Southwest Nashville Edition March 2020

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 12  MARCH 21APRIL 21, 2020

ONLINE AT

LaunchingNashville’snext transportationplan GreenHills residents call formore transit options, connectivity as city population grows

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Due to the fast-changing nature of coronavirus in the region, readers should visit communityimpact.com to nd the latest coverage on announcements, case numbers, school closures and more. Nashville begins tornado recovery: How to help

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neighborhoods were surveyed across the city.

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1. Bellevue 2. Downtown 3. Green Hills 4. South 5. East 6. Antioch 7. Bordeaux 8. North 9. Joelton 10. West 11. Donelson

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Resident input Mayor John Cooper held a series of neighborhood

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More than 2,200 residents participated in a city survey.

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meetings in January and February to ask

toward bikeways and sidewalks 16% RESIDENTS ALLOCATED N

26% toward transit projects

IMPACTS

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residents what projects to include in the city’s new transportation plan.

SOURCE: METRO NASHVILLECOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY WENDY STURGES

American Community Survey. That growth has brought jobs and new development to the area, but it has also brought an increase in trac. As part of his 2019 campaign promise

to develop a new comprehensive trans- portation plan, Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper’s oce held a series of community engagement meetings in CONTINUED ON 14

Since 2010, Nashville’s population has grown by more than 11%, adding more than 70,000 people to the area, according to the U.S. Census Bureau

TRANSPORTATION UPDATES

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MNPS says $1B needed to fully fund schools

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SENIOR LIVING GUIDE SENIOR 2020

BY WENDY STURGES

In the midst of Nashville’s cash ow issues, one of the biggest concerns this budget season is how the city will fund Metro Nashville Public Schools. In a series of community meet- ings held in February, MNPS ocials presented a proposed budget for the 2020-21 school year that includes a baseline—funding only for what is needed to maintain schools—of $950.2 million, a 3% increase over the previous year. MNPS Interim Director of Schools Adrienne Battle said more is needed to fully fund the district, but those CONTINUED ON 19

SENIOR LIVING GUIDE

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RENDERING COURTESY NASHVILLE SC

More than two years after Nashville was awarded a professional soccer franchise, city ocials and Nashville Stadium progresses despite ongoing litigation Soccer Holdings—the ownership group behind the Major League Soccer team, Nashville SC— announced on Feb. 13 they had CONTINUED ON 17 Nashville strikes newsoccer deal BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERNASHVILLE METRO Lacy Klasel GENERAL MANAGER Mary Ella Hazelwood, mhazelwood@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Krista Wadsworth EDITOR Wendy Sturges REPORTER Dylan Skye Aycock COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Tammy Friedman DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Aubrey Galloway GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chelsea King BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 3401 Mallory Lane, Ste. 112 Franklin, TN 37067 • 6159742060 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES swnnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

FROMMARY ELLA: Our hearts go out to the residents and business owners in the Greater Nashville area aected by tornado strikes earlier this month. For ways on how you can help the area recover, check out our sidebar on Page 5. Mary Ella Hazelwood, GENERALMANAGER

FROMWENDY: This issue features our annual Senior Living Guide (see Pages 10-11) with data on Nashville’s growing population of residents age 65 and older as well as on senior communities.

TODO LIST

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Local events and things to do TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 7 Mayor Cooper announces legislation regulating ‘transpotainment’ vehicles CITY& COUNTY 8 Latest local news

Wendy Sturges, EDITOR

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 17

New businesses 13

Community events 10

Senior living communities 15

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Community updates BUSINESS FEATURE Preservation Station DINING FEATURE

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MARCH 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or closing

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4 Roundabout Market and Cafe opened Feb. 10 in Music Row at 1600 Division St., Nashville. The restaurant offers coffee, smoothies and sandwiches as well as grab-and-go items from Bongo Bakery and Corner Market. 615-920-0301. www.roundaboutmarketandcafe.com 5 Bento Living , an 89-unit residential building with additional spaces reserved for hotel and extended-stay guests, opened in January in Wedgewood- Houston at 321 Hart St., Nashville. The residence offers leasing options for one- to two-bedroom apartments as well as for 350-square-foot “micro units.” This summer, the company is ex- pected to add a restaurant, an athletic club and other amenities, according to 6 Nurture Nashville Yoga hosted a grand opening event Feb. 29 at 992 Davidson Drive, Ste. 102, Nashville. The company, formerly known as Blooma, has one other location in East Nash- ville. Although Nurture Nashville Yoga specializes in prenatal and postpartum yoga, the studio also offers various classes for men, teens and children. 615-797-8064. www.nurturenashville.com 7 Poindexter , a cafe offering coffee, smoothies, breakfast sandwiches and other dishes, opened in January inside Graduate Nashville at 101 20th Ave. N., Nashville. The new 205-room hotel in Midtown also opened the Cross-Eyed Critters Watering Hole, an animatronic karaoke bar featuring a trio of robotic backing musicians. 615-551-2700. www.graduatehotels.com/nashville its website. 629-231-4001. www.bentochestnuthill.com

