Keller - Roanoke - Northeast Fort Worth Edition | Oct. 2020

KELLER ROANOKE NORTHEAST FORTWORTH EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 6  OCT. 22NOV. 18, 2020

ONLINE AT

Tightening the strings City ocials stay conservative with scal year 202021 budget

Keller FY 2020-21 operating budget: $ 86.5 million

Roanoke FY 2020-21 operating budget: $ 21.7 million

Fort Worth FY 2020-21 general fund budget: $ 782 million

No. 1 general fund priority:

No. 4 general fund priority:

No. 1 general fund priority:

BY IAN PRIBANIC

Police and Fire $ 19.5 million 22.8% of operating budget

Roads and streets $2.5 million 11.5% of operating budget

Crime Control and Prevention District

Like many businesses and families in the area, ocials with the cities of Fort Worth, Keller and Roanoke have sought solutions to decrease spend- ing amid nancial uncertainty as a result of the coro- navirus pandemic. In scal year 2020-21, which began Oct. 1 and lasts through September, the average operating budgets for each of the three cities will decrease by nearly 0.5% from FY 2019-20. The city of Keller will see the largest year-over-year dierence, at -4.3%.

$86.5 million 11.1% of general fund

• Rusk Street construction • Austin Street construction • Downtown street overlay work

• Additional animal control ocer • Live-scan ngerprint system • Replacement patrol vehicles

• Vehicle replacement • School resource ocers • Neighborhood patrol programs

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SOURCES: CITY OF KELLER, CITY OF ROANOKE, CITY OF FORT WORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

BY SANDRA SADEK AND IAN PRIBANIC

Early voting underway in Tarrant County Wait times in Keller averaged above three hours on the rst day of early voting as a result of limited poll workers and non-functioning votingmachines. (Ian Pribanic/Community Impact Newspaper)

Early voting in Texas kicked o Oct. 13 as voters headed to the polls to cast their ballot for federal, state and local candi- dates. Despite the pandemic, people are turning up at the polls in record numbers. According to the Tarrant County elections website, CONTINUED ON 13

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATION Litsey Road speed limit change CITY& COUNTY

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Ana Erwin, aerwin@communityimpact.com EDITOR Ian Pribanic REPORTER Sandra Sadek GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ellen Jackson ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Arlin Gold

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FROMANA: 2020 has not been short on challenges in our industry, but as a privately owned, family-owned business whose main goal is to provide unbiased, hyperlocal news to the local communities, we know that growing our investment of quality journalists on our team is pivotal for our future. This is why we hired an additional reporter to cover the thriving Northeast Tarrant County community. Please help me welcome Sandra Sadek to the team. She comes to us as a recent graduate of Texas State University with a great deal of experience covering local communities through various internships and freelancing and as the news editor of her college newspaper, The University Star . Sandra has hit the ground running and has enjoyed meeting many of you. If you have any story ideas or if you simply want to welcome her, you can reach her by email at ssadek@communityimpact.com. Ana Erwin, GENERALMANAGER

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Latest local news

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Christal Howard MANAGING EDITOR Valerie Wigglesworth ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Breanna Flores CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today, we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE Newspaper’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving. COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON CONTACT US 7460 Warren Parkway, Ste. 160 Frisco, TX 75034 • 2146189001 PRESS RELEASES KRNnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher. Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

LOCAL GETAWAY GUIDE 9 Plan the perfect day trip using this local getaway guide that highlights attractions in Tarrant County and nearby areas. BUSINESS FEATURE 14 Kraken Motorsports

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

Local sources 15

New businesses 6

Local getaways 7

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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5.11 Tactical

Super Fort Wars

IAN PRIBANIC/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY SUPER FORT WARS

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Great Harvest Bread Co.

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COURTESY GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO.

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3 Alliance Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery opened a location at 9415 N. Beach St., Fort Worth, in July. The Beach Street location offers a wide range of sur- gical services that focus on the teeth and jaws, including wisdom tooth extraction and dental implants. Locations are currently open for full service, and face masks are required in the office. 817-741-2200. www.dfworalsurgery.com 4 5.11 Tactical officially opened a North Fort Worth location in August at 9329 North Freeway, Fort Worth. The store offers a wide selection of tactical gear, including boots, belts, flashlights, gun holsters and tactical knives. 682-291-0085. www.511tactical.com 5 PetSuites opened a new location Oct. 13 at 8496 N. Riverside Drive, Fort Worth. The business offers pet boarding and day care services for dogs and cats as well as grooming and training services for dogs, though only in select locations. As part of their grand opening, PetSuites is offering free boarding and day care for two weeks, from Oct. 26 to Nov. 8.

