The Woodlands Edition | June 2020

THEWOODLANDS EDITION 2020 HEALTHCARE EDITION Seniors, caregivers confront COVID19 COVID19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has caused nursing homes, senior living facilities and caregivers to adjust their strategies this spring. INSIDE 48

ONLINE AT

VOLUME 9, ISSUE 10  JUNE 9JULY 13, 2020

WEWERE GIVEN THE GOAHEAD TOREOPENMAY 1; HOWEVER, WE HAVE BEEN TAKING PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES, AND I’VE BEEN IMPLEMENTINGA LOT OF THINGS FORMY STAFF TOPROTECT THEM.

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Seniors make up a smaller portion of confirmed COVID19 cases nationwide, statewide and locally, but they make up the majority of all deaths related to the disease.

DR. GUY LEWIS, TEXAS CENTER FOR COSMETIC DENTISTRY

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

60+

TEXAS

60+

UNITED STATES

65+ **

of cases

of deaths

of cases

of deaths

of cases

of deaths

Medical businesses adapt amid coronavirus challenges

*AS OF JUNE 2 **DATA FOR AGES 60+ NOT AVAILABLE

AGE

059 6069 7079 8089 9099 100109

CASES DEATHS

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES, MONTGOMERY COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DISTRICT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN

Like other small businesses around The Woodlands area, medical businesses such as dentists, plastic surgeons and private care practices were forced to operate at reduced capacities or close their doors in mid-March due to orders from Gov. Greg Abbott closing nonessential businesses. “We had just started to get to a pace to stay steadily busy. ... We were shut down essentially for around two months,” said Dr. James Tejada, who owns and operates WoodSprings Dentistry on Gosling Road. “We still had rent; we still had our monthly operating expenses for our software and equipment. Financially we are very blessed, but I was very concerned about my sta.” CONTINUED ON 50

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, older adults are at risk for illness caused by COVID19.

Adults’ immune systems often weaken with age, making them more vulnerable to illness and infection.

Older adults often have more comorbidities than younger people.

The density and demographics of nurs- ing homes could help spread disease.

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, CANDACE WALKLEYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

HEALTH CARE EDI T ION 2020

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

Resilient and strong for our patients and their families.

Access to Care Texas Children’s looks forward to seeing you soon, either virtually or in clinic: • Virtual visits – We are able to convert many clinic visits to virtual visits, either via phone or video. If you have an appointment, the specialty clinic will contact you directly if a virtual visit is available. • Clinic visits – If you need to come in for a visit, we have taken every precaution to keep you and our staff safe. When you arrive, you will experience a health screening and be issued a mask, be surrounded by a clean environment, and treated with care by medical staff wearing the right protective gear and following the latest safety protocols.

Texas Children’s is dedicated to providing the very best for our patients and their families. That commitment remains stronger than ever today as we confront this current challenging and ever-changing situation. As always, we are proud to offer you the same great care you know and trust – now with the safest, most convenient ways to access it. Appointments Available We are open and have availability for clinic and virtual visits. You can schedule a new appointment, reschedule an existing appointment to a sooner virtual visit and even add yourself to a wait list in MyChart. To make an appointment or reschedule, please visit texaschildrens.org/appts or contact your care team directly.

Texas Children’s wants you to know that we are here to support you, serve as a trusted resource, and most importantly, continue to provide the health care children need. Please visit texaschildrens.org/appts to schedule your new or return visit today.

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS IMPACTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

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MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Nicole Preston, npreston@communityimpact.com EDITOR Vanessa Holt REPORTERS Andrew Christman, Ben Thompson GRAPHIC DESIGNER Caitlin Whittington ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Crystal Shaer METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Matt Stephens ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company's mission is to build informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across six metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON Please join your friends and

FROMNICOLE: As our communities begin to reopen, Community Impact Newspaper strives to be a light to our readers, customers, partners and each other. Through this pandemic it has become more clear than ever that our purpose is to provide hyperlocal, relevant and useful content. We hope this encourages you to also nd inspiration as through weathering this pandemic we discover that more connects us than separates us. Nicole Preston, GENERALMANAGER

FROMVANESSA: Our annual Health Care Edition comes at a time when health is on everyone’s minds in The Woodlands area and the nation. Our coverage this month includes front-page stories that look at how senior communities are aected by the coronavirus pandemic and how private practice physicians have adapted to treat patients. We also include a guide to ambulances (see Page 41) as well as hospital listings (see Page 31). We hope the resources we provide help your family to stay safe and healthy. Vanessa Holt, EDITOR

