San Marcos - Buda - Kyle | May 2020

SANMARCOS BUDA KYLE EDITION

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 1  MAY 11JUNE 7, 2020

ONLINE AT

Pandemic creates newera of online learning for local schools

Learning from home

The coronavirus pandemic has forced about 30,000 students in Hays County to nish the 2019-20 school year remotely.

BY EVELIN GARCIA

“A lot of us build our classrooms on relationships and those daily inter- actions that we take for granted, and that’s one of the hardest things for most of us,” said Michael Strunk, a 12th-grade teacher and coach at San Marcos High School. “Not being able to have those face-to-face interactions with our students and building those personal relationships [is dicult].” One of the biggest hurdles of remote instruction for Strunk has been bal- ancing new learning material under the present circumstances while “not CONTINUED ON 22

After the coronavirus pandemic brought classroom instruction to a halt for more than 28,100 students in Hays and San Macros CISDs, a new era of online teaching and learning was quickly, but not easily, adopted. The two local districts, after extend- ing spring breaks and moving reopen- ing goals, were directed to close for the remainder of the school year by Gov. Greg Abbott on April 17. It sent administrators, teachers, parents and students scrambling to pilot online education in unprecedented ways.

8,099 Students San Marcos CISD: 20,000+ Students Hays CISD:

Lincoln Hagerty, a kindergartner at San Marcos CISD, is one of the many students who

will be nishing the school year from home.

COURTESY MICHELLE HAGERTY

SOURCES: HAYS CISD, SAN MARCOS CISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

C E N S U S WO R K S H OW T H E

Data is distributed to states for redistricting.

Data from the census ultimately impacts state funding and representation. Here is how it gets there.

Mailers are distributed on how to complete the census.

Numerators, which are paid federal employees, knock on each door of unresponsive households to collect census information.

Census data is compiled and signed o by the president.

Federal funding allotment is determined.

SOURCES: AUSTINTRAVIS COUNTY COMPLETE COUNT COMMITTEE, CITY OF AUSTIN, U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

A statistic often cited—by elected ocials, journal- ists and residents alike—is the number of people who move to the ve-county Austin-Round Rock metro, which includes Hays County, each day. It is 105, on average, according to the Greater Aus- tin Chamber of Commerce. neighborhoods in which they put down roots? For each person uncounted during the decennial census, a community loses $1,500 in federal funding each year, according to estimates from the U.S. Cen- sus Bureau. Federal funding for myriad programs—such as CONTINUED ON 26 Without state funding, local organizers strive to reach hard-to-count communities This net migration is one of many challenges facing census workers and organizers. Where will the approximately 105 people moving on Census Day—April 1—count themselves residents? Will it be where funding is needed for the congested roads they drive on, the under-enrolled schools they may send their kids to and the ood-prone BY EMMA FREER AND ALI LINAN

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up-to-date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

HAYS COUNTY FOODBANK

21

NOW OFFERING A COMPLETE REMOTE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE WE ARE OPEN! WE DELIVER TO YOU!

SANMARCOSDODGE.COM

CHECK OUT OUR SPECIALS AT

2020 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT 4X4

2020 RAM 1500 LONESTAR 4X2

WHEN FINANCED THROUGH CHRYSLER CAPITAL NO MONTHLY PAYMENTS DAYS 90 FOR *0% APR FOR 84 MONTHS

2020 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED WILLY SPORT MSRP. $ 42,630 .DEALER DISCOUNT $2,500. REBATE $2,868. EQUALS $ 37,262 PLUS T.T.&L STOCK # C00093

2020 RAM 1500 LONESTAR 4X2 MSRP. $42,910. DEALER DISCOUNT $ 7,161 REBATE $5,750. EQUALS $ 29,999 PLUS T.T &L STOCK #C00011

2020 GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED

2020 JEEP CHEROKEE LATITUDE

2020 JEEP CHEROKEE LATITUDE MSRP. $27,450. DEALER DISCOUNT $4,454. REBATE $1,750. EQUALS $21,276 PLUS T.T.&L STOCK #C00070

2020 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED MSRP. $35,585. DEALER DISCOUNT $5,496 REBATE $3,250. EQUALS $26,839 PLUS T.T.&L STOCK #C00230

Oil Change • Tire Rotation (Single, Rear Only) Replace Fuel Filters Expires 6/15/2020 DIESEL SPECIAL $349

10% off When you spend over $100 Discount Applicable up to $500 Expires 6/15/2020 CULTIVATING OUR COMMUNITY

* 1/2 PRICE ON DIAGNOSTIC FEE THRU MAY 15*

* BUY 1 OIL CHANGE AND GET NEXT ONE FREE (must be on same vehicle) Offer Expires 6/15/2020

For all your serviceneeds,Wewill pickupanddeliver your vehicleback toyou sanitized

Come visit Buford! “WE HAVE THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF CERTIFICATION IN DIESEL, TRANSMISSION AND ENGINE REPAIRS” CHECK OUT OUR NEW SERVICE DOMAINS! SERVICEMYJEEP.COM • SERVICEMYRAM.COM • SERVICEMYDODGE.NET “WE TREAT YOU LIKE FAMILY”

SALES: 888.688.0589 2990 I-35 SOUTH SAN MARCOS, TX 78666

SanMarcosDodge.com

*IMAGES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY

2

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

• 800 acres of dedicated open space and park land • Close proximity to Texas State University, business, shopping and entertainment • 45-acre Central Park recreation space • Desirable location off IH-35 between Austin and San Antonio • Resort-caliber amenities and playgrounds • 10+ miles of trails NEW HOMES FROM THE $280’S

1/4-ACRE SITES AVAILABLE NOW! LACIMATX.COM

# T hanks M om!

512-337-6093

512-834-9294

512-569-0095

3

SAN MARCOS - BUDA - KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

Open for all your imaging. Whether it’s essential imaging or routine screenings, ARA keeps you safe while you take care of your health. You can count on ARA to do a great job while taking comprehensive measures to protect you from coronavirus, so don’t put off your imaging. SCHEDULE NOW! CALL (512) 453-6100 ONLINE at ausrad.com/scheduing

Welcome back! ARA is fully operational for screenings and all other imaging.