817-779-7141. www.alliance. petsuitesofamerica.com COMING SOON

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6 A Goodwill thrift store is under con- struction at 3200 Basswood Blvd., Fort Worth. The 14,000-square-foot store is expected to be completed in January. Goodwill thrift stores operate under a nonprofit model that supports communi- ty-based programs. www.goodwill.org 7 Great Harvest Bread Co. will open a second Fort Worth location this fall at 9409 Sage Meadow Trail, Ste. 100, Fort Worth. Great Harvest bakeries offer fresh bread made daily, catering options and a cafe menu with selections such as sand- wiches, melts and specialty toast. 682-708-7228. www.funkytownbread.com 8 Advance Care Medical will open a surgical outpatient facility at 1220 Keller Parkway, Keller, as early as late 2020. Ac- cording to personnel, the Keller location will perform a wide range of surgeries, including those for orthopedic, cardio-

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 A La-Z-Boy Home Furnishings store opened in July at 9461 North Freeway, Fort Worth. The store offers a wide selection of sofas, recliners, loveseats and sectionals. All La-Z-Boy locations are following state health guidelines and requiring face masks in stores. 817-918-4326. www.la-z-boy.com 820

2 Super Fort Wars opened its doors to Keller and Fort Worth residents in July, offering customers the ultimate fort building and Nerf war experience. Locat- ed at 10379 Alta Vista Road, Ste. 211, the business has events for all ages, from as young as 2 years old up to teenagers and adults. They also host birthday parties. All events are by appointment, which can be scheduled on their website. 972-841-6219. www.superfortwars.com

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC & SANDRA SADEK

www.advancedveincare.net 817-488-5170 Impre yr quality of life today!

Wesco Aircraft Hardware Corp. is relocating its headquarters to Fort Worth.

COURTESY CITY OF FORT WORTH

logical, vascular, urological, and ear, nose and throat conditions. 9 A Jamba Juice location is expected to open in late 2020 at 5305 Golden Trian- gle Blvd., Fort Worth. Jamba Juice stores feature classic fruit smoothies, yogurt bowls, flatbread sandwiches and more. 866-473-7848. www.jamba.com 10 Altus Group , a tax consultant firm, is currently building a new headquarters at 1807 Keller Parkway, Keller, near event venue The Bowden. The development is expected to open in summer 2021 and will consist of a 4,000-square-foot medical building and a 16,000-square-foot gener- al office building with up to 70 workers. 817-251-6666. www.altusgroup.com 11 A QuikTrip gas station is under construction at 13400 North Freeway, Fort Worth, with an anticipated opening of early 2021. The convenience store chain offers multiple refueling options along with sandwiches, wraps, salads and various pastries that are made daily at an in-store bakery. www.quiktrip.com RELOCATIONS 12 Custom furniture store Design a Sofa relocated to 3529 Heritage Trace Parkway, Fort Worth, in August. The store offers more than 200 styles of custom sofas and sectionals that are handmade in FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS Wesco Aircraft Hardware Corp., currently known as Incora, will relocate its headquarters from California to Texas, bringing with it a $6 million capital investment and up to 239 jobs, according to an announcement made by Gov. Greg Abbott in September. “It is exciting to see Wesco Aircraft, an existing Fort Worth company, expand and invest in our community,” Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price said. “Wesco Aircraft’s new location not only will bring more jobs to Fort Worth, but it also positions the company for continued success and future growth.” Wesco is one of the largest aerospace supply chain service companies in the world. It specializes in procurement, warehouse management, logistics and on-site customer services. As a result

of the relocation, Wesco will receive a $1.8 million grant from the Texas Enterprise Fund, the announcement said. According to Incora CEO Todd Renehan, the larger oce space will allow the company to increase eciency, encourage collaboration and support future growth. A centralized location will provide more access to clients in the U.S. and Europe, he said. 4250 Dale Earnhardt Way, Northlake, TX 76262

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the U.S. 817-501-6658. www.designasofadfw.com 13 The Metroport Chamber of

Commerce officially relocated its main operations building to 381 W. Byron Nelson Blvd., Roanoke, in September. The newly constructed two-story building will house offices for the chamber as well as co-working space that is available for lease. 817-837-1000.

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14 Caminito Spanish Immersion and Montessori School in Keller is under new ownership as of September. The school, located at 252 S. Elm St., Keller is a Span- ish language immersion school that offers traditional and Montessori approaches to early childhood education. 817-627-8727. www.caminitospanishschool.com CLOSINGS 15 Bosses Pizza, Wings & Burgers , located at 201 N. Main St., Keller, closed on Oct. 5. The restaurant served a large selection of sandwiches, burgers and specialty pizzas. There is an additional Bosses Pizza location in the North Fort Worth area at 2740 Western Center Blvd., Ste. 258, Fort Worth. 817-847-5500. www.bossespizza.com