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 11 Work continues on Robinson Road, Lake Woodlands Drive and other projects

CITY& COUNTY The latest local news

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Health Care Edition

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT 33 Local health data for The Woodlands area

Local sources 58

New businesses 4

Local hospitals 7

ERs and urgent care clinics 18

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HOSPITAL LISTINGS 37 Local hospitals in The Woodlands area

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INSIDE INFORMATION Ambulance awareness

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As the economy starts to open back up, we remain cautiously optimistic that things will go relatively well. What I think has surprised investors is how well the stock market has done since the lows of March 23rd. If you would like to know our thoughts about why stocks have rallied and what that means going forward, you can sign up for our daily email. In fact, you can go to our website and read what we have been thinking during this whole crisis. We communicate with our clients on a daily basis and have been doing so since the financial collapse in 2008. Recently we’ve added some short videos which you can also find on our website. Stay safe and we’ll keep you informed. MONTHLY COMMENTARY

For our daily commentary and all disclosures, visit www.chjwealthmanagement.com 10200 Grogan’s Mill Road, Suite 340 • 281-298-2700

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

YOUR HEALTH IS A LOT OF THINGS. THE ONE THING IT ISN’T, IS ON HOLD.

No virus can weaken our mission.

• Cleaning all our facilities to an enhanced extent • Limiting the number of visitors • Requiring masks for all patients and staff • Screening everyone entering our care sites • Enforcing social distancing inside • Requiring COVID-19 testing prior to procedures

At St. Luke’s Health, we’re resuming the scheduling of appointments and procedures. And we’re doing it safely. Our thorough approach determines which procedures can safely be performed, where, and when. These are the steps we’re taking to make it happen:

Staying on top of your health has never been more important, whether it’s an ongoing health concern, a routine checkup, or a procedure. Don’t let social distancing stop you and don’t wait until it becomes an emergency. Talk with your doctor about scheduling an appointment. For more information, visit us online at chistlukeshealth.org/here-always.

Here, always.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

MAGNOLIA

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COMPILED BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN & BEN THOMPSON

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

MAGNOLIA

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Fajita Pete’s will open on Gosling Road in the fall.

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volunteer attorneys in areas of family and civil law that CCLA’s clients face. CCLA is located at 4747 Research Forest Drive, The Woodlands. 832-598-6257. www.cclegalaid.org CLOSINGS 6 The Woodlands’ northern Salata location at College Park Plaza permanently closed for business May 11. The eatery, which was located at 3091 College Park Drive, Ste. 290, announced the closure in a May 8 Facebook post. Two locations of the Houston-based salad restaurant chain remain operational in The Woodlands: the Grogans Mill eatery on Sawdust Road and the Market Street location. Salata offers customizable salads and wraps available for individuals or catering orders. www.salata.com 7 All locations of Pier 1 Imports , including at least 13 in the Greater Houston area, will close permanently, according to a May 19 news release from the company. The closure will come after the company sells off its remaining inventory and assets. Stores are temporarily closed due to the coronavirus, but the company is preparing to go out of business “as soon as reasonably possible” after it failed to secure a buyer that would have allowed it to continue operating, Community Impact Newspaper reported. Pier 1 has locations at 615-72025 Hughes Landing Blvd., Ste. 100, The Woodlands, and 2200 Lake Woodlands Drive, Spring. 615-771-7884. www.pier1.com

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SPRINGWOODS VILLAGE PKWY. RELOCATIONS 4 Dawne Milne CPA moved in late February to 25298 FM 2978, Tomball, from 25302 FM 2978. The practice provides bookkeeping, accounting, and tax and consulting services to businesses and individuals in Spring, Magnolia, Conroe, The Woodlands and surrounding areas. The practice specializes in E. MOSSY OAKS RD. LAKE PLAZA DR. CITY PLAZA DR. 99 TOLL providing services to businesses that may not need full-time accounting staff but need the expertise. 281-305-8224. 5 Community Christian Legal Aid received a grant from the Texas Bar Foundation on May 18 for $7,000, according to a press release. Founder and President Deborah Hubbs said the legal aid organization provides free legal clinics throughout Montgomery County and is committed to offering affordable legal aid to low-income community members. The grant will be used to train www.dawncpa.com IN THE NEWS

