widji U, a fall study camp. Camps feature dierent themes and are open to children ages 4-17. Activities include swimming, arts and crafts, sports, archery, boat rides and horseback riding. DAY NIGHT Dates: May 26-Aug. 7 Cost: $330-$975 3088 Smith Springs Road, Antioch 615-360-2267 https://campwidji.org Cheekwood Summer Camp is open for children ages 5-15 to explore the gardens and art on the historic estate. Week themes include Eco-Discovery, Bugs and Blooms and Inspirational Artists. Half-day Cost: $575-$1,565/session 1318 Fairview Blvd, Fairview 615-799-0410 www.campmarymount.com

ARWorkshop Franklin COURTESY AR WORKSHOP FRANKLIN

Activities include arts and crafts, and each summer camp week features a dif- ferent theme, including “Flying Friends” and “Wild for Tennessee.” DAY Dates: March 15-19, June 1-Aug. 4 Cost: $280-$290 545 Beech Creek Road, Brentwood 615-370-4672 www.owlshill.org/camps Spark: An Art Studio in Brentwood oers day camp options for children ages 8-13. Campers will create daily arts projects in a small class environment, and a snack and lunch are included. ART DAY Dates: weeks of June 7, 14 and 21 and July 12, 19 and 26 Cost: $250/week 213 Franklin Road, Ste. 110, Brentwood 615-483-9847 www.sparkartbrentwood.com Whippoorwill Farm Day Camp oers camp options for children in grades 1-11. Campers will participate in age-appropri- ate activities ranging from nature walks and swimming to wall-climbing and cook- ing. Registration opens Feb. 17-18. DAY Dates: June 1-July 30 Cost: $290-$730 (four-day, one-week and two-week options available) 7840 Whippoorwill Lane, Fairview 615-799-9925 http://whippoorwill.com

ALL-SPORTS | COOKING | DRIVERS ED | DANCE | DRAMA | BASKETBALL | ROBOTICS | TENNIS | POETRY | DODGEBALL

CAMPS & PROGRAMS FOR AGES 5 TO 18 CAMP CATALOG & ONLINE REGISTRATION SUMMERATBA.COM

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY WENDY STURGES

The Merrystem’s custom arrangements are made using cool and warm color palettes.

The Merrystem owner Lauren Bourgeois opened the oral design studio in 2019 after she noticed the need for an independent orist in the area. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

TheMerrystem Franklin shop aims to bring small joys to 2021 W hile 2020 may not have been an ideal

Customers can order in advance or walk in during store hours from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The shop also has a small retail section where customers can purchase vases, chocolates, cards or beeswax candles as an add-on or gift. The shop sources owers locally and from Ecuador, which allows for a wider range of seasonal owers. As spring approaches, Bourgeois said she is excited to begin incorporating in-season blooms. “In springtime, blooming branches are my favor- ite thing to design with—so fun,” she said. Bourgeois said while she is often selective about taking on events, 2020 brought an unexpected trend

SPRING IN YOUR STEP Springtime marks a new growing season that brings with it some of The Merrystem owner Lauren Bourgeois’ favorite blooms to use in arrangements. In season:

time to start a business, The Merrystem owner Lauren Bourgeois said there has never been a greater need for a shop that helps add comfort in times of hardship. “Honestly, I think it was the perfect time to open because so many people were going through so much, and if there was anything people needed, it was to send support and beautiful things,” Bour- geois said. “Flowers are a really sweet conduit of

Tulips

Daodils

Garden roses

that encouragement. It’s just a little token, and you can do that through so many ways, but owers are just close to my heart.” Bourgeois opened the shop in downtown Franklin in October 2019. She designs custom oral arrangements, each with a unique design that can be customized using warm and cool color palettes

“FLOWERS ARE AREALLY SWEET CONDUIT OF THAT ENCOURAGEMENT. IT’S JUSTA LITTLE TOKEN, ANDYOU CAN DO THAT THROUGH SOMANY WAYS, BUT FLOWERS ARE JUST CLOSE TOMYHEART.” LAUREN BOURGEOIS, OWNER

of microweddings, small events that required only small arrangements. The shop oers free delivery in Franklin; however, Bourgeois said she is happy to help people nd independent orists if they need delivery further away. “There are so many inde-

Blooming branches

Lilacs

TheMerrystem 117 Fifth Ave. N., Franklin 615-807-2394 www.themerrystem.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., closed Sat.-Sun.

and in-season blooms. Customers can order online in advance or visit the shop at its storefront during business hours. “People are welcome to walk in and get one stem, get a ton, or they can pick up orders if they don’t want to pay for delivery or if they just want to take it themselves,” she said. “I love that, too, because then they can see exactly what they’re getting before walking away with it and really put their personality into the arrangement as well.”

pendent orists in Nashville that it’s easy for me to recommend someone that I’ve worked with before that I know will do a really great job,” she said. In the future, Bourgeois said, she hopes to add more stang to the shop to expand her business, but for now, she is happy to help people add some color and beauty to their day. “It’s been humbling in every regard and really cool meeting sweet folks and oering encourage- ment in all of this,” she said.

