Cy-Fair Edition | April 2021

CYFAIR EDITION

VOLUME 12, ISSUE 8  APRIL 130, 2021

ONLINE AT

LOCAL VOTER GUIDE 2021

Hospital works to bring vaccines tomarginalized

VOTER GUIDE

22

IMPACTS

6 HEALTH CARE

POPCORN BLAST

11

27

COVID19 leads to rise in anxiety, depression

Violent crime, including murders, is up in Harris County, but data from other large cities shows similar increases. A national trend Murders in 2019 Murders in 2020 Chicago 55.35% trend *PRELIMINARY

THE SHARP INCREASE INHOMICIDES IS PART OF ANATIONAL TREND THAT STRUCKMAJOR

BY DANICA LLOYD

Cypress-based Amy Wine Counseling Center has had a 35% year-over-year increase in new clients during the COVID-19 pandemic. CEO Amy Wine said she has seen elevated levels of anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation amid a season of unknowns. “Right now, a lot of times you’ve got to be in sur- vival mode, which means do only what you’ve got to do to get through the day, and everything else can wait,” she said. Residents continue to deal with nancial instabil- ity, negative eects of prolonged isolation, changes in CONTINUED ON 34 CO P I N G W I T H COV I D  1 9 The Rice University-led COVID-19 Registry measures mental health symptoms reported by local residents. Data shown is as of mid-March. Percentage reporting being bothered by: Nervousness Trouble relaxing Worrying too much Easily annoyed Fear of something happening Cannot control worrying Restlessness 62% 57% 56% 56% 47% 43% 33%

U.S. CITIES IN 2020 ... SOCIOECONOMIC PRESSURES FELT

Los Angeles

24.81%

ACROSS THE COUNTRY ARE CAUSING CRIME TO RISE ACROSS THE U.S. COLIN CEPURAN, SENIOR JUSTICE RESEARCH POLICY ANALYST, HARRIS COUNTY JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

Harris County

40.94%

Dallas

24.14%

SOURCE: HARRIS COUNTY, CITY OF HOUSTON, DALLAS POLICE DEPARTMENT, CHICAGO POLICE DEPARTMENT, LOS ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

City of Houston

41.35%

County ocials take aimat increase in violent crime group that includes Art Acevedo, former Hous- ton Police Department chief. At the same time, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has made xing what he called a “broken” bail bond system an emergency item during the 87th Texas Legislature, citing the increasing crime rates as evidence of a problem. But when it comes to the actual bail reform to have taken place in Harris County, which has exclusively pertained to misdemeanors, data does not suggest a link to the increase Cy-Fair voices among those citing bail bond practices, sparking debate CONTINUED ON 32 A rise in violent crime in Harris County has local ocials urgently seeking solutions to combat the trend. However, a debate over the origins of the increase—including a 43% year-over-year increase in murder and a 33% increase in aggravated assaults—has sparked questions of exactly what is to blame and what should be done. Some law enforcement ocials have attributed the rise in murders to a mix of the COVID-19 pan- demic and bail bond practices in the county, a BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

SOURCE: RICE UNIVERSITY’S COVID19 REGISTRY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

and trust use.

Everyone deserves nonpartisan information they can

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMCIPATRON Contribute to CI Patron today!

Scan the QR code to watch our video about the Patron program.

2021 SPRING Pa r a d e o f H o m e s TM • A p r i l 2 3 - 2 5 a n d A p r i l 3 0 -Ma y 2

10 , 000 ADDITIONAL reasons n t� mov� t�

$ 10,000 off your custom homesite now through May.

Thinking of moving to College Station? Take a drive out to Mission Ranch during the Bryan/College-Station Parade of Homes ™ . Tour our gorgeous move-in ready homes and, now through May, get $ 10,000 off a custom homesite! These wooded lots offer beautiful lakefront views and up to two years to build your dream home. Water you waiting for? Visit our Welcome Center today!

missionranchtx.com

1828 Feather Run, College Station, TX 77845 7 979.318.3900 7 New homes from the $350s

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Leading Medicine IN TOWNE LAKE

Comprehensive care — close to home.

At Houston Methodist in Towne Lake, we offer primary care and specialty care, as well as mammograms and physical therapy — all close to home. And, you can be confident that we are taking every necessary precaution to keep you safe during your visit.

We offer the following services: • Cardiology • Neurology • Oncology • Orthopedics and sports medicine

HOUSTON METHODIST PRIMARY CARE GROUP AND SPECIALTY PHYSICIAN GROUP

• Physical therapy and rehabilitation • Plastic and reconstructive surgery • Primary care • Women’s services, including mammography

HOUSTON METHODIST BREAST CARE CENTER HOUSTON METHODIST PHYSICAL THERAPY AND REHABILITATION *

*Towne Lake offers screening mammograms only

To schedule an appointment, visit houstonmethodist.org/towne-lake or call 281.737.1555 .

3

CY-FAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

����������������������������������� �����������������

FOR�A�QUEEN�PRICE! * KING�SIZE�MATTRESS THE�MOST�COMFORTABLE�MATTRESS�IN�TEXAS!

*Offer effective �/��/������/��/�� on Yellow Rose mattresses; Cannot be combined with other offers. FULL�SIZE MATTRESS �FOR�A�TWIN�PRICE * QUEEN�SIZE MATTRESS �FOR�A�FULL�PRICE *

ADJUSTABLE BASE UPGRADE * FREE�PREMIUM PLUS�GET�A� �� *W/�IN�STORE�MATTRESS�SET�PURCHASE�OF�������OR�MORE

OPTIONAL�PRIVATE APPOINTMENTS� Schedule onl ine or call ������������ ������BARKER CYPRESS�RD�

STAR�IS�RECOGNIZED AS�A

ACROSS�FROM�H�E�B

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

ABOUT US

Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched the rst edition of Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 with three full-time employees covering Round Rock and Pugerville, Texas. We have expanded our operations to include hundreds of employees, our own printing operation and over 30 hyperlocal editions across three states. Our circulation is over 2 million residential mailboxes, and it grows each month with new residents and developments.