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NOWOPEN 1 Whole Foods Market opened its newest Tennessee location Feb. 28 at 1202 Broad- way, Nashville, according to a represen- tative for the company. The grocery store features a full-service butcher, ready-to- cook options, an in-house bakery, a large bulk section, a full-service coffee bar and items from local producers. Whole Foods also has two additional store locations

3 National restaurant chain Dunkin’ opened Feb. 4 at 400 21st Ave. S., Nash- ville. The new location features the com- pany’s “next generation” concept, which includes a modern design, digital kiosks, a pickup area for mobile orders and more. The chain bakery serves doughnuts as well as hot and iced coffees, sandwiches and other baked goods. 615-724-1909. www.dunkindonuts.com

planned for the Greater Nashville area; however, locations and opening dates have not yet been announced. 615-440-5100 www.wholefoodsmarket.com 2 FruttaBowls opened Feb. 1 inWest End at 2424 Elliston Place, Nashville. The eatery serves colorful smoothie bowls made with acai, kale, pitaya and granola as well as oatmeal, coffee and other beverages. 615-750-5240. www.fruttabowls.com

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8 Tin Cup Coffee opened in January in The Gulch at 1201 Demonbreun St., Nashville. Tin Cup Coffee has locations in Madison and inside Opry Mills. The cafe serves coffee, specialty espresso drinks, pastries, paninis and more. The space was previously home to Kona Espresso Bar. 615-920-5998. www.tincup.coffee COMING SOON 9 Dallas-based retailer Half Price Books will open May 21 near Belle Meade at 21 White Bridge Road, Nashville, according to the company’s website. The store offers new and used books, comics, DVDs, records, magazines and other items. Half Price Books now has more than 120 stores in the U.S. www.hpb.com 10 Chase Bank has plans to open a branch in Green Hills at 3811 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville, according to a building permit issued by Metro Nashville. The company, which offers personal banking, credit cards and other financial services, opened its first Tennessee location in December in Berry Hill at 2645 8th Ave. S., Nashville. An open- ing date for the Green Hills location has not been announced. www.chase.com 11 Meal-prep company Twisted Foods is opening in the spring in Hillsboro Village at 2111 Belcourt Ave., Nashville, according to a social media post from the company. In addition to offering customized pre- pared meals for a variety of diets, Twisted Foods will also serve dine-in and takeout options. www.twistedfoods.menu 12 Fifth Third Bank will open a branch at 1715 West End Ave., Nashville, according to a building permit issued by Metro Nashville. In November, Fifth Third Bank opened a

branch at 2814 West End Ave., Nashville. The company offers personal banking, consumer loans and investment services. An opening date has not been announced. www.53.com RELOCATIONS 13 Nashville-based women’s cloth- ing and accessories shop Molly Green relocated in early February to a new space inside The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Ste. 175, Nashville, according to a social media post from the company. Molly Green opened its first 14 Kittenish , a retail brand founded by country singer Jessie James Decker, cele- brated its first anniversary Feb. 16 in The Gulch at 304 11th Ave. S., Nashville. The shop offers clothing, shoes, accessories and gift items. 615-873-4344. www.kittenish.com NEWOWNERSHIP 15 Simon Property Group , the com- pany that owns Opry Mills and several other shopping centers around the U.S., plans to finalize its purchase of Taubman Centers Inc. by mid-2020, according to a Feb. 10 news release. Taubman Centers Inc. operates The Mall at Green Hills, 2126 Abbott Martin Road, Nashville, as well as 23 other properties in the U.S. and Asia. 615-298-5478. www.shopgreenhills.com store in 2011. 615-238-2005. www.shopmollygreen.com ANNIVERSARIES

A tornado hit portions of northeast Nashville and nearby counties March 3.

ALEX HOSEY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CLOSINGS 16 Home decor store Apple & Oak closed Jan. 25 in Hillsboro Village at 1818 21st Ave. S., Nashville, according to a social media post from the owner. The company’s East Nashville location at 717 Porter Road, Nash- ville, will remain open. The shop sells rugs, apparel and gift items. www.appleandoaknash.com 17 Clothing retailer Native + Nomad closed in February in Hillsboro Village at In the aftermath of a tornado in the Middle Tennessee region March 3, community groups are working to help families and residents aected by the storm. Here are some ways to help. This list is not comprehensive. The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee activated a Middle Tennessee Emergency Support Fund on March 3, which will award grants to local nonprots providing services, according to a social media post from the organization. Those wishing to make a donation to CFMT can visit their website. 888-540-5200. www.cfmt.org The United Way of Greater Nashville has activated its Restore the Dream Fund, which helps to provide long-term NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT RELIEF FORMIDDLE TENNESSEE

1813 21st Ave. S., Nashville, according to signs posted at the location. The shop, which opened in 2015, sold ethi- cal and sustainable clothing brands. 18 Pie Five Pizza, a restaurant chain specializing in personal pan pizzas, closed two locations in the Nashville area, including the restaurant at 810 Gale Lane, Nashville, and another in Franklin, according to signs posted on the doors at both locations. The restaurant opened in 2016. www.piefivepizza.com support for individuals aected. The organization is also working to keep its 211 resource and referral phone line updated with information for people in need of shelter, food and additional services. Those interested in donating to the fund can visit www.unitedwaynashville.org or text RESTORE20 to 41444. Hands On Nashville is a local organization that helps connect residents to volunteer opportunities. 615-298-1108. www.hon.org. Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee is working to provide food to those in need. Residents can sign up to receive more information about how to help by emailing volunteer@ secondharvestmidtn.org. 615-329-3491. www.secondharvestmidtn.org