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

Dr. Robert Schmidt

Dr. Ajai Cadambi

Dr. Theodore Crofford

Dr. Daniel Wagner

ONGOING PROJECTS

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC

Dr. Steven Weeden

Dr. Steven Ogden

Dr. Jeffrey McGowen

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The I35W on-ramp near Eagle Parkway closed in October. (Ian Pribanic/ Community Impact Newspaper)

Litsey Road speed limit change Area residents can look forward to a speed limit increase along Litsey Road from the Fort Worth and Roanoke city limits west to North Beach Street. Fort Worth City Council approved an ordi- nance to adopt a speed increase from 30 miles per hour to 35 miles per hour. According to the ordinance, Fort Worth and Roanoke ocials are working to “bal- ance multimodal transportation safety and maintain access for industrial uses along the corridor.” The city of Fort Worth’s thoroughfare plan designates the portion of Litsey Road from Cleveland Gibbs Road west to North Beach as a “commercial connector” and Litsey from Cleveland Gibbs east to the Roanoke city limits as a “neighbor- hood connector.” Timeline: fourth quarter of 2020

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North Tarrant Express closures As part of the $950 million North Tarrant Express project, multiple long-term ramp closures went into eect in North Fort Worth on Sept. 15 and are set to last through the end of fall 2021. Among the closures were the on-ramp to southbound I-35W south of the Eagle Parkway exit. The closure is also aecting the I-35W o-ramp at the southbound Westport Parkway exit. In both cases, trac needing to access exits aected by the closure is being redirected to available entrance and exit points at Alliance Boulevard. Project ocials announced Oct. 9 that the construction has ocially begun on the much-anticipated 3C Segment of the NTE project. The nal segment will run from North Tarrant Parkway to Eagle Parkway and cost $2.6 billion. Once complete, that section of I-35W will have redone main lanes, expanded frontage roads and two TEXpress managed toll lanes in both directions. Timeline: September 2020-2021 Cost: $950 million Funding source: NTE Mobility Partners

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Fossil Creek Boulevard repaving Fort Worth City Council approved $1.3 million in brick and concrete pavement repairs to Fossil Creek Boulevard in North Fort Worth. More than 1.3 miles of Fossil Creek Bou- levard from North Beach Street to I-35W will undergo rehabilitation due to the “deteriorated condition” of the roadway. According to the ordinance, the project is a rst step “towards the total cost of rehabilitating Fossil Creek Boulevard in scal year [2020-21].” Timeline: September 2020-2021 Cost: $1.3 million Funding source: city of Fort Worth

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Fort Worth, Roanoke & Tarrant County

COMPILED BY IAN PRIBANIC AND SANDRA SADEK

DATE TOKNOW

FortWorth Stock Showcanceled

WHAT’S AT STAKE

Oct. 14

Tarrant County Judge Glen

Whitley announced Oct. 12 that bars within the county could reopen at 50% capacity beginning Oct. 14 in line with Gov. Greg Abbott’s order. According to Abbott’s order, qualifying counties must have a COVID-19 hospitalization rate under 15%. Tarrant County’s hospitalization rate was 11% as of Oct. 12. Fort Worth City Council Meets at 7 p.m. three times each month on Tuesdays. www.fortworthtexas.gov Keller City Council Meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. www.roanoketexas.com Keller ISD Meets monthly; dates, times and locations may vary. www.kellerisd.net Northwest ISD Meets monthly at 6:30 p.m.; dates may vary. www.nisdtx.org www.cityofkeller.com Roanoke City Council MEETINGSWE COVER

Originally scheduled for Jan. 15-Feb. 6, the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo will not be held in 2021. Executive committee members voted to cancel the show after consulting with infectious disease experts and public health profession- als. According to an organizational release, the stock show and rodeo draws more than 1.2 million guests annually and would create a high risk for further community spread of COVID-19.

“[This] decision ... was not made lightly,” FWSSR President Brad Barnes said in the release. “The chal- lenges we face to create practical and enforceable protocols and procedures to comply with COVID-19 guidelines … are extremely daunting.” The FWSSR has been canceled only once before: in 1943, as a result of World War II. As Fort Worth’s oldest, largest event, the show also has a responsibility to help end the pandemic, Barnes said.

The potential spread of COVID-19 prompted officials to cancel the annual rodeo and stock show event.

Officials projected crowds exceeding 140,000 people per day over 23 days

More than 30,000 animals are exhibited at the stock show.

SOURCE: FWSSR/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Pandemic delays PeabodyHotel

The Peabody Hotel’s master plan agreement, finalized in May 2019, set construction to begin by April 1, 2020, with a required completion date of April 1, 2022. However, the unexpected COVID-19 pandemic has delayed the project’s schedule, Roanoke City Manager Scott Campbell said. “Our hope is the next fewmonths

will paint a clearer picture on how things will shake out in the market, and we can then begin to identify a more realistic schedule for moving forward,” Campbell said. The most recent extension pushed the start date to Aug. 1, 2020, but Campbell said they will have to push it back again.