HIGH QUALITY TEACHERS IN EVERY CLASSROOM 3 Our teachers create joyful environments in every classroom and help students maximize their developmental strengths and curiosity.

BUILDING READING ANDMATHMASTERY 1 Your child will become a fluent and accurate reader. They will also develop their math skills by learning their numbers, their shapes, how to count, add, and subtract.

FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS 2 We work together with families through community events, parent teacher conferences, and progress trackers to ensure students are growing into scholars.

KINDERGARTEN SPOTS AVAILABLE AT IDEA BLUFF SPRINGS ideapublicschools.org/apply 1700 E. Slaughter Lane Austin, Texas 78744 • (512) 822-4200 • Grades K – 10

4

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

IMPACTS

6

Now Open, Coming Soon &more

PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett PUBLISHERAUSTINMETRO Travis Baker GENERAL MANAGER Vicki Hayes, vhayes@communityimpact.com EDITORIAL EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Lanane MANAGING EDITOR Joe Warner ASSOCIATEMANAGING EDITOR Amy Denney REPORTER Evelin Garcia COPY CHIEF Andy Comer COPY EDITORS Ben Dickerson, Kasey Salisbury ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Adrian Martinez DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Haley Grace GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rachal Russell STAFF DESIGNER Shelby Savage BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Claire Love ABOUT US John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, Texas. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. CONTACT US 16225 Impact Way, Ste. 1 Pugerville, TX 78660 • 5129896808 communityimpact.com PRESS RELEASES sbknews@communityimpact.com SUBSCRIPTIONS communityimpact.com/subscriptions © 2020 Community Impact Newspaper Co. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction of any portion of this issue is allowed without written permission from the publisher.

FROMVICKI: Welcome to May! Are you all tired … just tired of being at home, tired of being cooped up, tired of COVID-19, just tired? Yeah, me too! I am a people person; I also like my alone time, but I have come to realize what I really like is being alone in a crowd. I am ready, just like many of you, for life to come back to normal. Make no mistake, our normal is going to look completely dierent than it did before we ever heard the term coronavirus or COVID-19. In this edition we are going to update you on what “normal” will look like and who and when business that we all love (think hairdressers, nail salons and dog groomers) will open in a safe manner. I hope you will also appreciate the little things, like truly going out for a nice sit-down dinner, taking a walk in the park anytime you want or how hard your child’s teacher works with limited resources. I urge all of you to shop the advertisers we have in this and every edition of Community Impact Newspaper . Now, more than ever, they need your support. It is a new day! Stay well; remain vigilant; and we will get through this.

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 11 Texas crash numbers are lower, but fatalities remain steady during coronavirus orders EDUCATION 15 Texas State oers student support CITY& COUNTY 17 The latest local news

Vicki Hayes, GENERALMANAGER

WHAT’S NEWAT COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER ? CUSTOMDIGITAL CAMPAIGNS FOR ADVERTISERS Our online partnership includes more value with record-breaking content and readership and exible weekly ad schedules. communityimpact.com/advertise

DAILY LOCAL NEWSLETTER Sign up to receive daily headlines directly to your inbox. communityimpact.com/ newsletter

EEDITIONS Explore over 100 new interactive digital editions at communityimpact.com .

BUSINESS FEATURE Twinty Photography NONPROFIT Hays County Food Bank IMPACT DEALS

19

21

29

Local coupons

Proudly printed by

communityimpact.com

@impactnews_sbk

facebook.com/impactnewssbk

P E D I A T R I C S

CommuniCareSA.org B O O K A P P P O I N T M E N T O N L I N E

I MMU N I Z AT I O N S , WE L L - C H I L D V I S I T S , A D H D C A R E , C O L D / F L U C A R E , & MO R E

K Y L E • S A N M A R C O S • W I M B E R L E Y

5

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

BUSINESS INNOVATION

Local business owners adapt to coronavirus restrictions

SanMarcos, Buda and Kyle businesses cautious as they reopen during pandemic

CASES CONTINUE TO RISE

BY EVELIN GARCIA

that will continue to keep its dine-in area closed for now. According to owner Mayra Calderon, “it’s too soon” to open and “people are scared to get sick. “For the safety of our employees and our clients, we have decided to just keep doing delivery and to-go orders,” Calderon said. “We don’t want anyone to get sick.” Calderon said her decision to keep her doors closed was shared with many neighboring restau- rant owners in her area. Calderon said she will weigh her options again in a week [from May 1]. Other restaurants like Brooklyn’s Down South in Buda have decided to stay closed until safety procedures are in place for customers and employ- ees, according to Steven Maldonado, bar manager at Brooklyn’s Down South. “We just want to make sure everything is done right or in the best way,” Maldonado said. “We want to put procedures in place and just be safe for our employees and our guests.” According to Maldonado, the owners at Brook- lyn’s Down South have plans to reopen after Mother’s Day but only on certain days and only for dinner and with reservations. Though all business owners are wary of