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMEMILY: Jersey Village residents will soon have the opportunity to vote in their city elections. Our Local Voter Guide features a sample ballot and candidate Q&As (see Page 22). We also summarize the history of Cy-Hope, which celebrated its 10th anniversary this spring (see Page 31). We hope you take time this spring to get outdoors and enjoy the many farmers markets, new businesses, restaurants and events happening in our community once again. Emily Heineman, GENERALMANAGER

Community Impact Newspaper teams include general managers, editors, reporters, graphic designers, sales account executives and sales support, all immersed and invested in the communities they serve. Our mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Our core values are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity.

FROMSHAWN: The eects of the coronavirus pandemic have been seen in many areas of life. Our stories this month take a look at two less obvious consequences: the toll taken on mental health and an upswing in violent crime. Crime trends have been seen in large cities across the U.S., but some local ocials said bail bond practices are partially to blame. We take a look at the data, what criminal justice experts are saying and how the county plans to address the trend. Shawn Arrajj, SENIOR EDITOR

Our purpose is to be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.

WHATWE COVER

Sign up for our daily newsletter to receive the latest headlines direct to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter DAILY INBOX Visit our website for free access to the latest news, photos and infographics about your community and nearby cities. communityimpact.com LIVE UPDATES

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Emily Heineman SENIOR EDITOR Shawn Arrajj SENIOR REPORTER Danica Lloyd GRAPHIC DESIGNER Stephanie Torres ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Karen Nickerson METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard

BUSINESS &DINING Local business development news that aects you

TRANSPORTATION &DEVELOPMENT Regular updates on area projects to keep you in the know

SCHOOL, CITY & COUNTY We attend area meetings to keep you informed

ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CORPORATE LEADERSHIP GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES &MARKETING DIRECTOR Tess Coverman CONTACT US

HOWWE’RE FUNDED

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of PATRON PROGRAM

ADVERTISING

Our local teams customize advertising

campaigns for all business sizes and industries wanting to reach their customer base and accomplish their goals. A third-party Readex survey proved 78% of paper recipients read three of the last four editions, and from what they read, 83% “took action” of some kind. Thank you to the advertisers in this edition who support our work. We would love for our readers to thank them as well.

8400 N. Sam Houston Parkway W., Houston, TX 77064 • 2814696181 PRESS RELEASES cyfnews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions

local, reliable reporting. Become a CI Patron today with a contribution of any amount. Together, we can continue to ensure citizens stay informed and keep businesses thriving.

communityimpact.com

facebook.com/impactnewscyf

© 2021 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All rights reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

35%

of Patrons opt for recurring monthly contributions

@impactnews_cyf

$10 is the average minimum

Patrons have chosen to give

Proudly printed by

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM ADVERTISING

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM CIPATRON

WE’VE TEAMEDUP TOBRING YOUMORE OF THE STORIES YOU CARE ABOUT

It’s my mission to save you money.

24324 Northwest Fwy Cypress 832-349-7211

Limitations apply. See Geico.com for more details. © GEICO & affiliates. © Washington, DC 20076 © 2019 Geico

Denise Buckley

5

CYFAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

G R A N T

6

6

SCHIEL RD.

8 11 13

12

10

E

7

U E T T

249

Little Woodrow’s

5

COURTESY LITTLE WOODROW’S

4

WILLOW CHASE DR.

coffee drinks are also on the menu. 832-604-6670. www.facebook.com/ karmakolachecypresswood 5 Kiddie Academy of Cypresswood opened in late January at 13909 Mando- lin Drive, Houston, near the intersection of Hwy. 249 and Cypresswood Drive. The 10,500-square-foot educational child care facility is bringing 35 new jobs to the community and is expected to serve 187 students ages 3-12. Curriculum at Kiddie Academy of Cypresswood promotes in- tellectual, social, physical and emotional growth, officials said. 346-388-6600. www.kiddieacademy.com 6 Bar and grill franchise Little Wood- row’s opened its eighth Houston-area location in Tomball on Feb. 23. Located at 11241 Timber Tech Ave., Tomball, Little Woodrow’s offers a full bar with drinks, such as cocktails and Texas craft beers. The Tomball location offers beer from local Houston breweries, such as Karbach Brewing Co. and Saint Arnold Brewing Co. In addition to daily drink specials and food items, the location offers an outdoor patio. 281-516-9993. www.littlewoodrows.com 7 Bimbimbox , an Asian grill and tea bar, had a soft opening March 31 at 10111 Lou- etta Road, Ste. 800, Houston. The new concept is based on the popular Korean rice dish bibimbap and will allow patrons to create their own Bimbimbox with their choice of savory grilled meats, hearty vegetables and homemade sauces. Fresh- brewed loose-leaf teas topped with boba will also be available in a variety of flavors. 281-789-0803. www.bimbimbox.com 8 A new location of Kumon Math and