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MARCH 2020

TODO LIST

March-April events

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

NASHVILLEWINE & FOOD FESTIVAL OMNI NASHVILLE HOTEL

APRIL 25

APRIL 04

WORTH THE TRIP PUBLIC SQUARE PARK

THE NASHVILLE CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL This event will feature music, dancing, children’s activities, sumo- suit wrestling, demonstrations and food vendors. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Public Square Park, 1 Public Square, Nashville. 615-663-6060. www.nashvillecherryblossom festival.org (Courtesy Nashville Cherry Blossom Festival)

Park, 3021 Lealand Lane, Nashville. 615-383-0994. www.pcat.org/festival 18 EARTHDAY INNASHVILLE Nashville’s Earth Day Festival will feature exhibits and hands-on activities as well as live music, food vendors and more. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Centennial Park, 2500 West End Ave., Nashville. The Chinese Arts Alliance of Nashville will host Tai Chi and Qigong demonstrations and workshops at Fannie Mae Dees Park in Hillsboro Village. Athletic attire is recommended. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Fannie Mae Dees Park, 2400 Blakemore Ave., Nashville. 615-385-9341. www.chineseartsalliance.org 25 THROUGH 26 ART ON THEWEST SIDE Now in its seventh year, the Gordon Jewish Community Center will host Art on the West Side, a two-day event showcasing the work of more than 50 artists. 6-9 p.m. (Sat.), 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (Sun.). $15 (suggested donation) (Sat.), free (Sun.). Gordon Jewish Community Center, 801 Percy Warner Blvd., Nashville. 615-356-7170. www.artonthewestside.org 25 THROUGH 26 ST. JUDE ROCK ‘N’ ROLL NASHVILLEMARATHON Thousands of runners, walkers and spectators will gather in support of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for the 21st annual event. Along with two races on Sunday for children and pets, the main race on Saturday includes four distances: a marathon, a half-marathon, a 6.15-mile and a 5K. 7:15 a.m. (marathon, half-marathon), 6:45 a.m. (5K, 6.15-mile). 8th Avenue and Broadway (marathon, half- marathon), 8th Avenue and Demonbreun Street (5K, 6.15-mile). $20-$125. www.runrocknroll.com Guests can sample food and drinks from more than 50 wineries, 10 breweries and 20 restaurants as well as shop at an on-site market featuring local vendors. The annual event raises funds for the Nashville Symphony. Noon-4 p.m. $40-$135. Omni Nashville Hotel, 250 5th Ave. S., Nashville. www.thenashwineand foodfestival.com (Courtesy Nashville Wine & Food Festival) www.nashvilleearthday.org 25 2020WORLD TAI CHI ANDQIGONG DAY

Jonathan Jackson will perform at City Winery in April. (Courtesy Christie Goodwill)

LIVEMUSIC Check out live music in Southwest Nashville this spring. BRIDGESTONE ARENA 501 Broadway, Nashville 615-770-2000 www.bridgestonearena.com MARCH 27 Billie Eilish, 7:30 p.m. APRIL

MARCH 28 KINDERGARTEN READINESS FAIR

25 Drive-By Truckers, 8 p.m. CITYWINERY 609 Lafayette St., Nashville 615-324-1010 www.citywinery.com MARCH 30 Al Jardine, 8 p.m. 31 Brett Dennen, 8 p.m. APRIL 03 Jerey Steele, 8 p.m. 10 Jonathan Jackson and Enation, 8 p.m. 15 Mike Phillips, 8 p.m. 17 Hayes Carll, 8 p.m. 19 Victor Wooten, 8 p.m. CANNERY BALLROOMAND MERCY LOUNGE 1 Cannery Row, Nashville 615-251-3020 www.mercylounge.com MARCH

Metro Nashville Public Schools will host a school readiness fair for kindergarten students entering the 2020-21 academic year. The event will serve as a one-stop shop for kindergarten enrollment, information booths, student immunizations, school bus information and other services. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Lentz Public Health Center, 2500 Charlotte Ave., Nashville. 615-259-4636. www.mnps.org 28 FULL BLOOMMARKET Shoppers can browse items from local clothing, decor and lifestyle vendors, including Denizen Nashville, Molly Green and more. Cider and other beverages will be available for purchase from Diskin Cider. Noon-6 p.m. Free (admission). Diskin Cider, 1235 Martin St., Nashville. www.facebook.com/silerandwest APRIL 03 WINE FESTIVAL &TASTING 2020 The Nashville Predators Foundation will host its 15th annual Wine Festival & Tasting at Bridgestone Arena. The festival includes more than 225 wines, beers and spirits as well as food samples from local restaurants and a silent auction. 6 p.m. $39-$300. Bridgestone Arena, 501 Broadway, Nashville. 615-770-2121. www.nhl.com/predators/community 18 PINWHEEL FESTIVAL This free, family-friendly event will oer activities, such as crafts, bounce houses and face painting. The 11th annual event, hosted by Prevent Child Abuse Tennessee, will take place at Sevier Park in 12 South. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Sevier