More than a month after the economic shut- down, business owners in San Marcos, Buda and Kyle wrestle with keeping their doors closed or choosing to reopen at reduced capacity per Gov. Greg Abbott’s new executive order that took eect May 1. On April 27, Abbott issued the order that allows retail stores, movie theaters, restaurants and malls to reopen at 25% occupancy, the rst phase of a statewide plan intended to spur a battered economy during the coronavirus pandemic. For Spencer Thomas, owner of The Texas Pie Co. in Kyle, the choice was clear: Keep the doors closed. “We’re not really convinced that it is safe [to open],” Thomas said. “We have chosen to only continue takeout and curbside.” Thomas said he believes allowing limited occupancy in his establishment would only cause additional burdens. “It requires us to be more vigilant as far as sanita- tion, which we already are all the time, but it’s extra requirements, and we would need more people [to implement that] than we need just for takeout.” Los Vaqueros Cafe in Kyle is another restaurant

A comparison of Hays County conrmed coronavirus cases from March 15-May 3:

MARCH 15 0 MARCH22 5 MARCH29 13 APRIL 5

50

APRIL 12

82

APRIL 19

109

APRIL 26

148

MAY 3

FOOD TRUCKS

CAFEONTHESQUARE

168

Several food trucks saw more customers as they oered limited seating.

Some outdoor seating was available at restaurants in SanMarcos.

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Open to the Public 2521 S IH-35 San Marcos, TX 78666 @smtxrestore Discount Home Improvement Store and Donation Center

Good things happen when you donate to the ReStore

When you donate your items, we build homes.

6

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

coronavirus with customers and employees, some have decided to open with safety precautions. Amy Krell, owner of Ellipsis Boutique, a cloth- ing store in Buda, said she is excited to return to business. “I mainly decided to be open because it was deemed that retails stores could, so I was ready to get my doors back open and welcome in customers as safely as we can,” Krell said. Customers at Ellipsis Boutique will be required to wear a face mask before entering the store, and a hand sanitizing station will be available for their use. Krell said she will provide face masks for customers who are not already wearing one. Popular restaurants in San Marcos, such as CRAFThouse Kitchen & Tap and Cody’s Restaurant Bar, have announced via social channels that they, too, are open at 25% capacity following Abbott’s May 1 order. Residents in San Marcos shared split opinions about Abbott’s decision to reopen a limited variety of businesses. In response to Community Impact Newspaper ’s Facebook post, Brianne Castle, a resident in San Marcos, said she will continue to stay home and order food to-go despite some businesses opening their dine-in areas. “The reason we’ve been fairly lucky with cases is that social distancing was working. We’re just getting it under control, it seems, and we are opening up. I think we’ll see a spike from Easter and now for sure with opening up prematurely,” Castle said. “I pray I’m wrong, and I hope those who are brave enough to go out and about stay safe and healthy.” Shaun Segard told Community Impact Newspaper that reopening businesses was a good thing. “This is great news,” Segard said. “We were never meant to close down until a cure was found, and closing down thinking we can wait the virus out isn’t possible. It’s a virus, it won’t go away. Only immunity will take care of the problem.” Editor’s note: Updates on businesses and the impact on coronavirus are available at communityimpact.com between issues of the newspa- per. Impacts will return in the June edition.

CRAFTHOUSE KITCHEN&TAP Texas businesses, including CRAFThouse Kitchen & Tap in San Marcos, were allowed to reopen to 25% capacity May 1. If successful, Gov. Greg Abbott said the next step would be 50% on May 18.

SANTI'S TACOS Cars were lined up as Santi’s Tacos delivered curbside orders May 2.

TEXAS PIE CO. Texas Pie Co. in Kyle did not reopenMay 1, sticking to takeout and curbside services.

southaustinvein.com 512-614-1025

BEFORE

AFTER

DO YOU SUFFER FROM:

• LEG PAIN • ACHING

• SWELLING • BULGING VEINS • CRAMPING • RESTLESS LEG • SPIDER VEINS

• THROBBING • HEAVINESS • FATIGUE

MOST TREATMENTS ARE COVERED BY INSURANCE!

Dr. Michael M. Di Iorio Founder & Medical Director

We accept ALL major insurances including Medicare. Se habla Espa ñ ol.

NOW SEEING PATIENTS AT 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: SOUTH AUSTIN & BASTROP

7

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

BUSINESSINNOVATIONS

Local business owners adapt to coronavirus restrictions

Sportswear company mass produces masks

S and Socks Inc., a small beach sportswear company in Buda, has altered its busi- ness model to oer fabric masks for individuals and in bulk during the coronavirus pandemic. The business of 6 employees has been in the area for 11 years, moving from southwest Austin to Buda in 2015. The economic hit to the small company allowed for a new revenue stream, and the ability to give back with the donation of hundreds of masks to frontline workers through- out Hays County. With the growing demand for masks for many in the community, Sand Socks has begun utilizing its sportswear expertise to produce masks, which are available on the company’s website. The facemasks are not medically BY EVELIN GARCIA

certied but they are made with layers of heavy fabrics like spandex and polyester that help provide protection and comfort, according to a release sent by Sand Socks. To help those ghting the pandemic from the front line, Sand Socks has donated over 1,500 masks to rst responders including the Buda, Kyle and San Marcos police departments, local post oces, doctor’s oces, and local clinics. In addition, the growing demand for face masks is allowing the company to expand its sta with full-time and part-time positions in sales and in warehouse personnel. The company encourages Hays County residents to apply for jobs with the company. For more information or to donate for mask production, which the company will match, visit www.sandsocks.net/masks-and-gear.