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KELLER - ROANOKE - NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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We are excited to announce our new and extended list of Christmas events taking place as part of Roanoke’s 1st Annual Hometown Holiday! There are plenty of fun opportunities that will bring your friends and family an abundance of holiday cheer! SCHEDUL E OF EVENTS TREES OF THE SEASON Christmas tree lot November 27 - December 13 ROANOKE’S HOMETOWN HOLIDAY Festival, tree lighting & parade December 5 VIP PROGRESSIVE DINNER WITH SANTA* Travel down Oak Street and sip & savor culinary delights December 10 FIRST RESPONDER’S BREAKFAST WITH SANTA* SHOP SMALL GIFT TOUR* Sip, Snack & Shop with Roanoke’s businesses November 28 UGLY SWEATER CONTEST Pop in City Hall or Send a Selfie November 15 - December 13

Bring the family for a breakfast & musical show with Roanoke’s

GINGERBREAD HOUSE BUILDING CONTEST* Build your masterpiece & let your inner artist flow December 5

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

GUIDE

A noncomprehensive guide to attractions in the Dallas-Fort Worth area

COMPILED BY SANDRA SADEK

GETAWAYS LOCAL Looking for something to do? Here are some attractions to check out in Tarrant County and other nearby areas.

Colorful owers, water features and more are on display at the Dallas Arboretum.

ELIZABETH UCLÉSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WORTH THE TRIP Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden Located along White Rock Lake, the arbo- retum and botanical garden spans 66 acres and features a variety of gardens, including a walkway enclosed by crape myrtle trees and a rose garden with over 200 hybrid tea roses of 16 varieties. The arboretum also hosts various events and activities to t the changing seasons. SEA LIFE Aquarium, LEGOLAND Discovery Center, The Escape Room, Round 1 Bowling and Amusement and Peppa Pig World of Play. 3000 Grapevine Mills PKWY., Grapevine 4694443050 www.simon.com/mall/grapevine-mills/stores Bonton Farms Bonton Farms grows organic food on a 40- acre urban farm south of Dallas. It also houses free-range chickens, goats, turkeys, rabbits and beehives that provide fresh eggs, milk and honey. Guests can eat at the restaurant and visit the on-site farmers market for fresh food, produce, local goods and arts and crafts. Reg- ular events, including farm-to-table dinners and live music, are also held. Mon.-Sat. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., closed Sun.

8525 Garland Road, Dallas 2145156615 | www.dallasarboretum.org $12-$17

Texas Motor Speedway

Museum of the American Railroad

IAN PRIBANICCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

COURTESY MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN RAILROAD

LOCAL The Unique Dining Capital of Texas Head to Roanoke for more than 60 original restaurants, as well as shops, breweries, music venues and more. Start at City Hall in charming downtown Roanoke and take a stroll down Oak Street where diners can choose fromwell-known restaurants, bakeries, wine bars and other popular venues. 8174912411 www.roanoketexas.com/116/ Unique-Dining-Capital Texas Motor Speedway Texas Motor Speedway’s 1.5-mile track hosts IndyCar, NASCAR Cup, Xnity and Gander RV & Outdoors Truck series races. The speed- way also has a charity “to care for children in educational, nancial, social and medical need in order to help them lead productive lives.” Tickets for monthly events can be purchased on its website. 3545 Lone Star Circle Fort Worth

8172158500 | www.texasmotorspeedway.com $30-$750 Fort Worth Cultural District The Fort Worth Cultural District features art ex- hibitions, from antiquities to modern artworks. The district contains six museums and plenty of dining options. Events are held throughout the year and a list can be found on the city’s page. Visit each museum’s individual site for ticket prices. Located near Camp Bowie Boulevard and West Lancaster Avenue Fort Worth www.fortworth.com/about/neighbor- hoods-districts/cultural-district/ REGIONAL SEA LIFE Aquarium, Legoland and Peppa Pig World of Play at Grapevine Mills Grapevine Mills indoor mall oers 180 places for shopping and dining as well as several entertainment venues. Attractions include

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6915 Bexar St., Dallas 9729822245 | www.bontonfarms.org Free to visit Museum of the American Railroad The railroad museum holds a collection of steam, diesel, passenger and freight railroad equipment and oers guided tours to guests. A TrainTopia exhibit showcases a G-scale model view of trains traveling through 2,500 square feet of the American Southwest that begins at the 1960s Dallas Union Station. 8004 N. Dallas Parkway, Ste. 400, Frisco 2144280101 www.museumoftheamericanrailroad.org $5-$15

Find more or submit Keller, Roanoke, and Northeast Forth Worth events at communityimpact.com/event-calendar. Event organizers can submit local events online to be considered for the print edition. Submitting details for consideration does not guarantee publication.