10 Chris Tomlin, 7 p.m. 20 Niall Horan, 7 p.m.

25 Brian Fallon, 8 p.m. 26 Blue October, 8 p.m. 31 Laura Marling, 8 p.m. APRIL 02 Jill Andrews, 8 p.m. 04 Stephen Malkmus, 8 p.m. 22 The Driver Era, 8 p.m. 25 Waxahatchee, 8 p.m. EXITIN 2208 Elliston Place, Nashville 615-915-2256 www.exitin.com APRIL 02 Lackhoney, 8 p.m. 04 The Delta Saints, 9 p.m. 11 Deaeaven, 9 p.m. 25 Vanessa Carlton, 9 p.m.

RymanAuditorium(Lindsay Scott/ Community Impact Newspaper)

RYMANAUDITORIUM 116 5th Ave. N., Nashville 615-889-3060 www.ryman.com MARCH 27 The Cadillac Three, 8 p.m. APRIL 4 Lucero, 8 p.m. 5 Mandy Moore, 7:30 p.m. 22 Sharon Van Etten, 7:30 p.m. 24 The Lone Bellow, 8 p.m.

Find more or submit local events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication. Event dates current as of press time, however in light of the recent coronavirus outbreak, they could be subject to cancellation.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Cooper announces initiative to regulate

ONGOING PROJECTS

allow cities to regulate transpotain- ment vehicles in the same way they regulate passenger transportation service vehicles. Cities would have the power to decide whether the vehicles can operate on local roads during peak commute times, prevent the use of loudmusic during business operation hours and regulate safety policies for passengers and residents. “We want to ensure that everyone who visits Music City has a great time,” Cooper said in a Feb. 27 statement. “However, the complete lack of local control over these entertain- ment vehicles in one of our busiest neighborhoods has created safety concerns and tremendous headaches for both downtown brick-and-mortar businesses, residents, and local commuters. By working with the state, we hope to ensure that downtown Nashville remains a fun, world-class tourist destination while implementing common-sense policies that prevent trac jams and disturbances to local residents and businesses.” Downtown-area ocials have expressed support for the bill, citing the inconvenience that

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I-440 reconstruction The Tennessee Department of Transportation expects to nish work this summer to reconstruct a 7-mile stretch of I-440 from I-40 to I-24 in Davidson County. The project will replace deteriorating concrete pavement with asphalt, widen the I-440 bridge over I-65 and upgrade the entire roadway to three lanes in each direction. Timeline: late 2018-August 2020 Cost: $152.9 million Funding: TDOT

“Transpotainment” vehicles are primarily found in downtown Nashville. (Wendy Sturges/Community Impact Newspaper)

Nashville residents who work, live or even visit downtown have likely noticed the presence of tourists riding “transpotainment” vehicles, which range frombicycle-powered pedal pubs to hot tubs pulled by trailers. Currently, state law does not allow cities and local municipalities to regulate these transpotainment vehicles, which are often found near Broadway. However, Metro Nashville may soon be able to regulate how these slow-moving vehicles are used on city streets thanks to legislation proposed through a partnership between local lawmakers, the Nashville Downtown Partnership and Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper. Senate Bill 2513, led Feb. 5 by Sen. Steve Dickerson, RNashville, would

transpotainment vehicles often create for residents who drive and walk downtown. “These vehicles initially added to the character and fun of the city, but with our rapid growth has come the unintended consequences of growing pains,” said Butch Spyridon, president and CEO of the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corporation, in a statement. “While no one intends to eliminate this aspect of our entertainment, we need tomake sure that downtown remains a great place to live and work, as well as visit.” As of press time, the bill had just been referred to the Tennessee Senate Transportation and Safety Committee.

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF 3220. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SWNNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MARCH 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News fromMetro Nashville and Belle Meade

QUOTEOFNOTE “MYADMINISTRATION IS COMMITTED TO MATCHING THE COURAGE AND STRENGTHOF SPIRIT SHOWNBY THE TORNADO SURVIVORS.” JOHN COOPER, MAYOR OF METRO NASHVILLE CORONAVIRUSUPDATES For the latest on coronavirus outbreaks and news in Davidson County, visit communityimpact.com. Metro Nashville Public Schools Meets March 24 and April 14 at 5 p.m. at the MNPS Administration Building, 2601 Bransford Ave., Nashville. 615-259-4636. www.mnps.org MEETINGSWE COVER MEETINGSWE COVER Oak Hill Board of Commissioners Meets March 24 at 5 p.m. at City Office, 5548 Franklin Pike, Ste. 102, Nashville. 615-371-8291. www.oakhilltn.us Metro Nashville Council Meets April 7 and 21 at 6:30 p.m. in the David Scobey Council Chamber at the Metro Council, 1 Public Square, Nashville. Meetings are also live-streamed online. 615-862-6780. www.nashville.gov/metro-council Berry Hill Board of Commissioners Meets April 6 at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 698 Thompson Lane, Nashville. 615-292-5531. www.berryhilltn.org Belle Meade Board of Commissioners Meets April 15 at 4 p.m. at City Hall, 4705 Harding Road,