Small businesses in Buda may be eligible for grant funding.

• Rent/mortgage • Employee support (salaries, insurance, paid leave) • Utilities • Purchase of supplies to oer alternative access • Additional expenses due to increase costs from suppliers • Other business needs approved by the Small Business Task Force

FUNDS FOR THE PROGRAM CAN SUPPORT:

APPLY ONLINE AT: WWW.CI.BUDA.TX.US665STILLBUDAFULSTIMULUS

Still Budaful has funding available for businesses

• Protection • Comfort • Durability • Breathability MASKS FEATURE:

B uda small business owners can still apply for a one-time grant for up to $5,000 as part of the Still Budaful small business stimulus grant program that started in April. Funding is available to businesses with a maximum of 50 employees. “I am happy to report grant monies are still available,” Buda Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director J.R. Gonzales reported to BY JOE WARNER

chamber members. “If your business is within Buda’s city limits, is regis- tered with the Texas State Comptrol- ler and is in good standing with the city of Buda, you may qualify.” The program was supported by the city council and launched on April 7. More than $150,000 was awarded so far with the program. Total con- tributions for Still Budaful approved by the city council and the Buda Economic Development Corporation are $380,000.

SAND SOCKS 5381 Industrial Way Drive, Buda 5125471019 www.sandsocks.net

GREAT AUTO LOANS Enjoy No Payments for 90 Days!

With rates as low as 1.79%

Buying a car just isn’t about the color, or the features or gas mileage. It’s finding the right fit. It’s about the joy ride. Personalized service and a great low rate, plus, you’ll get a $25 reward card when you finance with us!

APR*

Apply today! gtfcu.org

*APR is annual percentage rate. Terms & conditions apply.

8

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BY EVELIN GARCIA The business of giving back to the community J oshua and Xavier Olabarrieta, the co-owners of The Coee Box in Kyle, have reshaped

those who needed them most. The free meal oered at the food truck, also known as the “brown bag special,” is the latest addition to the menu. It comes with a ham and cheese sandwich, a bag of chips, a side of fruit and a water bottle. Though the community is encouraged to come as often as they need to, the brown bag special is limited to one bag per person per day. All those in need of a free meal just need to ask for a brown bag special at the register, and no additional questions will be asked. “Putting aside the struggles this virus has put on us and our busi- ness, we are reminded that we are still fortunate to be alive, so why not help those who are less fortu- nate,” Joshua said. The brown bag special is a menu item Joshua intends to have beyond the coronavirus pandemic.

the way they do business by giving food to those who need it the most, an act of compassion brought by the coronavirus pandemic but intended to be implemented beyond it. “Even when the monetary prot is not there, something bigger is: the prot of compassion and com- ing together as a community, of still making those who come to my little food truck smile,” Joshua said. The Coee Box, a food truck spe- cializing in coee and other food items, was one of the many local businesses aected by the corona- virus pandemic, but Joshua said he was worried more about the food insecurity the outbreak had caused in the community than his prots and decided to give free meals to

Owners of The Coee Box have been giving 2530 free meals per week.

BROWN BAG SPECIAL One local business plans to continue to help the community with brown bag specials which includes: • Ham & cheese sandwich • Bag of chips • Side of fruit • Water

THE COFFEE BOX 1101 Bunton Creek Road, Kyle 5128501530 www.facebook.com/ TheCoeeBox512 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sun. Closed

Leasing Office is Now Open and Accepting Reservations

OPENING SUMMER 2020. CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE A VIRTUAL TOUR.

Welcome home to Sage Spring Senior Living; a vibrant, welcoming senior living campus that is coupled with exceptional, personalized care in the heart of San Marcos, Texas. Our exquisite neighborhood strives to provide premier, tailored programming that will leave you feeling recharged, energized and stress-free. Our priority is to create a blend of relaxation, privacy, security and community for all our residents. Come and reap the luxurious rewards of Sage Spring Senior Living and embrace a celebration of life.

800 Leah Ave San Marcos 78666 • 512-270-8668 • www.sagespringseniorliving.com

9

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

10

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Fatality numbers still high despite 11%-15% fewer crashes in 2020 Trac fatalities on roads through- out Texas have continued at roughly the same pace in 2020 despite major Texas metros seeing a drop in the number of reported crashes and trac volumes.

BY AMY DENNEY & JOE WARNER

ONGOING PROJECTS

CENTRAL TEXAS CRASHES These are the number of crashes reported to the Texas Department of Transportation from Jan. 1-April 15 each year by local law enforcement agencies. The numbers do not include crashes currently under investigation.

2018 2019 2020

N C M ALLEN PKWY.

CM Allen Parkway reconstruction Approaching completion of the $2.8 million project that reopened to trac in December; minor nishes from Hop- kins St. to University Drive Timeline: August 2018-June 2020

Between Jan. 1 and April 15, the number of trac crashes dropped between 11% and 15% in 2020 compared to the same time period in 2019 in the Austin, Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston metros, according to an April 21 analysis of Texas Department of Transportation data by Community Impact Newspaper . However, data from TxDOT shows the number of trac fatalities has dropped by 3.35% in the same time period in 2020 compared to 2019. TxDOT’s Crash Records Informa- tion System denotes the number of trac fatalities between Jan. 1 and

Williamson County

Comal County

Guadalupe County

Hays County

Travis County

MOORE ST.

SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CRASH RECORDS INFORMATION SYSTEMCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

roadways is achievable,” she said. “Unfortunately, we’re not there yet. Despite the drop in trac and despite the drop in crashes in certain areas across the state we are still seeing trac deaths.” Beyer said analysis of the contrib- uting factors showed many accidents were preventable, caused by texting while driving or drunken driving.