J

2

MILL

290

99 TOLL

N. BRIDGELAND LAKE PKWY.

N . H O U S T

14

8

R E S S

1960

3

L

E

9

L O

6

529

1

MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2021 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOWOPEN 1 Uptown Beauty Supply opened a 12,000-square-foot store March 5 at 16317 FM 529, Ste. A, Houston, within a shopping center anchored by Dick’s Sporting Goods. The beauty supply store carries a variety of products, including hair dye, hairpieces, skin care, makeup and hair styling appliances. 281-815-5098. www.uptownbeauty.co 2 The newest location of Ogle School opened Feb. 22 at 12974A Willow Chase Drive, Houston. Classes at Ogle School prepare students for careers in the beauty industry, and full-time and part-time

schedules are available. Financial aid is available for qualified individuals. Hair, skin and nail services performed by stu- dents and supervised by licensed profes- sionals are available to the public. Due to COVID-19, appointments are required and are currently limited to haircuts, styling, hair color, highlights, chemical texturizing and skin care. 713-487-2060. www.ogleschool.edu 3 A new location of Nothing Bundt Cakes opened in early March at 9822 Fry Road, Ste. 170, Cypress. The bakery offers Bundt cakes in various sizes and flavors, including classic vanilla, chocolate choco- late chip, white chocolate raspberry, red

velvet, confetti, carrot, lemon, marble and pecan praline in addition to rotating seasonal flavors. Pickup and delivery services are available through online or- dering. This is the company’s first Cypress bakery. 281-671-0775. www.nothingbundtcakes.com 4 The fifth location of gourmet kolache and doughnut shop Karma Kolache opened March 6 at 10211 Cypresswood Drive, Ste. 100, Houston—the former location of Pin’s Donuts. Kolache flavors range from cheeseburger and smoked brisket to boudin and pepperoni pizza. Cinnamon rolls, apple fritters, cake doughnuts, breakfast sandwiches and

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

9

10

LA Crawfish

Bach to Rock

COURTESY LA CRAWFISH

COURTESY BACH TO ROCK

Reading Program is now open in the Bridgeland area at 10611 Fry Road, Ste. B2-200, Cypress. The education center offers an individualized reading and math curriculum for students from age 3 through high school. The new location can book eight students per half-hour with some flexibility depending on grade level. Staffers at the center are following COVID-19 safety precautions, and masks are required for in-person instruction. Online classes are also available. 936-931-4440. www.kumon.com/cypress-bridgeland 9 Vietnamese crawfish eatery LA Crawfish opened in February at 19841 Hwy. 290, Houston, near the FM 1960 intersection. In addition to live crawfish, the restaurant offers seafood items, such as po’ boys, oysters, crab and shrimp, as well as Vietnamese dishes, such as rice, pho and noodles. Some fusion items are also on the menu, includ- ing crawfish pho and crawfish empana- das. 832-688-8755. www.thelacrawfish.com 10 Music school Bach to Rock opened March 22 at 13215 Grant Road, Cypress. The business offers music lessons, includ- ing private lessons for individuals, group lessons and lessons for glee clubs and bands. The facility offers camps and can also host birthday parties. Owner Caroline Dabney runs the business with her mother, Barbara; both of them are pianists and piano teachers. 832-559-7047. http://cypress.bachtorock.com 11 Ayo Sopitan opened the moving service College Hunks of Copperfield on Feb. 19 at 16326 Mueschke Road, Cypress.

Services include junk removal and general labor, including furniture moving, packing and home staging. The business serves the Cypress, Katy and Copperfield areas. 281-645-6042. www.collegehunks.com/copperfield Mobile exterior painting company Spray- Net began serving the greater North Houston area in February and early March of this year. The company offers exte- rior painting services for surfaces, such as aluminum and vinyl sliding, stucco and brick. In addition to exterior paint jobs, the company also services front and garage doors, windows and kitchen cabinets. Spray-Net operates in Cypress and Tomball, among other communities. 877-457-7729. www.spray-net.com COMING SOON 12 Officials with Farmer’s Insur- ance—Williams Agency LLC plan to start operating out of their newly constructed building at 13145 Spring Cypress Road, Bldg. 1, Ste. B, Cypress, in April. The team held a soft opening in March and will be working from home in the meantime. The full-service insurance brokerage firm offers homeowners, auto and business insurance as well as workers compensa- tion, general liability and RV and boat insurance. 281-503-1988. 13 The Market Home Decor, Gifts, DIY is slated to open in April at 16326 Mueschke Road, Ste. E4, Cypress. This is the retailer’s second location, having expanded from Market Street in Tomball. Products include farmhouse and vintage home decor and gifts, including The Round Top Collection, Scentsational Candles, Brumate, Tula Blue necklaces

House of Pies features an extensive menu of pie flavors and other desserts.

COURTESY HOUSE OF PIES

FEATURED IMPACT COMING SOON Ocials with House of Pies conrmed the restaurant’s fth location is slated to open this fall at 25686 Hwy. 290, Cypress—the former location of PDQ. The eatery specializes in pies with avors ranging from lemon icebox and strawberry cream cheese to sweet potato, buttermilk, coconut cream, German chocolate and French silk. Cakes, cheesecakes and other baked goods are also on the menu. In addition to specialty sweets, House of Pies also oers an extensive breakfast menu, burgers, sandwiches, and lunch and dinner options, such as chicken fried and Studio 67 Rugs. The business also sells DIY supplies and hosts workshops. 281-650-4099. www.themarkethomedecor.com RELOCATIONS 14 Full-service sign company Splendor Signs has relocated from 11115 Mills Road, Ste. 113, Cypress, to a new, larger location at 9420 FM 1960, Houston. After lease space at the previous locations, company officials said they now own their own locations, which includes 8,000 square feet of warehouse space in addition to backyard and front yard areas. The fami- ly-owned company can create all kinds of signs, including printing, banners and car wraps. For customers who do not know

chicken, sh and chips, grilled pork chops and steak. House of Pies has one location in The Woodlands and three in Houston. www.houseofpies.com

290

N

what they want, designers can produce designs on-site and give a free estimate. 281-970-8652. www.splendorsigns.com ANNIVERSARIES The Greater Houston LGBT Chamber of Commerce celebrated its fifth anniver- sary Feb. 24, marking half a decade of connecting LGBTQ allies and community members through business opportuni- ties. The organization is open to all and serves members throughout the Greater Houston area. The newly formed LGBT Chamber Foundation raises funds for initiatives that address economic inequity

within the LGBTQ community. www.houstonlgbtchamber.com

Must mention code CISPRING2021 when booking appointment. Minimum of $450. Expires 5/4/2021. $50 OFF SERVICE FIND OUT WHAT MAKES US THE BEST

SUMMER SPORTS CAMP

SPORTS. GOD. FUN. JUNE 14-18 • 9:00AM - 2:30PM

T R E E S E R V I C E

EXPERTLY CARING FOR CYFAIR’S URBAN FOREST FOR OVER 23 YEARS!