Mayor John Cooper announcesmillions in capital project recommendations for city improvements

BY WENDY STURGES

engineers and city staff to monitor sewer activity more closely and identify areas that could benefit from improvement projects. To date, the city’s model has helped identify issues on the north side of Belle Meade, the section of the city that has the most problems, Casey said. Public works officials said that area of the city is the one that gets the most calls for service. Public works employees also said while most residents likely are not affected, high water pressure in some areas is causing equipment to wear Cooper said in a statement. However, following a tornado that struck the region March 3 that caused widespread damage to the region, Cooper announced to Metro Nash- ville Council March 5 the plan will be revised and expanded to include additional funding to repair MNPS campuses damaged in the storm. “Here at the council, to respond to this challenge, this disaster, we will have to amend the capital spending plan that is before you tonight,” Cooper said. The city is also eligible for federal funding to aid with recovery follow- ing a March 3 state of emergency declaration, Cooper said. The new plan was included onMetro Council’s agenda for its March 17 meet- ing, which occurred after press time.

Projects for Metro Nashville include: • $4.6 million in matching funds to leverage federal and state grant funding for Metro Transit Authority • $12 million for two new police helicopters to phase out an aging fleet with safety concerns • $12.2 million for paving, sidewalks and roadways • $17.2 million to complete the sheriff’s headquarters; previous funding in 2017 appropriated $21 million, which was insufficient to complete construction, according to the mayor’s office • Funding for planning to replace two fire stations and the health department’s Woodbine Clinic as well as funding to create a new mounted patrol barn facility SOURCE: METRO NASHVILLE/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER out more quickly. Public Works Director Larry Smith said growth in the city since the 1980s has added a greater burden on the system. Should the city move forward with an improvement project on the north side of the city, which could include adding new pipelines parallel to existing pipes to relieve pressure, planning could begin as early as this summer, with construc- tion taking place in 2021, Casey said. Costs for proposed improvements have not been determined, accord- ing to the city.

BELLE MEADE The Belle Meade City Commission received a status update related to ongoing work to complete a digital model of the city’s sewer system during a Feb. 19 work session. Two of six sewer zones in the city now have modeling completed, according to Steve Casey, an engineer with Civil & Environmental Consul- tants who has been hired by the city to analyze the system and recom- mend improvements. Casey said the modeling allows METRONASHVILLE Ahead of the fiscal year 2020-21 budget deadlines scheduled for this spring, Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper has announced a list of project recommendations. In a Feb. 21 announcement, Cooper said his administration has compiled a smaller list than in the previous year, in light of the city’s ongoing budget issues. This list of recommen- dations, which includes projects for the city as well as for Metro Nashville Public Schools, totals $154 million, a 65% decrease in funding requests from the four-year average. “As we navigate difficult financial times, the city faces urgent needs that must be met in order to maintain basic services and public safety,” BY WENDY STURGES

City of BelleMeade continues sewermodeling, looks to identify projects

Nashville. 615-297-6041. www.citybellemeade.org

A weekend of Fine Art! Saturday, April 25 • 6pm - 9pm Cocktail Reception Complimentary Valet Parking • $15 Suggested Donation Sunday, April 26 • 10am - 4pm Free Admission

Gordon Jewish Community Center • 801 Percy Warner Blvd. • Nashville, TN 37205 615.356.7170 • www.nashvillejcc.org

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

NEIGHBORHOODNOTES

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Find recent community news, events and updates

BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

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Belmont University will construct an indoor practice facility for student athletes on Compton Avenue. (Rendering Courtesy Belmont University/ESA)

65

1

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100

Cheekwood Estate and Gardens announced eight new members for its board of trustees. (Dylan Skye Aycock/ Community Impact Newspaper)

5

recycled more than 50 tons of materials since the first event in 2012. 6 GREENHILLS The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee exceeds $1 billion in giving The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, a charitable foundation based in Green Hills, announced that it has given more than $1 billion to nonprofits in 40 counties throughout Middle Tennessee since its founding in 1991. Additionally, the foundation announced in November it had awarded $2,397,870 in grants to 365 organizations as part of its 2019 annual grant process. On March 11, the CFMT announced it had received more than $6.5 million in donations during the first week of tornado recovery efforts. 7 MIDTOWN Metro Nashville Council approves ordinance banning vaping at area hospitals At its March 5 meeting, Metro Nashville Council approved an ordinance on third reading that prohibits vaping on hospital grounds. The ordinance also allows Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Saint Thomas Health, Nashville General Hospital and Metro Department of Health to ban vaping within 200 feet of more than 25 facilities. The ordinance is sponsored by At-Large Council Members Burkley Allen, Sharon Hurt and Zulfat Suara as well as District 21 Council Member Brandon Taylor. In 2012, Metro Nashville approved an ordinance that prohibits tobacco smoking on the grounds of area hospitals.

