Cedar Park- Leander - June 2020

CITY& COUNTY

News from Cedar Park, Leander & Williamson County

QUOTEOFNOTE “WEWILLBEIMPACTED, BUTTHEDURATION ANDTHEDEPTHOF THEIMPACTISSTILL PLAYINGOUT.” CHAD TUSTISON, CEDAR PARK ASSISTANT FINANCE DIRECTOR NUMBER TOKNOW The Williamson County Wilco Forward grant program has helped more than 1,600 local small businesses as they deal with the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a May 29 news release. A total of more than $18.5 million in grant money has been issued since the program was launched May 6. 1,600 CITY HIGHLIGHTS CEDAR PARK City Council approved an ordinance May 28 to rezone 43 acres of development along Bell Boulevard. This is the latest city approval related to the Bell Boulevard Redevelopment Project, a planned mixed-use development. CEDAR PARK Cedar Park is the seventh fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to May 20 data released by the U.S. Census Bureau. From 2010-19, Cedar Park’s population swelled to 79,462—a 44.2% increase. LEANDER From 2018-19, Leander was the fastest-growing large city in the U.S., according to May 20 U.S. Census data. From July 1, 2018, to July 1, 2019, Leander’s population grew by 12% to 62,208 residents. Cedar Park City Council Typically meets the second and fourth Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. 450 Cypress Creek Road, Bldg. 4 512-401-5000 www.cedarparktexas.gov Leander City Council Typically meets the rst and third Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. 201 N. Brushy St. 512-259-1239 • www.leandertx.gov Travis County Commissioners Court Typically meets Tuesdays at 9 a.m. 700 Lavaca St., Austin 512-854-9020 www.traviscountytx.gov/ commissioners-court Williamson County Commissioners Court Typically meets Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. 710 S. Main St., Georgetown 512-943-1100 • www.wilco.org MEETINGSWE COVER

Williamson County commits additional $10M to small-business grants, more CARES funds

which the court approved. The county received the approxi- mately $93 million in federal funding April 23. Since then, the county has allocated $3 million for the county, $3.5 million for technology needs and $25 million in small-business grant funding, which totals $31.5 million, Heselmeyer said. In a second phase, the county plans to allocate an additional $40 million, which will include $20 million for cities; $1 million for the Williamson County and Cities Health District; the additional $10 million for the small-business grant program that was previously approved; and funding for emergency services districts and Bluebonnet Trails, a community services organization that focuses on mental illness of adults and children. Court members emphasized money will go to cities in which a majority of their residents are Williamson County residents.

BY ALI LINAN

WILLIAMSON COUNTY In a federal coronavirus aid update, Williamson County commissioners were informed on the spending of its $93 million package during the June 2 meeting. Of the $93 million in funding, the court earmarked $25 million for its Wilco Forward grant program that aided small businesses of fewer than 100 full-time equivalent employees “I CAN’T UNDERSCORE THE DIFFERENCE THIS ISMAKING IN OUR COMMUNITY.” SCOTT HESELMEYER, WILLIAMSON COUNTY TREASURER

impacted by the pandemic. As of June 1, 3,280 applications had been led, Williamson County Treasurer Scott Heselmeyer said. Of those, 500 came in the rst 30 minutes, 1,700 in the rst 12 hours and about 2,600 in the rst week, he said. In less than 30 days, 2,300 applica- tions have been approved with about 750 pending review, he added. About $23.8 million has been distributed so far, he said. “I can’t underscore the dierence this is making in our community,” Heselmeyer said. “This has been a monumental task.” Heselymeyer said he predicted another $10 million in funding will allow the county to deliver funding to all applied businesses that qualify, to

Cedar Park projects $2.4M-$4.4M drop in general fund due to COVID19 pandemic

Leander OKs new private school plan

BY TAYLOR GIRTMAN

BY TAYLOR GIRTMAN

CEDAR PARK Based on dierent recovery models, the city of Cedar Park estimates it will lose between $2.4 million-$4.4 million in the general fund as a result of the coronavirus. Assistant Finance Director Chad Tustison presented three models of varying recovery speeds at the Cedar Park City Council meeting May 14. The models anticipate sales tax revenue drops between April and September. The expected $21.5 million general fund revenue for iscal year 2019-20 is projected to drop to between $17.1 million-$19.1 million. “We will be impacted, but the duration and the depth of the impact is still playing out,” Tustison said, as sales tax activity lags by about two months, so the impact of the March and April shutdowns will not show up for a while longer. Sales tax revenue accounts for 30% of the city budget, and Tus- tison said the decrease in 1 cent operations sales tax revenue could lead to between $1 million-$2.81 million in losses. Other general fund losses come from drops in 1/8 cent

LEANDER At itsMay 21meeting, Leander City Council approved a concept plan and preliminary plat for a Challenger School location at Crystal Falls Parkway and 183A Toll in Leander. The private school group has four other Texas campuses, with one in Avery Ranch and one in Round Rock. The concept plan includes a proposed driveway through the school property to connect the adjacent roads and the removal of a heritage tree. Therewas no zoning change required for the 15.63-acre property, as it is zoned as commercial. Three Leander residents spoke against the proposed plan for trac congestion and against the removal of trees. A trac impact analysis in the plan includes several trac recommendations, including the addition and extension of road lanes and updated trac signal timing.

Cedar Park City Council held its May 14 meeting virtually. (Taylor Girtman/ Community Impact Newspaper) CEDAR PARK BUDGET MODELS Three models predict how a decrease in the 1 cent sales tax for city operations will aect the general fund budget. Recovery

Annual sales tax decrease

Budget impact

rate Fast Moderate Slow

$1 million $1.69 million $2.81 million

-6.7% -11.2% -18.5%

SOURCE: CITY OF CEDAR PARK COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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drainage sales tax, development fees, park fees, ines and forfei- tures, beverage tax and interest income.

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CEDAR PARK  LEANDER EDITION • JUNE 2020

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