Frisco November 2020

AN INSIDE look Main Street Food Hall will hold 10,000 square feet of space over two ! oors. Here is what each ! oor will have to o " er: COMPILED BY ELIZABETH UCL É S % DESIGNED BY CHELSEA PETERS

FOOD VENDORS

RESTROOMS

DINING AREA

SPORTS BAR

FOOD VENDORS

SPORTS BAR

The food hall spans two ! oors, each of which will have a bar.

DINING AREA

DINING AREA

RESTROOMS

FOOD VENDORS

SECOND floor

floor

FIRST

The # rst ! oor will feature a bar; 30 TVs broadcasting local sports; and 10 restaurant vendors, including a french fries-focused concept and the fast-casual restaurant Fatburger. Pizza and dessert restaurants are under consideration.

The second ! oor will hold an upscale sports bar that can host Sunday brunch and shift into an acoustic space for small music acts in the evenings.

The back of the food hall near the Frisco Fresh Market will house a beer garden.

SOURCE: THE TASTE BUDS GROUP $ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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THE APP Main Street Food Hall will have a mobile app developed by The Taste Buds Group and a third-party vendor to facilitate in-person and takeout orders. Here is how it will work.

“It creates a communal eating experience,” Daniels said. “It’s just the diversi ! cation of cuisine and the opportunity to experiment and dis- cover new things.” Frisco Mayor Je " Cheney said the project will be “a big win for the city” and that it will tie the downtown, Frisco Square and The Rail District areas into one large entertainment district. “It’s great for Frisco to start having ribbon-cuttings again,” Cheney said. What’s coming About 10,000 square feet of space over two # oors will hold 10 total restaurant vendors and a bar on each # oor. Compared to the ! rst- # oor bar, the second- # oor bar will be more of an upscale sports bar that can host brunch or transform into an acoustic space for small music acts, Farr said. Selected vendors include fast-ca- sual restaurant Fatburger and a french fries-based concept by The Taste Buds Group, said Curtis Croft, the group’s CEO. Pizza and dessert vendors are also in the works for the food hall. Farr said Main Street Food Hall plans to feature “unique” and “eclec- tic” restaurants. “We don’t want large menus,” Farr said. “We want people who do very few things very, very well.” The food hall’s o " erings will also extend to the outdoors. A beer gar- den with a capacity of 250 people

Dine-in • Guests order from any vendor from their table • Guests without the app can scan a QR code and view a website for ordering • Food is brought to the table • Food can be ordered from anywhere in the food hall, including the bars and beer garden Takeout • Guests order food on the website or the app • Guests can pick up food inside the food hall’s takeout center • Guests can also park in designated to-go spaces and have their order brought out • Third-party delivery platforms can deliver food to guests SOURCE: THE TASTE BUDS GROUP $ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

will be located on the north end of the facility. The beer garden will also serve as a music venue for smaller acts, and a 1.5-acre lot on the west side of the food hall will hold a stage for larger performances. These outdoor spaces will be able to facilitate concerts and festivals, Farr said, and an event team for bookings will be based at the food hall. “We want the community to be proud to have this space, to make it like it’s their own,” Farr said. Adding to the trend Main Street Food Hall is the lat- est such operation in the Dallas-Fort Worth area; it joins Legacy Food Hall in Plano, Urban8 Food Court in The Colony, Dining Hall West in Richard- son, Oak St Food & Brew in Roanoke and the soon-to-open Harvest Hall in Grapevine. Bringing a food hall to Frisco is likely to keep residents from leaving the city to dine out, Cheney said. “We’ve talked for a long time as a council [about] really trying to develop experiences,” he said. “And these food hall concepts are

The west side of the food hall’s property will be used for larger live music acts.

PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH UCLÉS $ COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

food halls are attractive to real estate brokers and chefs alike, as they typi- cally have fewer operating expenses than traditional restaurants and o " er a versatile dining environment. However, Main Street Food Hall will not mirror the typical, 35,000-square-foot-plus, multi- ple- # oor venues that have become popular in the metroplex, Farr said. Its comparatively smaller size will be “very intimate” and family-friendly, he said. The smaller square footage will also give vendors more exposure, Croft said. “We’re going to be working with some people to develop their own restaurant concepts,” he said. Cheney said he believes Main Street Food Hall will serve as a “restaurant incubator” to launch new restaurants. “I think it’s going to create a really great opportunity for so many smaller restaurateurs to test their concepts,” he said.

becoming very popular destination experiences where it’s a di " erent look at dining.” Consulting ! rm Cushman & Wake- ! eld released a report in May, and con ! rmed in October that there are an estimated 237 food hall concepts in the United States, with another 175 in development. A 2019 report from the ! rm said

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