April 15 declined from 865 deaths in 2019 to 836 during the same time period in 2020. Veronica Beyer, director of media relations for TxDOT, said the agency reported 12 fatalities Feb. 22 and 11 fatalities on March 22 when the state was under stay-at-home orders. “We’ve always believed that ending the streak of daily deaths on Texas

35

N

Hopkins Street improvements, Bishop to Moore streets

Begins this summer with detours; replaces water infrastructure, adds drainage and reconstructs street, curbs and sidewalks for $10.1 million Timeline: summer 2020-summer 2022

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF APRIL 21. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SBKNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

NOW PROVIDING Telehealth visits

Call 512.443.9715 to schedule

SPECIALIZING IN: Helping You See Clearly • Premium IOL Implants • Cataract Surgery • LASIK Surgery • Glaucoma - Medical and Surgical • Macular Degeneration

Kyle Office 5401 FM 1626, Ste 365 Kyle, TX 78640

Southwest Austin Office 5625 Eiger Rd., Ste 100 Austin, TX 78735

South Central Austin Office 2610 S. IH 35 Austin, TX 78704

Schedule Your Visit Today: (512) 443-9715 www.howertoneye.com

11

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

Get instant listing alerts, save your favorites, share comments with your co-buyer and see sold prices on the new realtyaustin.com.

realtyaustin.com/p/2280764

realtyaustin.com/p/9745865

$565,000

$535,000

4 bds

4 ba

2,852 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

2,637 sq ft

432 Sapling Dr, Driftwood, TX 78619 Stephanie Collins | 512-740-1046

16227 Bull Whip Pass, Buda, TX 78610 Cristina Valdes | 512-843-3572

realtyaustin.com/p/7654609

realtyaustin.com/p/6374844

$460,000

$365,000

4 bds

4 ba

2,800 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,068 sq ft

252 Gable St, Kyle, TX 78640 James Jarvis | 512-626-6657

13316 Mariscan St, Manchaca, TX 78652 Blanca Monarrez | 831-359-2141

realtyaustin.com/p/7224433

realtyaustin.com/p/6122354

$360,000

$329,000

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,068 sq ft

3 bds

2 ba

2,256 sq ft

13209 Mariscan St, Manchaca, TX 78652 Denise DeJardo | 512-944-5179

825 Clear Springs Holw, Buda, TX 78610 Darcy Newton | 512-997-8886

realtyaustin.com/p/2524891

realtyaustin.com/p/2978804

The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed lives across the world, including many here in Central Texas. To help your neighbors experiencing financial hardships due to COVID-19, you can donate to provide electric bill assistance. You can help a fellow member! Donate to the PEC COVID-19 Relief Fund

$320,000

$310,000

4 bds

2 ba

1,808 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,373 sq ft

26 Ridgewood Cir, Wimberley, TX 78676 Mark Alexander | 512-800-4443

384 Vista Gardens Dr, Buda, TX 78610 Lisa Muñoz | 512-856-4549

realtyaustin.com/p/5764365

realtyaustin.com/p/4150291

Learn how you can donate at pec.coop/covid-19-resources.

$299,500

$280,000

5 bds

3 ba

2,500 sq ft

4 bds

2.5 ba 2,490 sq ft

1012 Dailey St, San Marcos, TX 78666 Jean Holm | 512-766-3671

606 Hot Spring Vly, Buda, TX 78610 Lori Kelly | 512-576-9047

Pedernales Electric Cooperative

12

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

INSIDE INFORMATION Residents are encouraged to wear cloth face coverings or medical grade masks over the nose and mouth when performing most activities out of the home. If you have not been able to buy masks, here is a guide to make your own cloth masks at home. Please refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov for more guidelines. Facing the facts

Coping with coronavirus

COMPILED BY DANICA SMITHWICK & MATT DULIN

DO

DON'T

WHY SHOULD I WEAR A MASK? Many coronavirus cases lack symptoms or develop symptoms later on in the diagnosis, so individuals might not know they have or are transmitting the disease. The virus can spread during interactions such as speaking, coughing or sneezing.

• Cover your mouth and nose in public even if you are not experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 or interacting with someone who is experiencing symptoms. • Wash masks in hot water before the rst use and between uses. • Wear a mask when in public places such as grocery stores, at medical appointments and accessing other essential services. • Replace masks when they get damp.

• Use surgical masks or N-95 respirators, as these critical supplies should be reserved for health care professionals. • Ignore calls for social distancing of 6 feet between persons. • Forget to wash hands frequently as well as before putting on a mask. • Reuse single-use masks.

HOW TO MAKE A MASK AT HOME Cloth face coverings can be crafted from household items such as fabric, scarves, bandanas, hand towels, T-shirts and rubber bands or hair ties.

STEP 4: Fold fabric to the middle from both sides and tuck the sides in.

STEP 5: Attach each rubber band to either ear, ensuring the mouth and nose are completely covered.

STEP 3: Place a rubber band on each side of the fabric.

STEP 2: Fold fabric to the middle from the top and bottom.

STEP 1: Fold fabric to the middle from the bottom.