NOWOPEN The Louisiana-based laundry service hampr announced its expansion into The Woodlands area May 15. Hampr provides laundry washing and drying services through its app, now available for iOS and Android devices. The company was founded in early 2020 to ease the laundry process for users, founder Laurel Hess said. Through hampr, area residents who register for an annual membership can schedule laundry pickup for washing, folding and delivery back to their homes. Detergent can be provided by customers or through hampr, and all services are performed by local “washrs” hired through the program. www.tryhampr.com 1 The Joint Chiropractic launched its new Indian Springs location May 13 following the clinic’s relocation from the Creekside Park Village Center. The Joint is now located at 6777 Woodlands Parkway, Ste. 308, The Woodlands, in the Indian Springs Center. The Joint Chiropractic is a national chain of chiropractic offices

offering services and treatments aimed at preventing injury and relieving pain. 281-255-2440. www.thejoint.com COMING SOON 2 Mexican restaurant chain Fajita Pete’s will be opening a location at a new retail center opening at 24345 Gosling Road, Ste. 225, Spring, this fall. Patrick Magliaro, a spokesman for Triad Real Estate Consulting Group, which is leasing the space, said in May the new location does not have a hard opening date scheduled, but he anticipates an opening between September and October. Fajita Pete’s is known for specializing in carryout and catering orders for fajitas, tacos, margaritas and more. www.fajitapetes.com 3 Millennium Physicians will open a new office in June at 129 Vision Park Blvd., Ste. 204, Shenandoah. In addition to rheumatology services, the office offers infusion and X-rays. 281-315-8130. www.millenniumphysicians.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS UPDATES

BY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER STAFF

Local business owners adapt to coronavirus restrictions

TheWoodlands Farmer’sMarket

DoseyDoe

Live performances from Texas artists will be held on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays alongside full service from the restaurant and bar. Scheduled artists include the Hill Country Band, Josh Grider, Derek Spence, Bri Bagwell, Mike Zito, and Caleb & the Home Grown Tomatoes.

basically be a rectangle with the customers on the outside and the vendors on the inside.” Cunningham said distancing markers and several hand sanitizer stands will be set up throughout the market. Face masks will also be required for visitors and vendors.

The Woodlands Farmer’s Market resumed operations May 23 at the Grogan’s Mill Village Center, 7 Switchbud Place, The Woodlands, following a more than two-month hiatus due to the coronavirus. The market’s return was part of the rst phase of its reopening plan, featuring only food vendors and farmers booths. Bruce Cunningham, a member of the Grogan’s Mill Vil- lage Association, which sponsors the weekly event, said the market will also be set up in a new arrangement with additional precautions in place. “We are going to have the vendors park their trucks next to their tents to provide separation, and all of the tents will be facing out,” Cunning- ham said. “So now the market will

Dosey Doe announced May 18 that its Big Barn venue in The Woodlands will reopen for live music, dining and drinks in early June. The Big Barn, located at 25911 I-45 N., planned to host its rst evening performance from country singer and Conroe native Tyler McCollum on June 4, after press time, following a nearly three- month closure. The venue will also be limited to 50% capacity in line with Gov. Greg Abbott’s occupancy requirements for restaurants under the state’s second economic reopen- ing phase. Dosey Doe said the Big Barn will follow guidelines from Abbott and the Texas Restaurant Association related to COVID-19.

Dosey Doe will offer live music in June. (Courtesy Eric Burns)

The Woodlands Farmer Market (Courtesy Mike Tabbert)

Dosey Doe 281-367-3774 www.doseydoe.com

The Woodlands Farmer’s Market www.grogansmill.org/fmabout

Theiss FarmsMarket

TheWoodlands-area hotels reopen

Mike Theiss, the owner of Theiss Farms, which has a market location on Rayford Road, said the demand for local honey products doubled in mid-March with some customers purchasing 8-10 quarts at a time. “Since we opened and right about the time that [the pandemic] broke loose, there was a huge surge in the demand for honey, just because of its natural antibiotic property and people were looking for natural ways to help boost their immune system,” Theiss said. “Our honey sales have probably doubled over previous years.” Theiss added the recent com- pletion of construction on Rayford Road may have also contributed to new clientele coming to the market.

In mid-May the market was out of stock, but it was expected to be restocked again by late May, he said. “The honey ow always starts coming in around the very end of May,” Theiss said.

unavailable. Hand sanitizer will be available at many entrances and contact areas, according to a news release. Embassy Suites said in a news release its innity pool will be open with social distancing guidelines, and the 3,000-square-foot Lake Wood- lands Ballroomwill be available to book and divide into smaller break- out rooms for meetings and events.