FOR KIDS ENTERING 1ST-6TH GRADE IN THE FALL OF 2021

www.JonesRoadTreeService.com Nationally Accredited by the Tree Care Industry Call today for your complimentary consultation 281-469-0458

ARMORED-SPORTS.COM/THEMET

REGISTER EARLY & SAVE $10

7

CY-FAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

Win Register to win $5000 for visiting any of our builder model homes.

Find the Right Home in the Right Community

Ladera Trails

61 Model Homes Let’s face it: 2020 changed everything. Home has never been more important and you can find Houston’s very best places to call home with Friendswood Development Company. For more than 59 years, Friendswood Development Company has created outstanding communities filled with the best homes, amenities, schools and more. And with 24 communities and 61 model homes open daily, you are sure to find your new home! Whether you want to shop in person, take a 360 tour of one of our signature master-planned communities or builder model homes from your laptop on your couch, or facetime with a Sales Counselor, you will find there are lots of options for you in our neighborhoods. 24 Communities DiscoveryHomeTour.com FriendswoodDevelopment.com

Country Colony

Harmony Village

Northpark

Becker Meadows

Kingwood Drive

99

249



Katy Crossing

8

Porter Ranch

290

59

6

upland preserve

ENERGY CORRIDOR Galleria

Westpark Tollway

Texas Medical Center

59

99

HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL

SUGAR LAND

Visit DiscoveryHomeTour.com to find out about our Free Food Truck events.

Sendero

6

FM 518

to GALVESTON

Katy Crossing

WINWARD

UPLAND PRESERVE

Country Colony

* No purchase necessary to win $5000. Every entry has an equal chance of winning. Price and availability subject to change without notice.

BECKER MEADOWS

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Harris County sues TxDOT over I45 overhaul proposal

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

ONGOING PROJECT NORTHPOINTE BLVD.

BY EMMA WHALEN

GREGSON RD.

WESTLOCK DR.

Turning a new page in eorts to inuence the Texas Department of Transportation’s planned $7 billion overhaul of I-45, Harris County ocials are suing the agency in federal court. On March 11, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo and County Attorney Christian Menefee announced the action, which asks the court to revoke the agency’s record of decision and to address concerns with the project. The lawsuit alleges TxDOT failed to adequately consider the full environ- mental ramications of the project in its nal environmental impact statement, which is a federally required step. “We’ve been good-faith partners to TxDOT. We’ve done everything we could to move this project forward, but it has come time to pursue legal recourse,” Hidalgo told reporters. The announcement comes after over a year of advocacy from various groups, such as the Make I-45 Better Coalition and Stop TxDOT I-45. Both have expressed concern over the impact of the project on neighbor- hoods in the East End and Northside of Houston where the proposed reroute and expansion of I-45 will displace over 900 residences, 300 businesses, ve places of worship and two schools, according to the agency’s nal environmental impact statement. Local ocials have repeatedly made attempts to inuence the project. Beginning in 2019, the city of Houston led a separate public input process, which resulted in proposed alternatives to the plan, including

N. ELDRIDGE PKWY.

249

N

North Eldridge Parkway widening Harris County Precinct 4 previously anticipated sending a project out for construction bids in the fourth quarter of 2020, but the project timeline is now to be determined. The project will widen North Eldridge Parkway to four concrete lanes between Spring Cypress and Westlock roads. Trac signals would also be added at West- lock Drive and Gregson Road. Timeline: TBD Cost: TBD Funding source: Harris County Precinct 4

The TxDOT I45 project would reroute the highway away fromMidtown through the East End and expand it through the Northside. (Courtesy Nathan Colbert)

one in which the highway would be upgraded for safety improvements but maintain its current footprint. A representative from Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner’s oce declined to comment on the coun- ty-led lawsuit. After the agency’s nal environ- mental impact statement was issued in September, critics of the plan noted it failed to incorporate many of the recommendations identied through the city’s public input process. “The FEIS is 8,189 pages across three volumes. That would be impossible to read in the 30 days. At rst glance, we don’t see any major changes, especially ones of the magnitude that Mayor [Sylvester] Turner identied,” Link Houston Director Oni Blair said in September. Link Houston, a nonprot, advocates for equity in transportation policy. Proponents of the project have said it will ease congestion, particularly for commuters; update the highway’s safety; and mitigate ooding issues along its path.

Recently, eorts by the leaders of the Houston-Galveston Area Trans- portation Policy Council, a regional group responsible for contributing a portion of funds to the project, failed to produce an agreement with TxDOT about how to prioritize feedback on the project. Throughout the process, TxDOT ocials have said they will continue to accept and incorporate feedback. “We were looking forward to con- tinuing our work with stakeholders on rening the plans for the project, but these plans may now be in jeopardy due to the lawsuit,” TxDOT Executive Director James Bass wrote in a statement to Community Impact Newspaper . Those eorts, however, have failed to reassure county leaders, Hidalgo said. “We have convened meetings. We’ve proposed a memorandum of understanding,” Hidalgo said on March 11. “Time after time, TxDOT has done nothing but given us and our community lip service. They have bulldozed over us.”