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1 BELMONT-HILLSBORO Belmont University announces new indoor practice facility for student athletes Belmont University President Bob Fisher announced Jan. 22 the university’s plans to construct an indoor practice facility for student athletes on Compton Avenue in the Belmont- Hillsboro neighborhood. The facility, which is expected to be completed in fall 2021, will serve as a training space for men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball teams, according to a news release. Once constructed, the two-story building will feature two basketball and volleyball courts, strength and conditioning spaces, team lounge areas, offices for coaches and other amenities. University officials did not announce the cost of the facility. Watkins College of Art to move onto Belmont University At a Jan. 28 press conference, Belmont University officials announced that Watkins College of Art will relocate to Belmont’s campus beginning with the fall 2020 semester. Watkins College of Art’s property at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Blvd., Nashville, will be sold, with the proceeds to be used for an endowment to support scholarships for Watkins students, according to a news release. The boards of both universities unanimously approved the plan.

2 BELLEMEADE Belle Meade approves permit for 2020 St. George’s Farmers Market The Belle Meade Board of Commissioners approved a permit request for the annual St. George’s Farmers Market during its Feb. 19 meeting. The market, hosted at St. George’s Episcopal Church, located at 4715 Harding Road, Nashville, is open on Thursdays during the summer and offers produce, prepared foods and other goods for purchase. In compliance with Belle Meade’s restrictions on not having commercial businesses in the city limits, the market is 100% nonprofit and donates all proceeds to charitable organizations. The market is slated to open in May. 3 CHEEKWOOD Cheekwood names eight new board members Cheekwood Estate and Gardens added eight new members to its board of trustees, according to a Feb. 17 announcement from the art museum and botanical gardens. The new trustees that join the other standing members are: Martin Brown Jr., Katie Crumbo, Mike D. Johnson, Robert M. Keith Jr., Lisa Kranc, Robert Lipman, Emilio Pardo and Ronald Roberts. In addition to the new board trustees, three standing members were named officers for 2020-21: Chairperson Lisa

Z. Manning, Vice Chairperson Barry Stowe and Treasurer Russell Bates. This year marks the 60th anniversary of Cheekwood as a public institution. 4 EDGEHILL Historical marker planned for E. S. Rose park in Edgehill Metro Nashville Parks and Recreation approved a new marker for E. S. Rose Park in Edgehill at its Jan. 7 meeting. The marker, requested by former District 17 Council Member Ronnie Greer, will honor twelve men from Nashville who played in the Negro Baseball League. The marker will be located near the entrance of the park’s baseball facility this spring, according to the board. 5 FOREST HILLS City of Forest Hills to relocate biannual community recycle event The city of Forest Hills will host its biannual recycling event at Hillsboro Church of Christ, 5800 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville, according to city officials. The rain-or-shine event, which is only open to residents of Forest Hills, is set for 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. April 18. Residents are encouraged to recycle items, such as batteries, bulbs, electronics, medications, mattresses, large appliances and more. Items not accepted include rugs, paint, Styrofoam, scrap wood and vehicle tires and fluids. The city has

9

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MARCH 2020

GUIDE

Data, resources for local seniors

1 Alive Hospice Residence Nashville 1710 Patterson St., Nashville 615-963-4800 www.alivehospice.org As part of Alive Hospice, a nonprofit organization specializing in end-of- life care, this 30-bed facility provides residential, general inpatient and respite hospice services. 2 Belmont Village Green Hills 4206 Stammer Place, Nashville 615-279-9100 www.belmontvillage.com Belmont Village offers various services, such as diabetes management; fitness programs; and physical, speech and occupational therapies. 3 Blakeford at Green Hills www.blakeford.com/blakeford-at-green-hills In addition to in-home services, Blakeford provides three on-site senior living programs with different levels of services based on the needs of each resident. 4 Brookdale Belle Meade 6767 Brookmont Terrace, Nashville 615-219-5121 www.brookdale.com Brookdale offers more than 20 amenities, including a fitness center, an arts and crafts studio, a community kitchen and more. 5 Brookdale Green Hills Cumberland 15 Burton Hills Blvd., Nashville 615-219-5098 www.brookdale.com Much like Brookdale’s community in Belle Meade, the location in Green Hills offers additional amenities, such as a greenhouse, a library, outdoor sports activities and more. 6 Green Hills Center for Rehabilitation and Healing 3939 Hillsboro Circle, Nashville 615-297-2100 www.greenhillscenterrehab.com Burton Court at Blakeford Woodcrest at Blakeford 11 Burton Hills Blvd., Nashville 615-510-6374