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

Getting ahead of the market

Keller*

Roanoke

Fort Worth*

Peak sales tax revenue: $ 18,206,173.28

$20M

Monthly sales tax allocations for Keller, Roanoke and Fort Worth helped city ocials shape budgets for FY 2020-21, which began Oct. 1. Sales tax allocations generally reect

Lowest sales tax revenue: $ 11,555,104.41

City ocials are taking a conservative approach to budgeting due to uctuations in sales tax revenue during the COVID-19 pandemic.

purchases from two months prior. *CRIME CONTROL AND PREVENTION DISTRICT TAXES NOT INCLUDED IN SALES TAX DATA

$15M

Peak sales tax revenue: $ 1,742,155.69

Keller

Roanoke Fort Worth

Peak sales tax revenue: $ 1,314,227.80

FY 2019-20 budget

FY 2020-21 budget

Lowest sales tax revenue: $ 1,104,373.74

total budget decrease -4.3% $ 86.5M $ 90.4M

Lowest sales tax revenue:

$2M $10M

$ 799,155.23

total budget increase +1.62% $ 21.7M $ 21.35M general fund increase +1.3% $ 782M $ 772M

$1.5M

$1M

$.5M

0

SOURCES: TEXAS COMPTROLLER’S OFFICE, CITY OF KELLER, CITY OF ROANOKE, CITY OF FORT WORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2020

Works additional time to t the project within its schedule, Rector said. “City Council wanted to con- tinue the same level of services and continue lowering the tax [payment] by increasing the homestead exemption,” he said. Roanoke o- cials are taking

of city services, Roanoke Finance Director Vicki Rodriguez said. The city’s oper- ating budget will increase 1.62% in FY 2020-21, and the prop- erty tax rate for Roanoke resi- dents will remain unchanged for

a conservative budget without cutting any services to our citizens,” Rodri- guez said. “Departments were asked to maintain a at budget or make cuts where they deemed appropriate.” Along with instituting a hiring freeze in March—which remains in place—Roanoke cut two new full-time positions from its FY 2020-21 bud- get and reorganized departments to cover those positions, Rodriguez said. However, no cuts to city services were made, she said. The city of Fort Worth’s general fund budget for FY 2020-21 will total $782 million, an increase of 1.3% from FY 2019-20. According to City Manager David Cooke, among other cost-saving measures, the city has instituted a hiring freeze and will not provide

CONTINUED FROM 1

“A LOT OF EFFORTS WERE TEMPORARY WHILE WE FIGURED OUT HOW COVID-19 WOULD IMPACT US, BUT WE’VE ACTUALLY FARED BETTER THAN A LOT OF SURROUNDING CITIES. IT SHOWS THE IMPORTANCE OF BUYING LOCAL.”

“This budget addresses uncertainty while providing for sustainability,” Keller City Manager Mark Hafner said. As a result of a 12%-14% increase in the homestead exemption, the esti- mated property tax paid by Keller homeowners will decrease for the seventh year in a row, Hafner said. The city has also “dialed back” a number of projects that would have added more than $2 million in expenses to the budget, Keller Finance Director Aaron Rector said. In order to create more of a “cushion” on the nancial side of things, the city has shifted from its policy of funding entire projects in their rst year. Proj- ects are now being funded one year at a time, which also allows Keller Public

the 24th year in a row, Rodriguez said. The city is also working with residents to waive late fees on utility bills, she said. “Sta worked diligently to provide

AARON RECTOR, CITY OF KELLER DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

a similar approach by aiming to mit- igate tax impact on residents while still maintaining an adequate level

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

pay increases to general employees. The city has also moved to reduce its workforce by 120 positions. In order to maintain adequate city services, Fort Worth will invest more than $390 million in general projects at city airports and convention cen- ters as well as in water and stormwa- ter improvements, Cooke said. The city will also invest more than $48 million in street, trac light and sidewalk maintenance to improve city transit access. “We are spending $300 mil- lion-$400 million in capital every year,” Cooke said. “That’s a signi- cant amount of money. The positive piece is we’re keeping our emphasis on infrastructure investment and the maintenance of that infrastructure.” Capital projects already complete or underway in North Fort Worth include the Golden Triangle Library, two new re stations, the north side animal shelter, and new parks and trails, Cooke said. “I really appreciate the community engagement that went into the budget this year,” said Ann Zadeh, Fort Worth City Council member for District 9. “There was an incredible amount of outreach and opportunity for res- idents … to let us know what their

priorities were.”