COMPLETED PROJECT

QUEENSTON BLVD.

N

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF MARCH 17. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT CYFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. Harris County Precinct 3 nished a project in February to extend all left turn lanes at the intersection in addition to implementing pedestrian improvements and replacing all failed pavement. Timeline: November-February Cost: $460,000 Funding source: Harris County Precinct 3 Queenston Road and Longenbaugh Drive intersection improvements

At Next Level, we are committed to creating the best patient experience possible. You can get in line, online, walk in, make an appointment, or schedule a virtual visit. We’re just what the patient ordered.

Treatment that treats you better.

Cypress 8350 N Fry Rd, Ste 400 Cypress, TX 77433

Copperfield 8100 Highway 6 N, Ste E Houston, TX 77095

nextlevelurgentcare.com • Open 9am – 9pm, 7 days a week

9

CYFAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

HOME THIS SUMMER? GET OUTSIDE & PLAY!

HIGHEST RATED BASKETBALL GOAL

MANUFACTURER DIRECT PRICES

50% MORE GLASS & STEEL VS. BIG BOX STORE

$400 OF F INSTA L L AT ION Professional Installation on site - only $99 for a limited time! LIMITED TIME SPRING SPECIAL!! 1-888-600-8545

s

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED FOR OVER 36 YEARS .

WWW.PRODUNKHOOPS.COM

AP is a trademark registered and owned by the College Board, which is not affiliated with, and does not endorse this product. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University. LEARNING STARTS HERE Parents want the best for their children, and CFISD pre-kindergarten is the best choice for young learners. Pre-K students don’t just learn the ABCs and 123s; they learn to explore, cooperate and achieve in a safe and welcoming classroom. Pre-K is a fun and important first step toward a child’s successful education journey, so choose CFISD pre-K today.

CONDENSED WIDE - WHITE

To learn more about choosing CFISD pre-K, visit CFISD.net.

Opportunity for All

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE HoustonMethodist addresses vaccineaccess formarginalized

Distribution disparities

Hispanic individuals make up the largest portion of Harris County’s population, but the largest percentage of COVID-19 vaccines have gone to white residents.

HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH VACCINE DISTRIBUTION AS OF MARCH 25

BY DANICA LLOYD

Community Benets Ryane Jackson said. This has included historically Black fraternities and sororities, the Latin Women’s Initiative, the Houston Food Bank, federally qualied health centers and religious groups. For example, church leaders are holding Sunday Signup events where they inform their congregations how important the vaccine is in protecting themselves and others. “All groups of people, regardless of your race or ethnicity, nd value in their faith, but I do think there’s some historical rootedness in the African American community and in the Latino [community] with truly following the advice and feedback of their faith leaders,” Jackson said. Individuals who sign up receive a text to either register themselves or call a designated phone number to have a Houston Methodist represen- tative register them. They can also indicate transportation needs—which Jackson said about 10% do—and the hospital system can coordinate rides. In addition to transportation issues, language and citizenship status can be major barriers in the Latino commu- nity. According to data fromHarris County Public Health, the county’s population is 44% Hispanic, but only 31% of vaccine distribution has been to Hispanic individuals as of March 25. Jackson said residents living in the country illegally may also be fearful of visiting major hospitals but are more likely to trust their smaller community clinics, so Houston Methodist has also leveraged part- nerships with those agencies. Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo announced March 25 more than 1 million COVID-19 vaccine doses had been distributed throughout the county. She commended Harris County Public Health for its eorts to reach vulnerable individuals, mentioning the importance of equitably vaccinating populations that traditionally lack access to health care. “We need to make sure that everybody gets vaccinated from all communities not just because it’s the right thing to do, but because it’s the only way to reach herd

Forty-two percent of Black Americans said they planned to get vaccinated for COVID-19 compared to 61% of white Americans, according to a November survey from the Pew Research Center. Dr. Ryan Neal, division head of hospital medicine at Houston Meth- odist, said the COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated preexisting health care access issues among communities of color, the poor and the underinsured. For instance, local residents who were not connected to major health care hubs may have missed out on early vaccination opportunities. “They were sort of left out on the periphery trying to get this vaccine—even if they were in Phase 1 and eligible,” he said. “You see that as one point of accessibility, but where this reverberates even larger is the fact that these are the same people who can’t get in for regular visits to a primary care physician.” Barriers, such as insurance and transportation, have long been factors that disenfranchise certain popu- lations from equitable health care opportunities, Neal said. Another layer of complication that has become apparent during the vaccine rollout is inequity in access to technology. Neal said not everyone has access to a computer or the tech savvy to navigate websites where vaccine registration is taking place. Because the vaccine remains unattainable for so many marginalized individuals who are often at the high- est risk for COVID-19 complications, Houston Methodist has taken several measures to expand access. “We sometimes underestimate just how hard it is for a 75-year-old lady who doesn’t drive to nd someone to take them for an appointment where they might have to wait in line for hours,” he said. Increasingaccess One of the ways Houston Methodist has taken steps to make the vaccine more accessible for people of color is partnering with community organiza- tions to identify vaccine-eligible individuals, Vice President of

18% Black

31% Hispanic

3% Other/unknown

13% Asian

35% White

HARRIS COUNTY POPULATION

19% Black

44% Hispanic

1% Other

7% Asian

29% White

The data below represents the percentages of American adults who indicated in a November survey they planned to get a vaccine for COVID-19.

