San Marcos - Buda - Kyle | May 2020

SANMARCOS BUDA KYLE EDITION

VOLUME 10, ISSUE 1  MAY 11JUNE 7, 2020

ONLINE AT

Pandemic creates newera of online learning for local schools

Learning from home

The coronavirus pandemic has forced about 30,000 students in Hays County to nish the 2019-20 school year remotely.

BY EVELIN GARCIA

“A lot of us build our classrooms on relationships and those daily inter- actions that we take for granted, and that’s one of the hardest things for most of us,” said Michael Strunk, a 12th-grade teacher and coach at San Marcos High School. “Not being able to have those face-to-face interactions with our students and building those personal relationships [is dicult].” One of the biggest hurdles of remote instruction for Strunk has been bal- ancing new learning material under the present circumstances while “not CONTINUED ON 22

After the coronavirus pandemic brought classroom instruction to a halt for more than 28,100 students in Hays and San Macros CISDs, a new era of online teaching and learning was quickly, but not easily, adopted. The two local districts, after extend- ing spring breaks and moving reopen- ing goals, were directed to close for the remainder of the school year by Gov. Greg Abbott on April 17. It sent administrators, teachers, parents and students scrambling to pilot online education in unprecedented ways.

8,099 Students San Marcos CISD: 20,000+ Students Hays CISD:

Lincoln Hagerty, a kindergartner at San Marcos CISD, is one of the many students who

will be nishing the school year from home.

COURTESY MICHELLE HAGERTY

SOURCES: HAYS CISD, SAN MARCOS CISDCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

C E N S U S WO R K S H OW T H E

Data is distributed to states for redistricting.

Data from the census ultimately impacts state funding and representation. Here is how it gets there.

Mailers are distributed on how to complete the census.

Numerators, which are paid federal employees, knock on each door of unresponsive households to collect census information.

Census data is compiled and signed o by the president.

Federal funding allotment is determined.

SOURCES: AUSTINTRAVIS COUNTY COMPLETE COUNT COMMITTEE, CITY OF AUSTIN, U.S. CENSUS BUREAUCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

A statistic often cited—by elected ocials, journal- ists and residents alike—is the number of people who move to the ve-county Austin-Round Rock metro, which includes Hays County, each day. It is 105, on average, according to the Greater Aus- tin Chamber of Commerce. neighborhoods in which they put down roots? For each person uncounted during the decennial census, a community loses $1,500 in federal funding each year, according to estimates from the U.S. Cen- sus Bureau. Federal funding for myriad programs—such as CONTINUED ON 26 Without state funding, local organizers strive to reach hard-to-count communities This net migration is one of many challenges facing census workers and organizers. Where will the approximately 105 people moving on Census Day—April 1—count themselves residents? Will it be where funding is needed for the congested roads they drive on, the under-enrolled schools they may send their kids to and the ood-prone BY EMMA FREER AND ALI LINAN

CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

Please join your friends and neighbors in support of Community Impact Newspaper ’s legacy of local, reliable reporting by making a contribution. Any amount matters. Together, we can continue to ensure our citizens stay informed and keep our local businesses thriving. Become a #CommunityPatron

SUPPORT LOCAL JOURNALISM

All content in this print publication, both editorial and advertisements, was up-to-date as of the press deadline. Due to the fast-changing nature of this event, editorial and advertising information may have changed. Please visit communityimpact.com and advertiser websites for more information. Thanks for your support.

COMMUNITYIMPACT.COMPATRON

HAYS COUNTY FOODBANK

21

communityimpact.com

Powered by