Tax rate: $ 0.37512

The city of Keller has saved some funds by shifting some city services to the private sec- tor. Additionally, since 2009, the city has reduced its full- time sta from 369 employees to 342 employees, Hafner said. F u r t h e r m o r e , the city of Keller has partnered with Roanoke, Westlake and other entities to share the expense of some city services, such as policing and a new regional ani- mal control position. “We’d rather live within our means,

Due to the three cities’ conservative budget plans, scal year 2020-21 property tax rates will remain the same or decrease from those of FY 2019-20 in Keller, Roanoke and Fort Worth.

114

35W

Keller

Avg. projected tax bill in FY 2020-21:

Homestead exemption:

170

Tax rate:

14%

$ 0.7475

$ 1,390

Roanoke

377

Homestead exemption:

Avg. projected tax bill in FY 2020-21:

Tax rate: $ 0.3950

20%

$ 1,500

Fort Worth

Avg. projected tax bill in FY 2020-21:

Homestead exemption:

20%

N

$ 1,053

SOURCES: CITY OF KELLER, CITY OF ROANOKE, CITY OF FORT WORTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

importance of buying local: Even if you’re buying online and having it sent to your house, that has a posi- tive impact.”

watch cash ow and plan well,” Haf- ner said. “City Council and citizens understand the value of paying as you go with cash balances as long as we’re providing tax mitigation.” The city has also restructured debt payments to save an additional $800,000, according to Rector. In

addition, much as has Roanoke, Keller has deed sales tax revenue expecta- tions throughout the pandemic. “A lot of eorts were temporary while we gured out how COVID-19 would impact us, but we’ve actually fared better than a lot of surround- ing cities,” Rector said. “It shows the

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

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All information (including, but not limited to prices, views, availability, school assignments and ratings, utility and service providers, tax rates, incentives, floor plans, site plans, features, standards and options, assessments and fees, planned amenities, programs, conceptual artists’ renderings, and community development plans) deemed reliable as of publication date but not guaranteed and remains subject to change daily or delay without notice. Any community improvements, recreational features and amenities described are based upon current development plans, sales activities and budgets, which are subject to change and under no obligation to be completed. Floor plans and elevations are an artist’s conception and are not intended to show specific detailing. As-Built Condition will control. Price(s) shown may not reflect lot premiums, upgrades and options. All homes subject to prior sale. Maps and plans are not to scale, and all dimensions are approximate. Please refer to the Governance Documents and current Master Association’s Budget found in your Sales Documents and contact the HOA Management Company for a more thorough description of these and all other assessments, fees and responsibilities. Not an offer in any state where prohibited or otherwise restricted by law. Please see a Taylor Morrison Community Sales Manager or visit www.taylormorrison.com for further details. © October 2020, Taylor Morrison of Texas, Inc. All rights reserved. 10/12/20 2698

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CONTINUED FROM 1

a total of 221,760 in-person and mail-in ballots had already been cast as of end of day on Oct. 17, which represents 18.5% of all registered voters in the county. In the 2016 presidential election, there were a total of 239,876 bal- lots counted during the rst ve days of early voting in Tarrant County, or 22.3% of all registered voters within the county. Tarrant County voters are eligi- ble to vote at any polling location in the county during early voting. Voters at the polls on Oct. 13 said that safety precautions in place have helped them feel safe and comfortable. Despite the long lines, for some voters, the pro- cess was rapid and ecient.

“It was great. [I was] very sur- prised how great, how well orga- nized it was,” said Grapevine resident Mary Engel, who voted at Grapevine REC with her husband, Jimmy. “It really feels good to see so many people out voting. It did my heart good to walk up and have to stand in the long line.” In contrast, voters in Keller and North Fort Worth were facing long lines and other diculties on the rst day of early voting, as a result of a poll worker who rested posi- tive during a training session. “I’ve never waited that long to vote in my life,” said Keller resi- dent Barbara Rhome, who voted at Keller Town Hall. By Friday, Oct. 16, the wait in

Keller had dropped from an aver- age of three hours to one hour, according to elections ocials. As Keller’s only voting location, Town Hall averaged more than 1,200 ballots cast during each of the rst three days of early vot- ing. Wait times also signicantly improved in North Fort Worth where a polling location at the Vil- lages of Woodland Springs saw an 80% increase in ballots cast from day one to day three of early vot- ing. A total of 1,543 ballots were cast at that location on Oct. 15.