Race/ethnicity

Age

71%

83%

65 and older 50-64 30-49 18-29

Asian Hispanic White

63%

60%

61%

53%

42%

55%

Black

Family income

Political party

69%

71%

Democrat Republican

Upper income Middle income Lower income

60%

50%

55%

SOURCES: PEW RESEARCH CENTER, HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

immunity,” she said. County initiatives to increase vaccine access for marginalized pop- ulations include oering transpor- tation to appointments, registering residents of homeless shelters and nursing homes, and setting up a vac- cine hotline for individuals lacking the capabilities to register online. Vaccinehesitancy While there are practical ways to address the logistical challenges and fears underserved communities experience, Jackson said there are also historical issues of trust of the medical community in certain cultures. This stems from unethical health care treatment of these groups such as the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male,” a 40-year study that misled and failed to properly treat hundreds of Black men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Neal said there will always be some

suspicion from the African American community when governmental input meets recent medical research and the pharmaceutical industry. “And I think, based on our history, that is sometimes warranted,” he said. “There’s caution from the perspective of, ‘Is this safe? Am I going to be unduly aected? Should I really be taking it? Can I trust what my political leaders are saying I should do?’” Neal said he is hopeful at least 80% of the population will get vaccinated for the potential of herd immunity. However, those with comorbidities and high-exposure work settings face higher risks than others. “People who work in public transportation, people who work in public-access facilities where they have to deal with people one-on-one, people even in the food services business have to consider themselves high risk because of exposure,” he said. “[They] should be looking at their rst available opportunity to get the vaccine.”

11

CYFAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

IT’S “MORE“

SEASON

There’s now even more to love at Elyson. Our 12 new model homes are open, along with Timber Grove Park, our newest place to play. Come out and see them all— and start your tour at our brand-new Welcome Center. Of course, you can always visit Elyson.com/more to learn ... well, more.

NEWHOMES FROM THE MID $200S 281.640.4004 23634 Savannah Sparrow Lane, Katy, TX 77493

From Grand Parkway, exit FM529 and travel west. Turn right at Elyson Blvd. and follow signs to Model Home Village.

Newland is the largest private developer of mixed-use communities in the United States. With our partner, North America Sekisui House, LLC, we believe it is our responsibility to create enduring, healthier communities for people to live life in ways that matter most to them. newlandco.com | nashcommunities.com

Homes at Elyson ® are built and sold by home builders (“Builders”) unaffiliated with NASH FM 529, LLC (“Owner”), Newland Real Estate Group LLC (“Newland”) or their related entities. Buyers should review the purchase agreement, public offering statement, and other offering materials provided by the seller prior to signing any contract to purchase a home. Details on the prospective development are provided for informational purposes only and there is no guarantee that the final development will match the developer’s vision. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. Copyright © 2021 NASH FM 529, LLC (“Owner”). All Rights Reserved. No reproductions, distribution, or unauthorized transmission of any portion is permitted without written permission of Fee Owner. (2/21)

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE

TRAUMA LEVELS Hospitals achieve different trauma levels by meeting standards set by the American College of Surgeons.

• Provides total care for every aspect of injury • 24-hour in-house general surgeons • Prompt availability of care in all Level II specialties as well as internal medicine, plastic surgery, pediatrics • Operates organized teaching, research effort • Can initiate definitive care for injured patients • 24-hour immediate care by general surgeons • Specialties in orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine, radiology, critical care • Continuing education programs for staff • Prompt assessment, resuscitation, surgery, intensive care and stabilization • 24-hour immediate care by emergency physicians • Provides prompt availability of general surgeons and anesthesiologists

LEVEL I

LEVEL II

LEVEL III

SOURCE: AMERICAN TRAUMA SOCIETY/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Memorial Hermanngets trauma designation for Cypresshospital

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

minutes via Life Flight air medical service, she said. Reasons a person may need to visit a trauma center vary and can include car collisions, hip fractures and gunshot wounds, Holub said. As the only Level III or higher trauma center in Cy-Fair, the Memo- rial Hermann center plays a vital roll in the Cypress and Waller areas, Holub said. Part of achieving the Level III des- ignation also involved working with emergency responders, including those with the Cy-Fair Fire Depart- ment, Waller Volunteer Fire Depart- ment and Rosehill Fire Department, Holub said. “Having this trauma center here also helps keeps our EMS providers in the area,” she said. “Once they are able to drop patients off quickly at our facility they can go back out to their routes instead of having to go much farther with an ambulance [to another hospital].” With rapid population growth predicted for the Cypress area at the time the hospital opened, achieving a Level III trauma designation was always part of the plan, Holub said. “We are very blessed to have sys- tem support and to have a dedicated trauma service line,” she said.

The trauma center at the Memorial Hermann Cypress Hospital has officially been designated as a Level III center by the state, officials said in a March 16 announcement. Teams have been working to obtain a Level III designation since 2018, a process that involved demonstrating the hospital can provide rapid emer- gency care for a variety of needs. “This designation is important to Cypress and the surrounding commu- nity because it confirms our trauma team’s ability to provide access to high quality trauma care at a trauma center in a timely manner,” hospital CEO Jerry Ashworth said in a March 16 statement. “Timing is critical in saving a life.” Key requirements include having 24-hour coverage of emergency medical physicians, a full schedule of general surgeons available who can arrive to the campus within 30 minutes and an anesthesiologist in-house 24/7, said Marci Holub, chief nursing officer with the hospital. In addition, the hospital can transport patients to a Level II trauma center at the Memorial Hermann Woodlands Hospital and a Level I center at system’s hospital in the Texas Medical Center within 10

13

CY-FAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Developments underway in the Cy-Fair area

COMPILED BY SHAWN ARRAJJ & DANICA LLOYD

RENDERING COURTESY HOWARD HUGHES CORP.

RENDERING COURTESY WOLFF COS.