Along with 24/7 skilled nursing care, this facility offers short- and long-term orthopedic rehabilitation therapy. 7 Leah Rose Residence for Senior Citizens 1900 Acklen Ave., Nashville 615-298-2634 www.leahroseresidence.com This residence works with local groups to provide programs, such as educational seminars, volunteer opportunities, weekly trips to grocery stores and more. 8 Mary, Queen of Angels 34 White Bridge Pike, Nashville 615-353-6181 www.maryqueenofangels.com Mary, Queen of Angels is a faith-centered assisted-living community near Belle Meade. The community offers personal and memory care services as well as access to daily mass and weekly programs for residents of all faiths. The community helps with daily activities, such as transportation, personal care and more. 10 Nashville Center for Rehabilitation and Healing 832 Wedgewood Ave., Nashville 615-806-8800 www.nashvillecenterrehab.com This center offers 24/7 skilled nursing as well as cardiac, orthopedic and pulmonary rehabilitation services. 11 Park Manor Apartments 115 Woodmont Blvd., Nashville 615-549-5214 www.parkmanorapts.com www.abesgarden.org Park Manor Apartments offers assisted- and independent-living services and shares a 7-acre campus with memory care center Abe’s Garden. 12 Richland Place 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville 615-269-4200 9 Morningside of Belmont 1710 Magnolia Blvd., Nashville 615-383-2557 www.fivestarseniorliving.com

GUIDE TO SENIOR LIVING As the number of senior adults nationwide and in the Southwest Nashville area continues to grow, so does demand for residential options. The following list is not comprehensive.

DEFINITIONS/KEY

Independent - living communities

Hospice care is intended to relieve symptoms and suffering associated with a terminal illness in those who have been given six months or less to live. facilities provide care to those with illnesses or mental conditions requiring full-time monitoring and medical care. The patient must choose to forgo further curative treatment. Mixed - use facilities offer some or all of these services. Nursing home/skilled nursing

cater to older adults with limited care needs. Most include amenities, such as fitness programs, housekeeping, communal meals and more. Assisted - living communities specialize in providing care and supervision. These facilities frequently offer a full range of amenities as well as limited medical assistance. Memory care facilities specialize in providing care to seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive issues. Staff members are trained to help residents manage these diseases.

SOURCE:WWW.AARP.ORG/ COMMUNITY IMPACTNEWSPAPER

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WHITE BRIDGE PIKE

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ACKLEN AVE.

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MAGNOLIA BLVD.

31

ELMINGTON AVE.

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PARK MANOR BLVD.

HILLSBORO CIR.

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Register a team at www.movingdaynashville.org Or call Amanda Spiehler at 615-338-5948 or email aspiehler@parkinson.org

Centennial Park 200 West End Ave, Nashville, TN 32203 Activities Begin: 9:00 a.m. We Move Ceremony & Walk: 10:00 a.m. Moving Day Nashville Saturday, June 6, 2020 We Care. We Fight. We Move. To Beat Parkinson’s.

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

www.richlandplace.com This senior living community provides different levels of services based on the needs of each resident, ranging from active seniors age 55 or older to residents who need 24/7 access to care. 13 The St. Paul Senior Living Community 5031 Hillsboro Pike, Nashville 615-298-2400 www.thesaintpaul.com hairdressers and more. 14 Villa Maria Manor 32 White Bridge Pike, Nashville 615-352-3084 www.villamariamanor.org Amenities available at St. Paul include transportation, weekly exercise classes, an art studio, in-house barbers and Villa Maria Manor offers housekeeping and transportation services as well as on- site amenities, such as a library, a beauty shop and more. 15 West Meade Place 1000 St. Luke Drive, Nashville 615-352-3430 www.westmeadeplace.com Along with rehabilitation services, this center offers skilled nursing and long- term care programs.

DEMOGRAPHICS

EDUCATION

Age 65 and older:

11.7%

67,976

85.1% of seniors

or

15.7% 14.9%

in Davidson County have a high school education.

684,017 Total population:

Age 65 and older:

79,891

Davidson County*

25,463

Tennessee* Nationwide* *AS OF 2018, THE MOST RECENT DATA AVAILABLE

or 31.9% of seniors in Davidson County have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SENIOR POPULATION INCREASES The number of seniors is increasing nationally and statewide. Here is how the senior population has changed in Davidson County since 2014.

LIFE EXPECTANCY

DAVIDSON COUNTY 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 2014

Female Male

The average U.S. life expectancy rose from

68 years

79 years

in 1950

to

in 2013.

PROJECTION

For the first time in U.S. history, in 2035, the number of people age 65 and older will outnumber those age 18 and younger.

2015

2016

2017

2018

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11

SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION

“FINDING THE PIECES AND SALVAGING

THEM ISWHAT REALLYKEEPS US GOING.” JULIA PETROVA, OWNER

BUSINESS FEATURE

Preservation Station co-owner Julia Petrova said she fell in love with salvaging antiques after a stint remodeling houses in East Nashville. (Photos by Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

Preservation Station Business seeks to save Nashville history A aron Hetrick and Julia Petrova, owners of Preserva- tion Station on 8th Avenue BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

SALVAGE YOUR STUFF Preservation Station has partnered with the Metro Historical Commission Foundation, a friends group that supports the mission of the Metro Historical Commission, to accept donations of salvaged materials, which generate funds for the nonprot.

loved doing this so much more than restoring houses, so we just kept adding more and more things until we needed more space.” Two years later, the couple relocated the business further up 8th Avenue South to a larger building. At Preservation Station, which is now a shopping hub for architects, builders and homeowners, cus- tomers will nd everything from chandeliers, stained glass windows and interior and exterior doors to doorknobs, replaces and clawfoot tubs, all restored and rewired in the store’s on-site workshop. “Finding the pieces and salvaging them is what really keeps us going,” Petrova said. In August, Preservation Station partnered with Vanderbilt University to salvage antique materials from the Manuel House, a home built in 1910 and later purchased by fashion designer Manuel Cuevas, who styled Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Dolly Par- ton and other artists. Proceeds from the items were donated to the Metro Historical Commission Foundation. “The Manuel House was one of the last great mansions left in downtown Nashville,” Petrova said. “Even though it couldn’t be saved, it feels good to know we could salvage a part of its history.”