LOCAL CANDIDATES TO BE LISTED ON THE SAME BALLOT AS STATE, NATIONAL ELECTIONS

Elections for Keller, Roanoke and Northwest ISD will be held Nov. 3 along with federal, state and county elections, which has resulted in longer ballots for voters in the area. Tarrant County Elections Administrator Heider Garcia suggested that voters print out their sample ballot and mark their choices prior to showing up at the polls. Deborah Peoples, chair of the Tarrant County Democratic Party, said it is imperative that voters show up to the ballot box prepared. “We’re telling everybody: Don’t stop at the top. You vote from the top of the ballot to the bottom of the ballot,” she said at a Sept. 24 town hall event. Rick Barnes, chair of the Tarrant County Republican Party, said his oce will be working with local operations to ensure they do not become overcrowded. “We are walking into a lot of unknowns,” he said. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CANDIDATES • The Keller Chamber of Commerce hosted a “Meet the Leaders” forum at Keller Town Hall on Oct. 1. The forum was attended by all three candidates for may- or, who each discussed their background, their vision for the community and how they would accomplish that vision. To view a recording of the event, go to www.cityoeller.com. • Vote during o-peak hours, such as mid-morning. • Visit www.communityimpact.com/vote to nd candidate Q&As and more information. TIPS FORVOTING • Vote early. Early voting runs through Oct. 30. • Election day is Nov. 3.

To keep up with early voting and election information, visit communityimpact.com .

1 Independence Elementary 11773 Bray Birch Lane, Fort Worth 2 Light of the World Church 8750 N. Riverside Drive, Keller 3 Lone Star Elementary 4647 Shiver Road, Fort Worth 4 Northpark YMCA 9100 N. Beach St., Fort Worth 5 The Met Church East 11301 N. Riverside Drive, Fort Worth 6 The Villages of Woodland Springs Amenities Center 12209 Timberland Blvd., Fort Worth 7 Woodland Springs Elementary 12120 Woodland Springs Drive, Fort Worth 8 Bear Creek Bible Church 1555 N. Tarrant Parkway, Keller 9 First United Methodist Church of Keller 1025 Johnson Road, Keller 10 Indian Springs Middle School 305 Bursey Road, Keller 11 Keller Town Hall 1100 Bear Creek Parkway, Keller Voters can cast their ballots at any voting center within the county they reside during early voting. Here are polling places in your area. WHERE TO VOTE IN PERSON CURBSIDE FLEXIBILITY Tarrant and Denton Counties oer curbside voting options for disabled voters. Learn more at each county’s election website. votedenton.com | tarrantcounty.com/elections HICKS RD. 287 E. BLUE MOUND RD.

1171

NORTHEAST FORTWORTH

156

114

377

BYRON NELSON BLVD.

35W

ROANOKE

16

DENTON COUNTY

HASLET ROANOKE RD.

TARRANT COUNTY

170

15

HISTORIC VOTER TURNOUT

12

BRAY BIRCH LN.

MARSHALL RIDGE PKWY.

Tarrant County turnout is typically lower during non-presidential election years, but turnout was up in the 2018 election. Ocials anticipate higher turnout in the 2020 election as well.

6

9

7

JOHNSON RD.

TIMBERLAND BLVD.

1

WOODLAND SPRINGS DR.

BEAR CREEK PKWY.

Registered voters who did not vote

Voter turnout

KELLER PKWY.

N G LE B L

N

13

The voter turnout percentage in 2018, a non- presidential election year, was the same as it was in 2000, a presidential election year.

5

11

S. KELLER SMITHFIELD RD.

HERITAGE TRACE PKWY.

SARAH BROOKS DR.

4

14

200,000 0 400,000 600,000 800,000 1,000,000 1,200,000

3

8

N

2

SHIVER RD.

10

BURSEY RD.

56%

12 Ridgeview Elementary School 1601 Marshall Ridge Parkway, Keller 13 St. Martin Episcopal Church 223 S. Pearson Lane, Keller 14 Westwind Church 1300 Sarah Brooks Drive, Keller 15 John M. Tidwell Middle School 3937 Haslet-Roanoke Road, Roanoke

56%

KELLER

WESTERN CENTER BLVD.

N

MAP NOT TO SCALE

SOURCE: TARRANT COUNTY ELECTIONS ADMINISTRATION COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Find an interactive version of this map at communityimpact.com .

16 Roanoke Public Library 308 S. Walnut St., Roanoke

Year

820

13

KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

BUSINESS FEATURE

BY SANDRA SADEK

Owner Shawn Rizzo works on a car in his shop, Kraken Motorsports, on Sept. 29. (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

Shawn Rizzo said regular maintenance of your car’s uids is the best way to make sure the car stays in good condition.

Kraken Motorsports is a mechanic and performance shop owned by Alicia and Shawn Rizzo, pictured in the center. Team members also include Josh Duncan and Phillip MacPherson. (Courtesy Kraken Motorsports)

Change your oil at the right interval: Changing your oil earlier than needed can be more harmful to your engine than you think, Rizzo said. In order to prolong their car’s life, owners should follow manufacturer instructions when changing the oil. Use the right type of uids: It can be tempting to substitute an expensive synthetic uid for a cheaper alternative, but doing so can negatively aect your car’s engine. “Maintenance is one area you don’t want to skimp on,” Rizzo said.