Nearly two months after closing amid coronavirus shutdown orders, large hotels in The Woodlands began to reopen in May and June. The Woodlands Resort, located at 2301 N. Millbend Drive, The Woodlands, reopened May 20, and Embassy Suites by Hilton at Hughes Landing, located at 1855 Hughes Landing Blvd., The Woodlands, reopened June 1. At The Woodlands Resort, man- agement said the facility will follow Gov. Greg Abbott’s requirements for social distancing, enhanced cleaning and sanitation. Among other changes, valet parking is suspended temporarily, and access to the tness center and several other amenities are

Theiss Farms Market provides local honey. (Andy Li/Community Impact Newspaper)

Theiss Farms Market 2008 Rayford Road, Spring 281-726-3065 www.theissfarmsmarket.com

The Woodlands Resort reopened in May. (Courtesy The Woodlands Resort)

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

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All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

COMPILED BY VANESSA HOLT & BEN THOMPSON

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Work on Robinson Road began in April. BEN THOMPSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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ONGOING PROJECT Robinson Road improvements at I-45 Work began in April on a project to improve I-45 frontage road access at Woodlands Parkway and Robinson Road and to widen Robinson at Patsy Lane and Westwood Road. The widen- ing work extends from about 350 feet west of Patsy and Westwood to 550 feet east of that intersection. Construction work slated includes signalizing the Woodlands Parkway- Robinson overpass at I-45 and aligning lanes on the interchange between the frontage roads. The project is expected to take 12 months to complete, according to Precinct 3 ocials. The contractor had almost completed drainage and pavement widening east of Patsy in mid-May, and that segment of the road opened to thru trac in late May. The next portion of the project will add trac signals and work on I-45 access, according to Montgomery County Precinct 3. Joe Sherwin, public works director for Oak Ridge North, said at a May 11 City Council meeting the temporary closure of Robinson east of Patsy had been extended by about nine days due to wet soil in the work zone. Sherwin said the contractor’s focus will next shift to the overpass signalization. Timeline: March-March 2021 Cost: $2.4 million Funding source: Montgomery County Precinct 3 ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MAY 20. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT WDLNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. A

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3 Hwy. 242 left turn lane widening TxDOT began work on a project to widen a left turn lane on Hwy. 242 from Harper’s Way to Great Oaks Drive in March. The project was 9% complete in mid-May, and completion was expected in the second quarter of 2020, according to TxDOT. Timeline: March-second quarter Cost: $575,000 Funding source: federal funds through TxDOT 4 Hwy. 242 overpass at FM 1314 The project will construct a grade separation along Hwy. 242 from west to east of FM 1314. This is the rst of four projects to construct an overpass at Hwy. 242 and FM 1314. The project was 70% complete as of mid-May. Timeline: July 2018-third quarter 2020 Cost: $23.5 million Funding source: federal funds through TxDOT

Timeline: April-early fall Cost: $1.5 million Funding source: Montgomery County Precinct 3 2 FM 2978 widening The project will widen FM 2978 from two to four lanes with a center turn lane from FM 1488 to south of Dry Creek in Phase 1 and from south of Dry Creek to Conroe-Hufsmith Road in Phase 2. The existing bridge over Spring Creek will also be widened. As of mid-May, Phase 1 was 42% complete, and Phase 2 was 69% complete, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. Work on the bridge was 82% complete. Timeline: September 2018-second quarter 2021 (Phase 1), January 2018-third quarter 2020 (Phase 2), October 2018-third quarter 2020 (bridge) Cost: $21.3 million (Phase 1), $12.9 million (Phase 2), $7.6 million (bridge) Funding sources: TxDOT, federal funds

BEN THOMPSONCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

1 Lake Woodlands Drive widening Montgomery County Precinct 3 is widen- ing a 0.17-mile section of Lake Wood- lands Drive from west of Six Pines Drive to the western side of I-45. The project includes adding a third westbound lane between I-45 and Pinecroft Drive and making the inside lane a left turn lane. The project will be funded through the 2015 Montgomery County road bond and will be completed in the fall, Precinct 3 ocials said. As of May 18, improvements were slated to begin at the intersec- tion near the Pinecroft Center and The Woodlands Mall.

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in The Woodlands area

COMPILED BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN

PHOTOS BY ANDREW CHRISTMANCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

EAST SHORE LANDING HOMES Construction is underway on East Shore Landing, a new housing community under development by David Weekley Homes. The gated community began construction on the homes in April and features designs with a New Orleans-style air, according to David Weekley Homes spokesperson Corinne Giacomarro. Homes will range from 2,200-3,100 square feet.