PRAIRIELAND VILLAGE Construction is underway on the third of four villages in the Bridgeland master- planned community. It will ultimately feature 7,000 homesites, recreational lakes, a lakefront pavilion, and hike and bike trails. Homebuilders will be announced in May, Howard Hughes Corp. ocials said. Space: 3,000 acres Timeline: rst homes available as soon as spring 2022

BEACONHILL Construction is underway on Beacon Hill, a master-planned community in Waller being developed by Wol Cos. Plans include 870 single-family homes from Long Lake Ltd. and a business park along the future Hwy. 290 frontage road, which can accommodate light industrial and distribution, oce, multifamily and retail. Space: 564 acres Timeline: slated to open in June

OWENS RD.

99 TOLL

362

290

BRIDGELAND CREEK PKWY.

N

N

RENDERING COURTESY TRAMMELL CROW CO.

SHAWN ARRAJJCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

SHAWN ARRAJJCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

WEISER BUSINESS PARK Land has been cleared for the Weiser Business Park by Trammell Crow Co., which will feature 1.7 million square feet of Class A industrial space. Space: 1.7 million square feet Timeline: early 2020-TBD

CYPRESS CROSSING Construction is nearing completion on a Staybridge Suites at the Cypress Crossing development at the Hwy. 290 and FM 1960 intersection. Space: 115 rooms Timeline: work ongoing through 2021

NEXCOREMEDICAL OFFICE A structure is being raised at the site of a new medical oce building by NexCore Group near the HCA Houston Healthcare North Cypress Hospital. Space: 110,000 square feet Timeline: August 2020-October 2021

1960

290

290

290

N

N

N

ON THE ROAD TO RECOVERY - PROUD RECIPIENTS OF COVID-19 VACCINATIONS This Prestigious four story Independent Senior Living Community has set new standards in services and amenities to meet everyone’s expectations! Our spacious apartments feature modern design with the feel of “Home” and we are conveniently located near some of Houston’s most desirable shopping and popular attractions.

CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR PERSONALTOUR WITH LUNCH ON US!

The Solana ® Preserve Vintage Park Independent Senior Living | 14221 Vintage Preserve Parkway | Houston, TX 77070

For more information about our community, call 832-996-4900 today.

PRESERVE VINTAGE PARK I NDEPENDENT LI V I NG

brookdale.com

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Cy-Fair ISD

Cy-Fair ISD ramps up eorts to recruit, retain substitutes

SUBSTITUTE SHORTAGE Substitute pay rates at districts throughout the region range from $75-$125 per day for nondegreed and degreed individuals. Most districts increase pay rates for certied teachers.

BY DANICA LLOYD

Hear the �ign� This project and Middle School No. 20, among others, were included in the $1.76 billion bond passed in 2019. The new campus is slated to open in August 2023, completing the educational village with Wells Ele- mentary School and Bridgeland High School o Mason Road in Cypress. A partition separating the cafeterias at Wells and the middle school will open up to a shared space for large events, and an outside courtyard will also connect the two campuses, IBI Group ocials said. Construction contracts have not yet been awarded, but the middle school and exhibit center projects the daily pay rate in CFISD from $92 to $105 would ensure the district remains competitive. “And if we want to lead the area and really get the best of the best of our substitute teachers and have them choose Cy-Fair ISD to substi- tute, we need to go as high as $115 per day in order to do that,” she said. These proposed pay increases would cost the district an estimated $1.2 million-$2.2 million. To attract more applicants, the district also modied requirements in February to allow individuals with a minimum of 48 college credit hours to apply. These substitutes are paid $84 each day worked. Previously, Dobney said the district was one of the few in the region that required substitutes to have a bach- elor’s degree, and since changing the requirements about 25% of applicants have not had bachelor’s degrees.

the March 8 board meeting. A survey sent to substitute

CYFAIR ISD The number of daily teacher absences in Cy-Fair ISD rose from 568 in January 2020 to 821 in January 2021, but the number of sub- stitutes working each day decreased from 490 to 440 in that time frame, according to district data. CFISD has 1,307 active substitute teachers as of late January, and nearly 600 have been hired so far this school year—up from about 300 hired in 2019-20. But ocials said they would like to see the ll rate increase. “In the fall of 2020 it was evident to us that we had a concern with regards to our substitute ll rate. We had a problem with increased teacher absences and a lower ll rate than the previous year, and we recognized the need to have more [active] substi- tutes accepting assignments,” said Onica Mayers, director of employee relations and professional stang, at

teachers and paraprofessionals in the fall found 61% of respondents had accepted at least one job in 2020-21. Mayers said 95% of those who were not accepting assignments at the time attributed it to COVID-19. Most reported they were reluctant or fearful to take jobs on campuses, and others said they had underly- ing health concerns, had children attending school virtually from home or were caring for someone else. Based on survey responses, Mayers said an increase in pay would help incentivize substitute teachers and increase the district’s ll rate. Melanie Dobney, assistant director of CFISD’s substitute oce, said the daily pay rate for substitutes with at least a bachelor’s degree is higher in Fort Bend, Houston, Katy, Klein and Tomball ISDs, and increasing

Fort Bend ISD $110-$125 per day* Tomball ISD $90-$95 per day

Katy ISD $90-$100 per day Klein ISD $83-$95 per day Spring ISD $90 per day

Cy-Fair ISD $84-$92 per day Waller ISD $75-$85 per day

*AN ADDITIONAL $25 INCENTIVE WAS ADDED TO THESE RATES IN FEBRUARY.

Proposed substitute teacher daily pay rate: Additional $1.2 million-$2.2 million cost to CFISD $105-$115 SOURCES: CYFAIR ISD, VARIOUS NEIGHBORING SCHOOL DISTRICTSCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

were estimated to cost $97.4 million and $9.8 million, respectively, when the bond was rst proposed.

