Alpharetta - Milton Edition - July 2020

REAL ESTATE 2020EDITION

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY KARA MCINTYRE

The most popular rooms for home staging are the dining room, living room, kitchen and master bedroom.

BEFORE

AFTER

Vacant and occupied home staging as well as interior design services are oered by Southern Yankee Staging & Design.

Ferguson said buyers are over 70%more likely to envision themselves in a home that is staged versus unstaged, and those who use home staging are 85%more likely to generate higher sales prices. (Photos courtesy Southern Yankee Staging & Design)

Southern Yankee Staging&Design Owner: ‘Staging is not a transaction; it’s a personal experience’ A my Ferguson, a 12-year Alpharetta resident and owner of Southern Yankee accounting position; however, she said this switch back to her former

VACANT VS. OCCUPIED STAGING

Owner Amy Ferguson said there are two types of home staging: vacant staging and occupied staging. Here are a few dierences between the two: VACANT STAGING • The seller, or the person selling their home, has already moved out. • The stager brings in furniture and decor, rented or otherwise. • The staging service and furniture rentals are typically paid for by the seller. • Biggest challenge: Bringing warmth to a vacant home OCCUPIED STAGING • The seller has not yet moved out of the home they are selling. • The stager can oer a consultation, which means the stager and the seller would walk through the home together and check o what needs to be done; full-service occupied staging, which includes the physical arranging of the furniture and decor in the home; or both. • The staging consultation or service is typically paid for by the Realtor or the seller. • Biggest challenge: Removing clutter, such as knickknacks, extra furniture or family photos, and depersonalizing the home

& Design in Alpharetta a year and a half ago. She oers virtual and in-person interior design services as well as staging services for Alpharetta, Milton and the Greater North Fulton area. There are two types of home stag- ing, Ferguson said: vacant staging, which means the seller of the home has already moved out, and occu- pied staging, which means the seller is still living in the home. People typically see vacant staging on television shows like “Fixer Upper” on HGTV, according to Ferguson. Contrary to popular belief, no one keeps the furniture used in vacant home staging for the most part, Ferguson said; however, she keeps some items such as rugs, pillows, throw blankets and home decor in her basement for use, but furniture is rented. She also said buyers are over 70% more likely to envision themselves in a home that is staged versus unstaged. “Home staging is more than what you see on HGTV. There’s really a science behind presenting your home in a certain way to help potential buyers envision themselves in the home,” she said. “Staging is not a transaction; it’s a personal experience.”

career reinforced the idea that accounting still did not “ll her cup.” But she knew she loved home design—she said she was always rearranging and redecorating her room as a child. “I feel like it was God-sent. I prayed about it for a long time, and I didn’t know what it looked like, but I wanted to have my own business, and I wanted it to be somewhere in design,” she said. “It was honestly this stereotypical scenario. I was in the shower and the word ‘staging’ came to me. I feel like God put it in my head and said, ‘This is what I want you to do.’” Ferguson started researching home staging, earned a nationally ranked staging certication and launched Southern Yankee Staging

Staging & Design, has not always been in this role. Prior to opening her home staging and interior design business out of her home, she worked full-time as an accoun- tant until her children went to grade school. She then stepped away from the workplace to care for her children. “At that point, I said I would never going to go back to account- ing because I was done with it. I told myself, ‘It doesn’t ll my cup anymore,’” Ferguson said. After her children started going to middle school, Ferguson said she had more free time than when they were younger. She picked “a low-hanging fruit” and started working in a virtual, part-time

“EACHHOMEANDEACHCLIENT ISDIFFERENT, ANDTHAT’S WHATMAKES THIS JOBSO REWARDINGBECAUSE I GET TOHELPPEOPLEMAKE THEIR HOME FEEL LIKEAHOME.” AMY FERGUSON, OWNER OF SOUTHERN YANKEE STAGING & DESIGN

SOURCE: SOUTHERN YANKEE STAGING & DESIGN COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Southern Yankee Staging &Design 770-500-2991

www.southernyankeedesign.com Hours: Mon.-Sat. by appointment

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ALPHARETTA  MILTON EDITION • JULY 2020

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