GOSLINGROAD SHOPPING CENTER A shopping center at 24345 Gosling Road was scheduled to nish construction in June. Patrick Magliaro, a representative with Triad Real Estate Consulting Group, said the 33,000-square-foot center is split between two buildings. Conrmed tenants will include Shipley’s Donuts, Center Court Pizza and Brew, Adom Family Dentistry and Fajita Pete’s. Timeline: businesses opening in fall Size: 33,000 square feet

APARTMENTS AT TIMBERLOCH PLACE, SIX PINES DRIVE A multifamily complex being developed by Howard Hughes Corp. is nearing completion. The seven-story apartment complex sits on 1.67 acres and will include 163 residences, according to Howard Hughes ocials. Leasing is anticipated to begin later this fall. Timeline: completion in the summer Size: 1.67-acre site

Timeline: Work began in April Size: 2,200-3,100 square feet

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WORTHWHILE CONVERSATIONS WHAT NOW? WEALTH PLANNING AFTER COVID-19…

DOES THE COVID-19 EXPERIENCE MEAN THAT WEALTH PLANNING IS NOW TOTALLY DIFFERENT? No, not necessarily. Market and economic conditions continue to change, but good wealth planning comes from being consistent in making sound decisions. HOW CAN YOU MAKE SOUND DECISIONS WHEN THE FUTURE IS SO UNCERTAIN? In nearly 50 years of wealth planning, we have worked with families who can personally recall terribly uncertain conditions. In 1962, the United States and the Soviet Union were staring each other down over nuclear missiles in Cuba and plenty of people felt it could be the end of civilization. In 1974, a sitting U.S. President resigned from office in disgrace and the average citizen’s faith in our government reached an all-time low. There have been times, of course, when the future looked bright. In 2000, we ushered in a new Millennium amidst great optimism, following a decade that saw the fall of the Iron Curtain and a peace dividend. SO, WHAT IS YOUR POINT? Certainty or uncertainty about the future is an unreliable basis for building wealth. Ryan Patterson, CFA, CFP ® , our Chief Investment

Officer, puts it this way: “When everyone is feeling good about the future, the prices of financial assets are higher, reflecting that feeling. When few people feel good, prices are discounted and opportunities are greater.” If you invested in U.S. stocks during the month of the Cuban missile crisis, you were 30% richer one year later. If you put money to work in U.S. stocks during the month Richard Nixon resigned the Presidency, you were 250% richer ten years later. If you waited for the turn of the Millennium to put your money to work in U.S. stocks, you were 35% worse off two years later. SO -- THE MORE THINGS CHANGE, THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME? Circumstances may change but financial behavior should be disciplined, not reactive. Most families benefit from the coaching of an experienced, 100% fiduciary wealth advisor. That is the model we follow at Linscomb & Williams. We have the credentialled and experienced team ready to sit down and formulate a plan for your success right now, right here. For more information, or a copy of our Form ADV, Part II, with all of our disclosures, call Grant Williams at 281 841 0707, or visit www.linscomb-williams.com.

J. Harold Williams, Chairman & CEO, and Craig Ivy discuss how to adjust wealth planning during uncertain market conditions following COVID-19. (Left to right: B. Craig Ivy, AIF ® ; J. Harold Williams, CPA/PFS, CFP ® )

1925 Hughes Landing Blvd., Ste. 200 The Woodlands, Texas 77380 281.841.0707 www.linscomb-williams.com Linscomb & Williams is not an accounting firm.

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

SALES TAXDROP According to the Texas comptroller, The Woodlands Township and the cities of Shenandoah and Oak Ridge North saw their May net sales tax payments decrease from 2019 to 2020. May payments reect March sales activity. T H E WO O D L A N D S *

GOVERNMENT TheWoodlands-area entities see drop in state sales tax payments

MAY 2020

MAY 2019

SALES TAX NET PAYMENT

SALES TAX NET PAYMENT

The release of sales tax allocations from the Texas comptroller’s oce in early May shows how coronavirus closures in March may have aected The Woodlands, Oak Ridge North and Shenandoah, but ocials said more data will be needed to determine the long-term eects on revenue. TheWoodlands Township In The Woodlands, the May net sales tax payment of about $3.86 million for March activity was a decline of 7.43% from the same month the previous year, according to information from the comptrol- ler’s oce. That gure represents payments from both The Woodlands Township and The Woodlands Town- ship Economic Development Zone, which each collect 1% sales tax across the same geographic area. Monique Sharp, the township’s assistant general manager for nance and administration, said deposits for the month declined by $316,174, or around 7.4%. However, she said, on a year-to-date basis, sales tax revenue is 3.4% higher than the same period for 2019 and is $375,919, or 1.7%, higher than budgeted. “The township board and sta anticipate sales tax revenues will continue to be impacted in the coming months,” Sharp said May 7. “Because we cannot accurately predict the extent of those impacts until more data is available, the board is budget planning for a range of possibilities.” BY ANDREW CHRISTMAN, VANESSA HOLT & BEN THOMPSON