CORRECT

6 inches apart

NOT CORRECT

SOURCES: CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, HARRIS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTHCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

The federal government’s phased reopening guidelines leaves broad discretion to governors and local governments to manage the gradual return to normalcy. The federal plan is based on states committing to implementing a series of required resources and reaching a checkpoint before implementing each new phase. Phasing back to normal

PHASE 1 • Vulnerable populations should continue to shelter in place. • Social settings of more than 10 people should be avoided unless social distancing is practical. • Minimize nonessential travel and work from home if possible. • Workplaces should implement special accommodations to protect vulnerable populations that must work on-site. • Schools, day cares and camps should remain closed. • Senior living facilities should be closed to visitors. • Larger venues—restaurants, movie theaters, sporting venues and places of worship—can begin to operate under strict physical distancing protocols. • Elective surgeries can resume in some facilities. • Gyms that implement strict physical distancing and sanitation protocols can reopen. • Bars should remain closed.

PHASE2 • Social settings of more than 50 people should be avoided unless social distancing is practical. • Nonessential travel can resume, but working from home is still encouraged. • Schools, day cares and camps can reopen. • Larger venues can begin to operate under moderate physical distancing protocols. • Bars may begin to operate with reduced occupancy levels.

PHASE3 • Vulnerable populations can begin to have public interactions but should

Requirementsprior to implementingPhase 1

Testing/tracing: States must be able to provide screening and testing sites and implement contact- tracing strategies of positive COVID-19 cases. States must also have screening and tracing for asymptomatic cases. Hospital capacity: States must ensure its health care system has a supply of personal protective equipment and other critical equipment to handle surges, including intensive care unit bed capacity. Planning: States must protect the health and safety of critical industries, those in high-risk facilities such as senior care centers, and must protect mass- transit systems. States must be able to monitor conditions and immediately respond to changes in conditions should cases spike.

practice distancing and avoid social situations where that may not be practical. • Unrestricted stang at work sites may resume. • Visits to senior care facilities can resume. • Larger venues can operate under more limited distancing protocols. • Bars may begin to operate with increased occupancy levels.

Conditions to begin each newphase With a 14-day period, the following conditions must be met before a new phase is triggered: Symptoms: A reduction of new inuenza-like illnesses and a reduction in COVID-19-like cases reported Cases: A slowing of documented cases or a reduction in the percentage of positive tests out of total tests, assuming a at or increasing volume of tests Hospitals: All patients can be treated without crisis care, and a testing program for at-risk workers must be in place

SOURCE: WHITE HOUSE COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

13

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

Buy a new home with natural gas appliances to enjoy CLEAN, AFFORDABLE ENERGY FOR YEARS TO COME. Natural gas saves more than just energy - it delivers affordable comfort. A natural gas furnace gets you and your home warmer and quicker too. And heating water with natural gas means more hot water at up to 62% less cost than with electricity. Plus, spending less on energy leaves you with more money for upgrades like those countertops that help turn your new home into your dream home. To find a natural gas home builder near you, visit CenterPointEnergy.com/GasHome.

Moving is

COSTLY

But your energy bills DON'T HAVE TO BE.

14

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION BRIEFS

News from Texas State University, Hays & San Marcos CISDs

Texas State grant funding oers $30M in aid to students

Newhot spots coming toSMCISDstudents

BY EVELIN GARCIA

SANMARCOS CISD San Marcos CISD board members approved the purchase of an additional 100 Wi-Fi hot spots for students who need them at an April 20 meeting. Texas ISDs will continue remote classroom instruction for the rest of the 2019-20 school year. The hot spots will cost the district $16,500, according to the SMCISD board book. Previously, the district had authorized the pur- chase of 500 hot spots for students with no internet access as it moved forward with online instruction due to the pandemic.

BY JOE WARNER

TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY The university has extended application deadlines for rst-year students and for its Bobcat Cares Emergency Fund, which oers assistance to students who have had economic hardships due to coronavirus. The fund features $30 million in student assistance, with $15 million in federal emergency funding through the Higher Education Emer- gency Relief Fund and the coronavirus relief bill. Funding will help part- and full-time students oset the costs related to tuition, fees, housing, food, technology and course materials, according to information from the university. Grants will not aect future nancial aid or be applied to outstanding balances to the university. Awards will be based on need and the number of students who apply. Application deadlines for rst-year, transfer and international students have been extended. Details and online applications are available at www.txstate.edu.

Coronavirus closed the campus of Texas State University in April. (Joe Warner/Community Impact Newspaper)

The Bobcat Cares program oers grant funding for students for tuition, fees, housing, food, technology and course materials. RELIEF Student

38,000 undergraduates available to apply

$30 MILLION total funding $15 MILLION from CARES Act

200 bachelor’s, master’s and

doctoral programs

SanMarcos CISD approved another 100 hotspots for students. (Evelin Garcia/Community Impact Newspaper)

SOURCE: TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

Board talks$37M projectwithdeveloper

Online studieswill nish school year SANMARCOS CISDANDHAYS CISD San Marcos CISD and Hays CISD will continue in-home learn- ing for the remainder of the 2019-20 BY EVELIN GARCIA In a statement, SMCISD Superintendent Michael Cardona announced that the district will “focus on our planning for the reopening of school in August” and work with teachers and students to make up for any lost learning. school year, following Gov. Greg Abbott’s order to close schools.

incorporate CCHSM into a complex that would serve as the district’s headquarters. The complex would be shared by both entities. In addition, an income-restricted housing com- plex would be developed. The cost of the project would be paid by the developer in the amount of $37 million. The income-restricted housing complex would create 176 apartment units reserved for residents making 30%-70% of the area median income. Future discussions are planned.