KrakenMotorsports Husband and wife car enthusiasts pursue life passion W hen Shawn and Alicia Rizzo rst opened their high-performance mechanic shop in 2018, they knew their business would

decided to rethink the work-life balance. “I was basically working 120 hours a week,” he said. “Alicia was like, ‘You have to pick. [If] you want to work on cars, we need to open a shop.’ ” Alicia also seized the opportunity. “It was a perfect combination,” she said. Since opening the shop, which oers everything from routine maintenance to high-performance upgrades with particular focus on Japanese models, Shawn and Alicia have tried to create an environ- ment that reects their personality. Kraken Motorsports partners with 22KILL, a nonprot organization that aims to prevent suicide among veterans and rst responders. It also hosts an annual toy drive. “It’s important for us to have a dierent type of automotive experience,” Alicia said. “We want people to be very comfortable and feel comfortable asking questions and enjoy being here,” she said.

KrakenMotorsports 1929 Golden Heights Road, Ste. 1104, Fort Worth 817-744-8240 www.kraken-motorsports.com Hours: Tue.-Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun.-Mon. by appointment only

be dierent from the average shop. To them, being around cars isn’t work. It’s a lifestyle. The couple’s passion for cars and racing began long before the shop ever opened. As soon as Shawn got his driver’s license at the age of 16, he began racing with the Sports Car Club of America and later became a driving instructor. Alicia had been drag racing for years as well. And while their love for cars goes back years, so does Shawn and Alicia’s relationship. “We’ve known each other since we were 11 years old,” Alicia said. While employed at a car dealership, Shawn started building cars on the side. But when his passion started to take over all his free time, he

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE BLVD.

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

3 DISHES TO TRY

The Avocado Chicken Salad ($12.50) has grilled chicken, spinach, avocado, feta cheese, egg and tomato.

“IWASNOTA RESTAURATEUR, BUT I TOOKTHE PLUNGE…ANDSAID, ‘LET’SDOTHIS.’” CRISTINA MARTINEZ, MANAGING OWNER OF THE STATION PATIO ICEHOUSE

COURTESY THE STATION PATIO ICEHOUSE

The All Aboard Burger ($13.50) comes with blue cheese crumbles, chipotle sauce and avocado.

DINING

Cristina Martinez (left) runs her brother’s business, The Station Patio Icehouse, and is often helped by her niece, Alexis Trevino (center), and her daughter, Alysia Zollinger (right). (Sandra Sadek/Community Impact Newspaper)

COURTESY THE STATION PATIO ICEHOUSE

The Station Patio Icehouse Restaurant and bar brings family-friendly country vibes to Old Town Keller M anaging owner of The Station Patio Icehouse Cristina Martinez said she available in order to be successful. “That rst year was like a roller and it all starts going around.” Martinez said she has learned a BY SANDRA SADEK

The hand-tossed, 14-inchMeat Lover’s Pizza ($22) comes with sausage, pepperoni and ham.

coaster,” she said of the restaurant’s opening in 2018. “I had to really throw myself in there and go to every sem- inar, every webinar. Fortunately, we had a lot of mentors that were already in the industry. We took the principles that they shared with us, and it really helped us establish that foundation.” Since opening the Icehouse’s doors two years ago, Martinez has mastered what she believes is the key element to a successful business: teamwork. “As far as the sta, they have to be really willing to work well with other people,” she said. “In this industry, as soon as you walk in the door, every- thing has to be owing simultane- ously to give that good experience. It has to be like dominoes. One trickles,

lot in her rst year at the restaurant. The hardest part of running a small business has been cultivating a sta culture that highlights the owner’s vision, she said. The restaurant oers a variety of beer, wine and original cocktails, such as the Locomotive and Rick’s Rita. It also has a large specialty menu with signature burgers, sandwiches, pizzas and entrees, such as Rick’s Slammin’ Salmon. “Dealing with people and bringing them together—that’s the most di- cult thing that you’re going to face in any business, and that’s what I feel I have frommy team,” Martinez said. “They not only stand for our vision, but they believe in us and trust us.”

COURTESY THE STATION PATIO ICEHOUSE

was not previously a restaurateur. “But I took the plunge … and said, ‘Let’s do this,’” she said. The Old Town Keller restaurant is the brainchild of Martinez’s brother, Rick Figueroa, who owns several local businesses in the area. “My dad was like, ‘You need to start going up there and helping your brother—see what you can do,’” Martinez said. “He knew some of the ideas and dreams that I had, and that’s when we started investing and getting into other businesses.” As Martinez learned how to navigate the restaurant industry, she made sure to use all of the resources

The StationPatio Icehouse 111 W. Vine St., Keller 682-593-5977 https://stationicehouse.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

GOLDEN TRIANGLE BLVD.

KELLER PKWY.

N

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KELLER  ROANOKE  NORTHEAST FORT WORTH EDITION • OCTOBER 2020

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