In April, the board established a budget task force consisting of Directors Bruce Rieser, John Anthony Brown and Bob Milner. “The task force has been working to develop a plan that will address revenue shortfalls in 2020 with a combination of decreases in operating expenses, deferrals of capital projects and limited utilization of reserve balances,” Sharp said. The task force presented its recom- mendations for potential budget cuts to the board May 21. According to information presented at the meet- ing, shortfalls of up to 50% could be addressed through reserves held for bond redemption, incorporation or other uses. Township budget workshops will According to information from the comptroller’s oce, the city of Shenandoah’s May net sales tax payment of about $405,560 for March activity was 26.54% lower than the $552,085 payment reported last May. The city’s year-to-date payments saw a smaller annual drop of 3.64%, with net sales tax payments decreasing from $2.51 million as of May 2019 to $2.42 million as of May 2020. Shenandoah Finance Director Lisa Wasner said the city will continue to adjust its budgeting plans as more information about the scal eects of the coronavirus becomes available. “We are currently meeting be held in August. City of Shenandoah

DOWN 7.43%

$4.17M

$3.86M

S H E N A N D OA H

MAY 2020

MAY 2019

SALES TAX NET PAYMENT

SALES TAX NET PAYMENT

DOWN 26.54%

$552,085

$405,560

OA K R I D G E N O R T H

MAY 2020

MAY 2019

SALES TAX NET PAYMENT

SALES TAX NET PAYMENT

DOWN 15.18%

$340,949

$289,188

*INCLUDES THE WOODLANDS TOWNSHIP AND THE WOODLANDS TOWNSHIP ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ZONE

SOURCE: TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

internally and looking at our oper- ational and capital budgets for the current and upcoming year and will make continual modications as we receive more information,” Wasner said in April. City of Oak Ridge North Oak Ridge North’s May net sales tax payment of $289,188 for March activity is a 15.18% decrease over the $340,949 net sales tax payment it made in May 2019, according to information from the state comptrol- ler’s oce. The year-to-date net sales tax payments of $1.13 million this May is 5.67% less than the approximately

$1.2 million the city had collected by May in 2019. According to the city’s scal year 2019-20 budget approved last August, $2 million in sales taxes were expected to be collected over the current scal year. City Manager Heather Neeley said the city is expecting at least a 35% drop from its budgeted sales tax revenue for April. The city is expected to begin planning for its FY 2020-21 budget through spring and early summer before budget workshops begin in July. The city’s budget and tax rate are scheduled to be voted on at the city’s Aug. 24 council meeting.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Into the woods W.G. Jones State Forest was closed from April 7-20 but reopened afterward with certain restrictions. Other area parks remain open for many activities. I’VE SEENPEOPLE CONNECT TONATURE INWAYS THEYNEVERHAVE BEFORE. SUZANNE SIMPSON, LAND STEWARDSHIP DIRECTOR FOR THE BAYOU LAND CONSERVANCY

ENVIRONMENT

Parks provide outdoor escape for residents during shutdown

BY BEN THOMPSON

its 15 miles of hiking trails. State parks and forests were

As business closures and stay-at- home orders implemented this spring halted many regular daily activities for residents of The Woodlands area, visitors seeking an outdoor escape from their homes ocked to local parks and preserves. “We’ve seen an uptick in activity pretty much throughout this cri- sis,” said Suzanne Simpson, land stewardship director for the Bayou Land Conservancy, a Houston-based nonprot that preserves land in areas including Spring Creek Greenway and the 13-mile Spring Creek Nature Trail. “I’ve seen people connect to nature in ways they never have before.” Connor Murnane, a forester with the Texas A&M Forest Service, said the already well-attended urban W.G. Jones State Forest area north and south of FM 1488 has attracted more people than usual this spring on

W.G. JONES STATE FOREST 15 miles of trails Visitors must: • enter in groups no larger than ve people • wear face coverings • maintain 6 feet of distance in the park