BY EVELIN GARCIA

SANMARCOS CISD Streamline Advisory Partners, a privately owned development company, held a presentation April 20 for San Marcos CISD board members to discuss the possibility of developing the district property located at 211 Lee St., San Marcos—home to the nonprot Centro Cultural Hispano de San Marcos—into a mixed-used complex. The proposed development would

Aaron Loyd to become next Barton principal

BY JOE WARNER

and well,” Superintendent Eric Wright said in a statement. “We are excited that he will be at the helm. He has been part of the Barton Middle School family for seven years. Students, parents and the community know and respect him. He is the perfect t to lead the campus during the next chapter.” Loyd earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin and a master’s degree from Lamar University in Beaumont.

Hays CISD May 18 and May 28 at 5:30 p.m. www.hayscisd.net/site/ Default.aspx?PageID=194 512-268-2141 • www.hayscisd.net San Marcos CISD May 18 and June 15 at 6 p.m. www.smcisd.net/domain/159 512-393-6700 • www.smcisd.net VIRTUALMEETINGS WE COVER

HAYS CISD The Hays CISD board of trustees named Aaron Loyd the new principal at Barton Middle School at its April 20 meeting. Loyd, the current assistant principal at Barton, will replace Teri Eubank to begin the 2020-21 school year. Eubank will retire after a 33-year career in education, the last eight as principal at Barton. “Aaron is going to keep the Bobcat tradition of success alive

Mixed-use project pitched for SCHOOL PROPERTY

CENTRO CULTURAL HISPANO DE SAN MARCOS

35

N

15

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

Walk or bicycle along a beautiful, 4.5-mile paved path with a story to tell. Located near the 45SW Toll Road southwest of downtown, the 10-foot wide 45SW Trail is filled with captivating signs that detail the history, environmental importance and natural wonders of the Hill Country.

The Trail Explorer by CTRMA app makes learning fun. Experience wonders like watching a prehistoric sea creature come to life on the 45SW Trail, with the app’s augmented reality features. Download for free today!

Visit MobilityAuthority.com/45SWTrail to learn more!

16

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY& COUNTY

News from San Marcos, Buda, Kyle and Hays County

QUOTEOFNOTE “MAYBE THERE ARE THINGSWE CANDO TO PROVIDE IMMEDIATE RELIEF TO THOSE WHONEED IT.” LON SHELL, HAYS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COURT DISTRICT 3 the second phase outlined by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott. Retail, restaurants, malls and theaters were allowed to open May 1 at 25% capacity. 18 NUMBER TOKNOW May 18 is the next key date in opening Texas through CITY HIGHLIGHTS HAYS COUNTY The county anticipates a higher number of absentee voters starting with the July 14 runo election. Jennifer Anderson, Hays County elections administrator and voter registrar, said the county needs to nd a larger election facility, new voting sites to replace schools and senior centers, and safety items for voters and volunteers. KYLE City Council honored the work of the Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center, which has continued to provide help to a higher of number of victims of abuse and assault during coronavirus. The center is still available to help Hays County residents 24/7. SANMARCOS The city’s brush drop-o and community cleanup for residential garbage customers will be 8 a.m.-1 p.m. on June 13 and July 11 at 750 River Road, behind the animal shelter. Previous events were canceled due to coronavirus. San Marcos City Council Meets rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. Online meeting 512-393-8000 www.sanmarcostx.gov Kyle City Council Meets rst and third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. Online meeting 512-262-1010 • www.cityoyle.com Buda City Council Meets rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. • Online meeting 512-312-0084 • www.ci.buda.tx.us Hays County Commissioners Court Meets Tuesdays at 9 a.m. Online meeting 512-393-2205 • www.co.hays.tx.us MEETINGSWE COVER

County seeks nancial assistance

Cite-and-release lawbegins in San Marcos onMay 31

BY JOE WARNER

session that would modify the tax code and take some of the burden o homeowners during the federally and locally declared disaster. The proclamation also asks for tax payment extensions and relaxing late fees and interest. District 3 Commissioner Lon Shell agreed on the resolution to call for a special session but said supporting groups that are helping residents get through the coronavirus should be an immediate goal for Hays County.

HAYS COUNTY A nancial ask from Hays County Judge Ruben Becerra and supported 5-0 by the Commissioners Court will move to legislators and ocials in Austin. The resolution, approved April 28, calls for nancial relief for Hays County residents through property reappraisals and revaluations due to the economic eects of the corona- virus. The resolution also asks the governor to call a special legislative

BY EVELIN GARCIA

SANMARCOS In April, San Marcos became the rst city in Texas to adopt a cite-and-release policy as law for certain low- level oenses. “There’s a lot of concern in this community that we weren’t lis- tening to enough people; and by my count, we had about 51 oppo- sition emails and about 172 emails in support of this ordinance, not a resolution, so I am proud to vote ‘yes’ for this ordinance,” Council Member Maxeld Baker said before casting his vote in favor of the ordinance. San Marcos City Council members voted 4-3 on April 21 to approve the cite-and-release ordinance that is slated to take eect May 31. Cite-and-release, in which a law-enforcement ocer issues a ticket for a court appearance instead of taking someone into custody, was rst proposed by Mano Amiga—a grassroots nonprot in Hays County. The ordinance supports increased use of the cite-and- release process in appropriate circumstances, including misde- meanors such as possession of less than 4 ounces of marijuana, driving with an invalid license and grati, among others, but excluding Class C misdemeanors for public intoxication, assault or family violence.

Ocer Justin Putnam’s scout car is a memorial in front of City Hall.

Fund set for SanMarcos police officers

BY JOE WARNER

on April 21. Discussion will continue in May about the need for an elec- tion to help fund additional projects in the city. A bond election calendar listed step-by-step timelines for a May 2021, November 2021 or May 2022 election, which includes developing preliminary designs, creating a bond committee, city workshops and ordering the election 78 days prior to the election date. More than a dozen projects are up for discussion. for the three ocers and their families. Online donations may be made at www.smcpaaa.org/ donations-putnam-mueller-stewart. Putnam graduated from Texas State University and was a member of the San Marcos Police Department since Nov. 3, 2014. He was engaged to be married. His father was a veteran of the Austin Fire Department.