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

DINING FEATURE Maaoza’s Franklin Italian eatery prepares to welcome diners back L ocated near The Factory at Franklin, Maao- za’s has long been centered around family—a concept that has more than one meaning for the spot, given its Capone-themed decor. Maaoza’s was opened in Franklin in 2016 by founders Michael Dolan and Lars Kopperland, who opened the eatery’s rst location in 12 South in 2003. Both were big on family time and were fans of New York-style pizza, and so the name “Maaoza’s”—with “maa” for “family” and “za” for “pizza”—was coined. While the eatery focuses on New York pizza, which has large, thin slices, General Manager Zach Kunde, who joined Maaoza’s sta in December, said the location’s sta features multiple Chicago transplants who now call the Nashville area home. “So now, it’s just a bunch of Chicago boys running this place, which is also funny with the mob theme because Chicago is well known for its mob connec- tions,” Kunde said. Maaoza’s menu features a selection of specialty pizzas, each using house-made dough made from a secret recipe developed by the owners. “It’s a secret, homegrown dough recipe—it’s not something you can just go to the store and get,” Executive General Manager John Long said. “If you’re an Italian restaurant, your dough better be special. Nineteen years later, I think the dough speaks for itself.” Popular items include The Godfather—a pizza made with Brooklyn pepperoni, house-made “Mo” mozzarella and aged Parmesan cheese—and ravioli sticks, which are large raviolis stued with a blend of cheese and fried. “[They] have the most ‘wow’ factor when you bring them to the table,” Long said. The menu also includes pastas, salads and shareable appetizers. Maaoza’s bar features Tennessee craft beers and cocktails with local spirits, such as the Blood Orange Mule, which is made with Pickers Vodka. Diners can choose to eat on the family-friendly ground level, in the upstairs area or on any of the restaurant’s patio areas. The eatery has taken a number of steps to ensure COVID-19 precautions are in place, such as adding QR codes to menus and ensuring social distancing. Kunde said Maaoza’s has been working to make sure it is ready to welcome back regulars and newcomers whenever they feel comfortable again. “I love people, and I think this is the greatest business for that because I get to meet so many,” Kunde said. “Whether they had a good day or a bad day, kind of a boring day, whatever, … most people are very happy after you feed them pasta and pizza.” BY WENDY STURGES

THREE DISHES TO TRY 1. Ravioli sticks ($12.75) Giant raviolis are stued with a blend of cheese and fried until golden brown. 2. The Godfather ($25-$32) This specialty pizza includes house-made dough, Brooklyn pepperoni, house-made mozzarella cheese and Pecorina fausa, an aged Parmesan cheese. 3. The Tony ($12) Maaoza’s signature cheesy bread features feta, Parmesan and mozzarella cheese with a blend of mixed herbs.

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PHOTOS BY WENDY STURGESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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“WHETHERTHEYHADAGOOD DAYORABADDAY, KINDOF ABORINGDAY, WHATEVER, …MOST PEOPLE ARE VERY HAPPYAFTERYOU FEED THEMPASTAANDPIZZA.” ZACH KUNDE, GENERAL MANAGER

General Manager Zach Kunde, left, and Executive General Manager John Long have been working over the past year to ensure diner safety while providing a family-friendly atmosphere.

Maaoza’s 230 Franklin Road, Bldg. 1, Franklin 615-465-1505 www.maaozas.com/franklin Hours: Tue.-Fri. 4-10 p.m., Sat.-Sun. noon-10 p.m., closed Mon.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NONPROFIT

BY WENDY STURGES

Stacy and Bill Spencer founded the nonprot in 2004.

Artisans at Narrow Gate Trading Co. make a variety of goods by hand from high-quality leather. (Photos by Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Sister company TN Box Beams operates out of the same building in Franklin.

NarrowGate Trading Co. 200 Beasley Drive, Ste. 110, Franklin 615-212-9901 www.narrowgate.org Hours: by appointment only HANDCRAFTED GOODS Narrow Gate Trading Co. produces handmade goods from high-quality leather. The following items can be ordered through the company’s website. • Book covers • Journals • Hats • Tote bags • Coasters • Mugs • Desk and • mouse pads

NarrowGate Trading Co. Nonprot and store provides guidance, purpose to young men I n seeking to aid young men who do not walk the tradi- tional path of college or work out here in Middle Tennessee,” Bill Spencer said. “We gave them jobs at our company because they were really talented guys, and we got to be close friends.”

established in 2013 as a way to help young men develop skills and learn business practices. “We’re always looking for ways to allow guys to learn with their minds and with their hearts and with their hands—all three,” Spencer said. The Spencers have since started a company called TN Box Beams, which makes lightweight wood beams and mantles for homes. A portion of that business’s prots go to support the foundation so as not to be entirely dependent on donors. “To us, success is understanding, ‘This is who I am. This is why I was placed on this Earth,’ and stepping into that with every bit of devotion you have to oer that calling,” Spencer said.

after K-12 schooling, Bill and Stacy Spencer, founders and executive directors of Narrow Gate, created an organization that aims to instill a sense of purpose while providing job skills and training. The faith-based nonprot was founded in 2004 after the Spencers, who have backgrounds in software development, took two young men into their home with the goal of helping them to establish a relation- ship with God and to nd a fullling career or job. “It was not by some grand design or business plan. My wife and I were just minding our businesses

Since its founding, Narrow Gate has housed about 500 individuals, according to the nonprot. The foundation, which has since grown to include a lodge in Williamsport, oers training and guidance for young men ages 18-25. Spencer said the foundation works with men from all dierent backgrounds. In Franklin, the foundation operates Narrow Gate Trading Co., where members of Narrow Gate create handcrafted leather goods, including book covers, journals and bags. The trading company was

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FRANKLIN  BRENTWOOD EDITION • FEBRUARY 2021

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