SPRING CREEK NATURE TRAILHEAD

HARRIS COUNTY PRECINCT 4 PARKS Includes Burroughs Park in Tomball • Parks are open to visitors. • Interior spaces

THE WOODLANDS TOWNSHIP 200 miles of trails • Pathways and trails have

closed from April 7-20, and Gov. Greg Abbott’s executive order May 5 stated outdoor activities such as hunting, shing and jogging were among the daily activities allowed with precau- tions such as social distancing. “We typically clock in at 8 a.m., and people are there well before that already out on the trails,” Murnane said. Chris Nunes, director of The Wood- lands Township Parks and Recreation Department, said the township’s more than 200 miles of pathways and trails have also seen a spike in use. “We in The Woodlands have a community that’s built on our pathways and trails, and people already used them at a tremendous level pre-COVID. And the last seven, eight weeks, that use has gone up exponentially,” Nunes said.

13-mile trail • Trails have

remained open to visitors.

remained open, and individual parks and amenities vary in activities allowed.

are closed aside from restrooms. permitted in groups of four or fewer.

• Sports are

SOURCES: THE WOODLANDS TOWNSHIP, W.G. JONES STATE FOREST, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, HARRIS COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GOVERNMENT

LEGISLATIVE OUTLOOK Topics relating to the 2020 outbreak of the coronavirus are likely to inuence the Texas legislative agenda in 2021, Montgomery County-area legislators said in a May 15 meeting.

TEXAS 87TH LEGISLATIVE SESSION

JAN. 12 , 2021

MAY 31 , 2021

BEGINS:

ENDS:

POTENTIAL TOPICS FOR LEGISLATION IN 2021:

• State budget shortfalls stemming from coronavirus shutdowns beginning in March • Economic recovery and consumer condence

• Unemployment • Online learning at public schools and universities • Property appraisals

• Property tax reform • Mental health and substance misuse • Disaster and pandemic response plans

SOURCES: STATE SEN. BRANDON CREIGHTON AND STATE REP. STEVE TOTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Montgomery County-area legislators discuss possible COVID19 response for 2021 session

BY BEN THOMPSON

are going to be the forgotten people; these are going to be the forgotten deaths, and I think we all need to take that into consideration.” Toth and Creighton said Texas overall has seen less proportional COVID-19 cases and related deaths than other large states or metro- politan areas across the country. As of June 2, the Montgomery County Public Health District reported 497 active COVID-19 cases, 487 recover- ies and 26 deaths out of 1,010 total conrmed cases. “What was forecast did not happen. That, here in Montgomery County, we were told that by April 24 we would see 100,000 cases and that we would be growing by 20,000 a day. We were told that we could have upwards of 8,000 people hospitalized with hundreds and hundreds of deaths,” Toth said. Creighton said some disaster or pandemic response plans may need to be adjusted to allow for more local approaches in the future given how the situation in Texas has played out so far. “Containment and mitigation, with what we knew at the time, was the road that we needed to travel down,” he said. “We’ve also learned that we need more of a regional approach to be able to respond and be nimble and exible once we understand that the data shows that we just were not impacted by this like the northeast- ern part of the country and other parts of the world.”

The legislators also said any recovery of the Texas economy and unemployment will hinge on the reopening of some industries and the willingness of state residents to return to work and resume consump- tion activity. “We have to gure out a way to inspire people to understand that they can feel comfortable getting back out into their normal routines,” Creighton said. Toth and Creighton said providing for public schools and universities through their shifts to online learning would also be a priority over the coming year. “All levels of government are going to have to tighten their belt. This is going to be a tough ride for govern- ment,” Toth said. A continued focus on property appraisals will be a goal next spring as well, they said, as a follow-up to last year’s property tax reform package, Senate Bill 2. COVID19 in Texas Toth said increased reports of depression and substance use disor- ders have become unintended side eects of isolation caused by govern- ment coronavirus responses, and he hopes treatment of those issues can be included in the lawmakers’ health care and social discussions going forward. “We have to be cognizant of this and not just look at the health chal- lenge of COVID-19,” he said. “These