SANMARCOS A fund has been set to help the families of three ocers shot during a domestic violence call April 18. Ocer Justin Putnam was killed in the ambush attack. Ocers Franco Stewart and Justin Mueller are recovering from critical wounds. A fundraiser has been organized

POSSIBLE PROJECTS Buda City Council discussed several projects possibly tagged for the future bond election:

Buda looks at bond election for projects

Garrison Park development

$4 MILLION

BY JOE WARNER

BUDA The city will look to residents to help fund multiple projects for millions of dollars in the coming years after six years of improvements from a 2014 voter referendum. Deputy City Manager Micah Grau oered options for a future general obligation bond for the city of Buda

Recreation and aquatic center $8.08 MILLION Public works facility $6.75 MILLION Old Black Colony Road construction $5 MILLION SOURCE: CITY OF BUDA COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

17

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

Our doctors, nurses and care teams are in this with you, always

Your care is important. Don’t delay the important care you need, even at this time. We’re making sure our ERs, hospitals, clinics and facilities are safe and ready for you and your family when you need care. And we have more appointment options — both in-person and virtual visits.

Get the care you need at GetSetonCare.com.

© Ascension 2020. All rights reserved.

Community * Austin TOP 5

awesome

amenities

lifestyle

amazing

*2019 RCLCO

Unplug and get outside on miles of walking trails that meander past catch and release ponds, play areas and dog parks. Our one-of-a-kind Lazy River Amenity Center features a 1,000 foot lazy river and the Sunbright Activity Center has a splash park and lap pool, with AMPLE shade for all. Visit us online today to see our community amenities, amazing builders and a list of Available Quick Move In Homes ! master-planned living south of austin from $ 200s CASTLEROCK • CENTEX • CHESMAR HOMES GEHAN HOMES • PULTE HOMES • TAYLOR MORRISON

austin

35

2001

buda

SunfieldTX.com

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

BUSINESS FEATURE Twinty Photography Twin sisters adapt business during coronavirus, support local food banks A n Austin metro business that has adapted through changes over the years continues to do so during the coronavirus pandemic. Twinty, a photography business owned by identical twin sisters, has changed from a for-prot into a business supporting nonprots during April and May. The Front Step Project sessions, a national eort to sup- port local communities, has temporarily replaced Twinty’s normal demand of weddings, senior photos and family portraits every spring. “We’re getting pictures of these families, the real them,” said April Hester of Buda, who co-owns Twinty with Amy Tondre, a resident of Austin. The sisters take appointments for photo shoots on the front porches of local residents, practicing safe distancing in a business that usually includes being close to people to line up just the right angle. As part of the program, they provide ve photos for free, only asking for a donation to a local food bank. The Central Texas Food Bank and Hays County Food Bank have received more than $5,100 in donations from 250 photo sessions done in the last two weeks by Hester and Tondre. Each session is approximately 10-15 minutes. “It is a dicult time for everybody; nobody knows what to expect,” Tondre said. “I feel like we are contributing when a lot of people aren’t able to. We are blessed we have some- thing to do to raise money.” Hester and Tondre, known as The Rankin Twins to coun- try music fans throughout Texas and beyond, have enjoyed bringing families some charitable joy during the struggle through the pandemic. “This has been rewarding for us to know that they truly love [the photos],” Hester said. “It’s in rare form. They may be dressed up; they might be in pajamas.” Area residents can set a brief appointment through May with Twinty Photography as part of the fundraiser. The team of sisters said it is a balance of their business, with children and husbands working at home, so hours are limited. “When we show up, people are so appreciative,” Hester said. “We love what we are doing.” BY JOE WARNER

Families pose on their porch or yards in sessions lasting 1015 minutes for the Front Step Project, which helps raise funds for local food banks. (Photos courtesy of Twinty Photography)

LIFETIME OF MEMORIES Twinty Photography oers dozens of options for photos and locations.

April Hester and Amy Tondre, also known as The Rankin Twins, are supporting local food banks through their photography work with their business, Twinty Photography.

Sessions include:

• boudoir • bridals • children & family • engagements • events • lifestyle

• maternity • mini sessions • newborns • seniors • weddings

Locations include:

Locations are unlimited. Some of the favorites of Twinty include:

• Hummingbird House • McKinney Falls State Park • Laguna Gloria • Austin Country Club • Bull Creek • Downtown Buda

• University of Texas campus • Lady Bird Johnson Wildower Center • South Congress • Prospect House

Twinty Photography Twinty Photography is not a storefront business. Photo sessions are taken in the community and at events. More information and appointments are available at www.twintyphotography.com.

“WE’RE GETTING PICTURES OF THESE FAMILIES, THE REAL THEM.” APRIL HESTER, TWINTY PHOTOGRAPHY

Medpark Hearing Center & San Marcos Ear, Nose and Throat

• Clean & check of your current hearing devices • Hearing screening FREE

512-353-8899 MedparkHearingCenter.com 2000 B&C Medical Parkway • San Marcos, TX 78666

Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp: 6/10/2020.

Edward Tomaneng, MD Ear, Nose &Throat Specialist

Anthony Atencio, HIS Hearing Instrument Specialist

19

SAN MARCOS  BUDA  KYLE EDITION • MAY 2020

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36

communityimpact.com

Powered by