STEP 1 Contact the Metro Historical Commission Foundation at 615-862-7970 to let them know you are interested in donating items for salvage. STEP 2 The MHCF will schedule an appointment to view the items. If the donated items are accepted, the nonprot will sell the salvageable goods to Preservation Station. STEP 3 The MHCF will produce a charitable receipt for the donated items. STEP 4 Contact Preservation Station to arrange a time to transfer the items.

South, got into the architectural sal- vage business after stints as landlords and home remodelers. “East Nashville had already gone through the urban renewal process decades earlier, and many of the houses we purchased had been turned into duplexes and triplexes,” Petrova said. “By the time we got our hands on them, the original mantels and doors had either been completely removed or covered up. The charac- ter was just gone.” As the couple continued to purchase and restore homes, Petrova said they spent their free time travel- ing in the U.S. and Europe in search of original architectural items, such as doors, windows and light xtures, to use for remodeling. In 2003, Hetrick and Petrova opened Preservation Station as a way to sell the extra inventory they had collected over the years. Before then, Petrova said, items would just pile up in their home basement until they were needed for projects. “We only opened [Preservation Station] as a way to sell o what we had at the time, which was a lot,” Petrova said. “It turned out we

The shop features hundreds of doorknobs from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Preservation Station is located on 8th Avenue South.

Preservation Station 1809 8th Ave. S., Nashville 615-292-3595 www.thepreservationstation.com Hours: Tue.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Sun.-Mon.

WEDGEWOOD AVE.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

DINING FEATURE

RISE AND SHINE With locations in Green Hills, Brentwood and Franklin, The Perch oers a selection of French crepes available with both sweet and savory lling options. The eatery also serves breakfast and lunch items as well as handcrafted coee and espresso drinks.

This crepe is topped with chorizo and salsa verde. ($8.50)

Zach Hall, general manager of the location in Green Hills, has been with The Perch for more than ve years and said the eatery strives to be a positive workplace. (Photos by Dylan Skye Aycock/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Perch Green Hills creperie, coee shop strives for quality service W hen Preeti Patel and her husband rst moved to the Nashville area two years ago, she said she set out to nd a reliable BY DYLAN SKYE AYCOCK

The restaurant’s Nutella crepe is lled with the hazelnut spread and topped with chocolate sauce and powdered sugar. ($6)

talking to everyone.” As the new owner, Patel said she wants to build on the success created by former owners John Kressaty and Heather Chandler, who opened the rst location in Brentwood in 2008. In addition to the restaurant’s current menu lineup of coee, crepes, breakfast sandwiches and Belgian waes, Patel said one of her main initiatives is to add a new slate of grab-and-go

coee shop. She said it was important for the shop to have great service, friendly baristas and, above all, delicious coee. “I wanted to nd the perfect coeehouse that feels

like home when you walk in the door,” Patel said. “The Perch is the rst place we ate at when we moved here, and I was sold on the whole concept.” For the next two years, stopping at The Perch for a cup of coee became a part of her daily routine. From her go-to latte order to the restaurant’s signature sweet and savory crepes, Patel said she was eager to try everything on the menu. However, when the previous

items for busy customers. “At its core, The Perch is a coee and creperie shop, and we don’t want tomess with something that works really well,” Patel said. “If you want to sit down and enjoy your meal, a crepe is great for that, but we also want customers in a rush to have options, too.” Whether it is creating new food items or new beverage creations, Zach Hall, general manager of the Green Hills loca-

“IFWE CANHELP MAKE SOMEONE’S DAYWITHAGREAT CUPOF COFFEE,

The Portuguese Mun ($5.75) features an English mun with bacon, Vermont cheddar and egg.

THAT’SWHAT WEWANT TO STRIVE TODO." PREETI PATEL, OWNER

The Perch 2002 Richard Jones Road, Nashville 615-712-8787 www.theperchtn.com Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

owners expressed interest in selling the restaurant last fall, Patel said she made a swift career change and transitioned frombeing one of the restaurant’s most loyal customers to being the proprietor of all three locations in Green Hills, Franklin and Brentwood. “I was already friends with the baristas before I took over ownership—that’s how connected I felt to the business—so the whole process felt really natural,” Patel said. “I was that one customer who would hold up the line because I was so busy

tion, said the company’s success is in large part due to its employees. After more than ve years with the The Perch, Hall said the location’s baristas and chefs have all been with the company for more than a year. “As a small-business owner, if you can keep your employees in an industry where there’s a lot of turnover, I think that says a lot about the business,” Patel said. “If we can help make someone’s day with a great cup of coee, that’s what we want to strive to do.”

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SOUTHWEST NASHVILLE EDITION • MARCH 2020

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