Alpharetta - Milton Edition - July 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Alpharetta bans skateboarding inmost of City Center; opens pop-up skate park inmid-July

COMPILED BY KARA MCINTYRE

ONGOING PROJECTS

CHURCH ST.

Alpharetta City Council members and Mayor Jim Gilvin passed an ordinance in a 4-3 vote at the June 15 council meeting to ban the use of skateboards and longboards in most of the downtown area, in what is being called the Skateboard Restric- tion Zone. The ordinance came about initially because of complaints from residents who live in City Center about prop- erty damage, excessive noise and near-collisions between skateboarders and pedestrians as well as between skateboarders and vehicles. The Skateboard Restriction Zone covers most of the area between Haynes Bridge Road extending west past Canton and Roswell streets on the east and west sides, and stretching to Marietta and Church streets to the south and north. In the restricted zone, skateboarding and longboarding are prohibited on public sidewalks, parking decks and surface parking lots as well as elevated surfaces such as rails, ramps and steps, according to the ordinance. Individuals age 17 and older who violate the ordinance can be ned up

to $500 and receive up to 20 hours of community service. Parents or guardians of a violator under the age of 17 will be subject to the penalty; however, children age 12 and younger can use a skateboard or longboard within the restricted zone if under direct supervision from a parent, guardian or other adult. “This has not been an easy issue to deal with, but we have really tried to listen to all of our citizens and focus on the safety concerns,” Mayor Pro Tem Donald Mitchell, a sponsor of the ordinance, said. Temporary solution Skateboarders spoke during the public comment period of the rst reading of the ordinance June 1, citing a lack of a skate park as part of the reason why there is high skateboard- ing activity in the downtown area. DJ Snyder, a former longtime Alpharetta resident and skateboarder, started an online petition in late May to raise awareness on the lack of a skate park in Alpharetta, with the goal of constructing one at Wills Park. More than 1,000 people have signed it

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Bethany Road roundabouts Two roundabouts are under con- struction on Bethany Road at the intersections of Mayeld and Mid Broadwell roads, a project underway by the city of Alpharetta. Alpharetta Public Works Director Pete Sewczwicz said the completion date was pushed from May to August due to weather, utility relocations and the COVID-19 pandemic. On July 1, the intersec- tion of Mayeld and Bethany roads transitioned from a four-way stop to a functioning roundabout; however, as construction is still being completed, travel lanes will be smaller than once the project is completed. Heavy trac delays are expected on both Mayeld and Bethany roads until completion. Timeline: July 2019-August 2020 Cost: $3.23 million (total) Funding source: Transportation Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax funds

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as of press time July 14. “I grew up in Alpharetta skate- boarding the streets, and for over a decade we have tried getting a skatepark in, and nothing has ever happened,” Snyder said. Morgan Rodgers, director of recre- ation, parks and cultural services for the city of Alpharetta, worked with Snyder and other local skaters on a temporary solution to this problem: a pop-up skate park within Union Hill Park, which opened in mid-July. “It was really the expressed need from the skaters that prompted us to do this,” Rodgers said in a June 24 interview. “There hasn’t been a com- bined eort for a skate park in the past, and we are trying to remedy that.”

D B R O A

Milton rejuvenates road pavement throughout city

1 Champions Close 2 Pleasant Hollow Trail 3 Stratforde Drive 4 Coach House Lane 5 Ashepoint Circle 6 Ashepoint Lane 7 Greenpoint Drive 8 Heddingham Court 9 Hermitage Trail 10 Lochmere Court 11 Northwood Cove 12 Northwood Drive 13 Sablegreen Way 14 Sablewood Drive

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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF JULY 8. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT ALPNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Timeline: TBD Cost: $125,000 Funding source: city of Alpharetta Rucker, Charlotte roads safety addition After a vehicle crashed into the backyard of a home in the Seasons at Creekside subdivision in Alpharetta o Rucker Road during the Rucker project’s construction earlier this year, the city’s public works department worked with Seasons residents and design engineers on options for safety measures for the Seasons communi- ty. Alpharetta City Council members approved construction of a curved guardrail along the frontage of the subdivision at the June 15 council meeting.

The city of Milton completed a project to rejuvenate 14 of the city’s roads with pavement treatments, mostly on neighborhood roads within the city including Champions Close, Pleasant Hollow Trail, Northwood Drive and Sablegreen Way. The proj- ect lasted about three days and cost nearly $40,000, according to Public Works Director Robert Drewry. The process extends the life of the pavement by ve to seven years, Dre- wry said, as opposed to waiting until the asphalt needs to be completely repaved. Additionally, pavement treatments cost less than $1 per square yard, whereas completely repaving asphalt costs between $16- $20 per square yard—therefore saving the city and taxpayers thousands of dollars, Drewry said.

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ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JULY 2020

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