Cy-Fair ISD board of trustees The next meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. on April 8 at 10300 Jones Road, Houston, and are livestreamed at www.csd.net. Lone Star College System The next meeting is scheduled for 2 p.m. on May 6 and will be livestreamed via WebEx. www.lonestar.edu/trustees MEETINGSWE COVER

Plans for Cy-Fair ISDbond projects develop CFISD Exhibit Center’s seating capacity will be expanded for livestock shows among other events. (Rendering courtesy VLK Architects)

BY DANICA LLOYD

addition to Cy-Fair ISD’s Exhibit Center on Telge Road will increase seating capacity from 600 to 1,593.

CYFAIR ISD VLK Architects o- cials said a nearly 9,000-square-foot

9533 HUFFMEISTER RD. SUITE B HOUSTON, TX 77095

u

281.763.7960 DR. SHITAL PATEL AUDIOLOGIST

N o

15

CYFAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from Harris County & Jersey Village

Jersey Village City Council Will meet virtually at 7 p.m. April 19 713-466-2100 www.jerseyvillagetx.com Harris County Commissioners Court Will meet virtually at 10 a.m. April 13 713-698-1102 www.harriscountytx.gov MEETINGSWE COVER CITY HIGHLIGHTS JERSEYVILLAGE City residents who experienced pipe leaks during Winter Storm Uri in February will have their water bills aected by the storm preemptively adjusted to amounts representing their average water use. The Jersey Village City Council authorized the city’s nance director to more forward with the adjustments at a March 4 emergency meeting. The adjustments will be made for all residents whose bills were higher than average by 5,000 gallons or more, which ocials estimated would aect just over 300 people. Others who did not reach that 5,000-gallon threshold can reach out using the typical system for adjustments if they had a leak. HARRIS COUNTY New data presented to the Harris County Commissioners Court in March showed funding shortfalls for ood-control projects in several Cy-Fair watersheds related to a bond program enacted by the county in 2018. As of March, the Addicks Reservoir Watershed had a funding shortfall of $135 million, while the White Oak Bayou Watershed had a shortfall of $116 million. The Cypress Creek and Little Cypress Creek watersheds had smaller shortfalls of $41 million and $20 million, respectively. Some of the gap could be made up by state grants ocials said could be awarded in late April or early May. Commissioners also plan to look at potentially shifting some surplus toll road revenue to projects that have joint ood- control and mobility purposes.

JerseyVillageestablishesnewtaxzone

ST.

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

owners from 18 homes, representing 57% of the total value in the area, meeting state requirements for TIRZ formation. City Manager Austin Bleess previ- ously said there is no strong nancial incentive for builders to tear down and rebuild the Jersey Drive proper- ties. With a TIRZ in place, the city will be able to purchase and raze homes from residents who want to sell and would have exibility on oering incentives to builders to build new structures on the property. The TIRZ is not expected to be self-sucient at rst, according to a plan submitted to the council March 15. Ocials said once some redevel- opment occurs in the area, it may begin to spur additional development without TIRZ assistance. The city estimates it will spend $5 million to purchase and demolish 19 properties over the course of ve

JERSEY VILLAGE A batch of homes in Jersey Village will be part of a new tax increment reinvestment zone, or TIRZ, with the goal of boost- ing investment in a ood-prone area. Under the TIRZ, the city can take tax revenue generated from property within its boundaries and use it for projects within the TIRZ. In this case, the TIRZ is intended help the city specically with “teardown-rebuild” eorts, a type of ood mitigation strategy that involves tearing down homes and building new homes in their place that are better suited to withstand ooding. The TIRZ, formed following a unanimous vote by the Jersey Village City Council at a March 15 meeting, will encompass 32 homes on Jersey Drive, according to city documents. The city received a petition in February to form the TIRZ from home

N

years, although the plan is not set in stone. About $2.7 million of that cost could come from the city’s general fund. The rest will mainly come from tax revenue and money made from selling land, according to the city’s plan. The TIRZ will be governed by a nine-member board, which will include designees from state Sen. Paul Bettencourt and state Rep. Jon Rosenthal, as well as residents within the TIRZ boundaries and potentially representatives from local taxing entities. The TIRZ will be in eect until 2041. The board will hold at least one meeting per quarter that will be open to the public.

Harris County names Barbie Robinson newdirector of public health

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ

control and prevention, and nutrition and chronic disease prevention. Harris County launched a national search for Shah’s replacement in November. In a tweet, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo welcomed Robin- son to the county. “We’re proud to announce Barbie Robinson as Harris County’s new Public Health Director,” Hidalgo said. “She was selected after an incredibly thorough search, and I’m condent she’ll tackle the toughest public health challenges in our region with ambition, mastery and creativity.”

Robinson

HARRIS COUNTY Barbie Robin- son was named the next executive director of the Harris County Public Health Department at a March 9 meeting of the Harris County Com- missioners Court. Robinson will take the reins from interim Director Gwen Sims, who took over following the resignation of Dr. Umair Shah in December. A date has not yet been given for when Robinson will take over the department, which covers areas such as veterinary public health, disease

currently serves as director of the Sonoma County Department of Health Services in

Barbie Robinson

California, where she has served since her appointment in February 2017. Her responsibilities have included supporting community eorts to address health disparities and community health improvement.

Finance your remodel with a Texas Bay Home Equity Loan. Make your perfect home Possibl�!

N

9212 Fry Rd., Suite 100 Cypress, TX 77433 713.852.6700 TexasBayCU.org

NMLS: #280545

This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

17

CYFAIR EDITION • APRIL 2021

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52

communityimpact.com

Powered by