State legislators representing portions of Montgomery County said economic recovery and future pandemic response could head up the topics that will be discussed in the 87th Texas legislative session in 2021. State Sen. Brandon Creighton, RConroe, and state Rep. Steve Toth, RThe Woodlands, met with local community representatives and busi- ness leaders May 15 as part of a video conference hosted by The Woodlands Area Chamber of Commerce to discuss pandemic response and any policy concerns heading into the 2021 legislative session. The legislators said they anticipate budget shortfalls stemming from ongoing eorts to stop the spread of the virus, including the temporary economic shutdown. “We denitely know that the budget is going to be a concern for everyone. Last session we came into the legislative session with the comp- troller certifying more than $8 billion in additional revenue than we had had the previous two-year biennium. This is going to be a very dierent outlook,” Creighton said. Toth likened the upcoming legis- lative session budgeting approach to the Legislature’s work following the economic downturn of 2009. “We’ve done this before after the subprime crash in ‘08 and ‘09 in what was called the ‘Great Recession’ then. We’re going to have a similar budget outlook this time around,” Creighton said.

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

WATER

SCENARIOS SPELLED OUT

Two weeks after The Woodlands Water Agency voted to oppose San Jacinto River Authority rate increases, an SJRA review committee recommended not increasing rates in 2020-21.

$4.00

SCENARIO C: $3.61 SCENARIO D: $3.51 SCENARIO B: $3.27 SCENARIO A: $3.16 SCENARIO K: $3.15 SCENARIO L: $3.24 SCENARIO D: $3.06 SCENARIO B: $2.84 SCENARIO K: $2.73 SCENARIO L: $2.81 SCENARIO A: $2.74 SCENARIO C: $3.14

San Jacinto River Authority Groundwater Reduction Plan Committee chose Scenario K, which will be voted on June 22. GROUND WATER FEE Cost to pump and import water from aquifers SURFACE WATER FEE Cost to treat and import surface water

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FY 2014-15

FY 2016-17

FY 2018-19

FY 2020-21

SOURCE: SAN JACINTO RIVER AUTHORITYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SJRA to vote to keepwater xed at FY 201920 rates afterWoodlandsWater Agency opposed increase

713-224-3426 1403 Spring Cypress Rd Spring

BY EVA VIGH

$4.78 million and $252,397, respec- tively, as of March 31. Quadvest, a private utility company, also sued the SJRA on the grounds the entity is monopolizing surface water resources in the area and has set costly and unjust rates. Quadvest led for a temporary injunction from hav- ing to pay GRP fees while its lawsuits are going on, Kelling said. When entities do not pay the GRP rates, the cost burden falls on other participants, SJRA ocials said. Not raising rates in the next scal year means entities will still need to pay for the costs in the future, ocials said. “It’s not free money,” Kelling said “At some point in time in the near future, this money’s going to have to be repaid.” WWA General Manager Jim Stinson said in a June 1 email the agency supports SJRA’s eorts in court but will not pass the costs on to residents. “We understand making up short pays and legal expenses from the GRP debt-service reserve may require replenishment at some point,” he said.

depending on how several lawsuits pan out. The rates will be approved, along with the scal year 2020-21 budget, by the SJRA board June 22. After the WWA meeting, Kelling said he went back to the drawing board and presented two additional options: Scenario K and Scenario L. The one chosen, Scenario K, was requested by the WWA and included the same rates as the current scal year, covering only the operations and maintenance of the surface water plant as well as its transmission sys- tem and GRP debt service. The rates do not include legal costs associated with lawsuits nor the uncollected rev- enue from Conroe and Magnolia. The projected legal costs of $1.76 million would be included in the budget but not in the rate, in this scenario. In Scenario L, the rates would increase by 3.3% and cover all costs except for the uncollected revenue. In 2016, the cities of Conroe and Magnolia refused to pay for increased rates, deeming them an unfair burden to residents. According to the SJRA, these cities owe a total of

After outlining several possible rate increase scenarios for scal year 2020- 21, the San Jacinto River Authority’s Groundwater Reduction Plan Review Committee opted May 26 to direct the SJRA to keep the rates unchanged. Proposals to increase the rates—cur- rently set at $2.73 per 1,000 gallons for groundwater and $3.15 per 1,000 gal- lons for surface water—had been met with opposition from The Woodlands Water Agency, the managing body for the 11 municipal utility districts in The Woodlands. The board voted May 13 to direct its Woodlands Groundwater Reduction Plan representative to vote to not pay for anticipated increased SJRA surface water rates related to legal fees or budget shortfalls due to other entities—such as the cities of Conroe and Magnolia—not paying their share. Previously, SJRA’s Deputy General Manager Ron Kelling outlined four potential rate scenarios based on the outcomes of legal scenarios. The scenarios projected increases next scal year by between 0.4% to 14.5%

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THE WOODLANDS EDITION • JUNE 2020

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