Pearland - Friendswood Edition | September 2020

PEARLAND FRIENDSWOOD EDITION

ONLINE AT Local ISDs balance social distancing, bus routes with driver shortage Transportationdilemma 2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION VOLUME 6, ISSUE 10  SEPT. 11OCT. 8, 2020 BY HALEY MORRISON

Pearland, Alvin and Friendswood ISDs have eased into the 2020-21 school year, though much is still unknown for the year. Both Alvin and Pearland ISDs started the year with remote learning and integrating students back into the classroom. FISD had planned to do the same, but Hurricane Laura disrupted the district’s remote learning. One question districts will have to grapple with is how the virus will aect transportation for this year. “Unfortunately, it is probably too soon to tell,” said Amy Campbell, direc- tor of human resources for the Texas Association of School Boards. Texas school districts have grappled with shortages of bus drivers for the past few years, and local districts are no exception. As many drivers are older individuals and districts may need to add routes to properly social distance students, some district ocials arewor- ried they may not have enough drivers. “It’s going to be a very challenging year for us,” FISD Director of Transpor- tation Dean Lewis said.

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Pearland ISD employees give buses a thorough cleaning at the end of each school day. (Courtesy Pearland ISD)

CONTINUED ON 24

• Next Level Urgent Care • University of Houston Clear Lake

When COVID-19 hit Texas, A&A Cleaning Services in Pearland, like countless other businesses across the United States, saw a signicant drop in revenue. The cleaning company serves resi- dences and commercial properties from Galveston all the way to Cypress, but Federal loans help local businesses during pandemic BY JAKE MAGEE

JOBSAVING M E A S U R E

the pandemic put a damper on busi- ness, owner Mona Chavarria said. “On our residential end, I can tell you that we certainly had a reduction in cash ow,” she said. One signicant relief during the eco- nomic turmoil for Chavarria and mil- lions of other businesses across the nation was the Small Business Adminis- tration’s Paycheck Protection Program. Under the program, businesses received forgivable or low-interest loans used primarily to keep workers employed. The PPP was a “godsend” to busi- nesses in League City, Pearland, Clear

DISTRICT DATA

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The Paycheck Protection Program gave businesses loans to combat the economic downturn caused by COVID-19. It saved 27,799 jobs in Pearland and Friendswood.

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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THIS ISSUE

CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMPAPAR: This school year, like the rest of 2020, has not been like any other. There is a whole generation of kindergartners experiencing school for the rst time while wearing a mask or learning from their teacher through a computer screen. The challenges our districts normally face are magnied when you add a global pandemic to the mix. Our front-page story is an example of how the bus driver shortage districts had prior to COVID-19 is only amplied. Read more on how districts are handling the shortage on Page 24. Our annual Public Education Edition this month is full of great data for all three of our districts. We are shaping our future generations, and we look to each other for guidance and support. We at Community Impact Newspaper salute all our educators, school administrators and parents as we all navigate this unprecedented school year. Papar Faircloth, GENERALMANAGER

MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Papar Faircloth, pfaircloth@communityimpact.com EDITOR Jake Magee SENIOR REPORTER Haley Morrison REPORTER Colleen Ferguson GRAPHIC DESIGNER Justin Howell ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Teresa Votaw

METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kristina Shackelford MANAGING EDITOR Marie Leonard ART PRODUCTIONMANAGER Tessa Hoee CORPORATE LEADERSHIP PUBLISHERS AND FOUNDERS John and Jennifer Garrett GROUP PUBLISHER Traci Rodriguez EXECUTIVE EDITOR Joe Warner John and Jennifer Garrett began Community Impact Newspaper in 2005 in Pugerville, TX. The company’s mission is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team. Today we operate across ve metropolitan areas, providing hyperlocal, nonpartisan news produced by our full-time journalists in each community we serve. BECOMEA#COMMUNITYPATRON CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Sullivan SALES DIRECTOR Tess Coverman WHOWE ARE

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Now Open, Coming Soon &more TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES 9 CITY NOTES 11 News from Pearland and Friendswood INSIDE INFORMATION 13 COVID19 case data

PUBLIC EDUCATION

THIS ISSUE BY THE NUMBERS

DISTRICT DATA 15 Pearland, Friendswood and Alvin ISDs EDUCATION 17 Friendswood ISD bond plans CAMPUS DEEP DIVE 19

Local sources 17

Businesses openings 5

Pages of education content 8

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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S. SPECTRUM BLVD.

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MCHARD RD.

SHADOW CREE

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MAP NOT TO SCALE N TM; © 2020 COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER CO. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

MANVEL

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NOWOPENREOPENINGS 1 Checkers opened at 7305 W. Broad- way St., Pearland, on Sept. 1. The fast- food chain sells burgers, fries, shakes and hot dogs. Over 70 Checkers and Rally’s locations are opening in the Greater Houston area. www.checkers.com 2 Pearland Primeline Professional Building , located at 2941 Broadway Bend Drive, Pearland, began leasing in August. The 31,000-square-foot building is leas- ing to oce, medical and retail tenants. 713-275-9605. www.naipartners.com 3 Interim HealthCare moved its regional headquarters to the Trinity Pro- fessional Building in Pearland, located at 1920 Country Place Parkway, in June. The national company provides home health care, including skilled nursing and physical and occupational therapy, according to a press release from the city of Pearland and

Pearland Economic Development Corp. The oce will house 44 employees, per the release. 713-230-8329 4 AMC Theatres on Aug. 20 began a phased reopening of 630 locations, including one at 11801 S. Sam Hous- ton Parkway, Houston. More than 400 locations will reopen by the end of September. Ticket prices on reopening day were 15 cents, commemorating the price when the rst AMC screen debuted in 1920. The AMC Safe and Clean program has safety features that include manda- tory mask-wearing, enhanced cleaning protocols and reduced theater capacity, according to the company website. AMC Theaters temporarily closed all locations March 17 due to the pandemic. 281-464-8801. www.amctheatres.com 5 Club Pilates opened at 1765 S. Friendswood Drive, Ste. 103, Friend- swood, on Sept. 10. Club Pilates oers group and private training in pilates for

all age groups and experience levels. 832-862-2023. www.clubpilates.com/friendswood COMING SOON 6 F45 Training will open in Friendswood in late September. Located at 1501 W. Parkwood Drive, Ste. 109, Friendswood, the business will oer 45-minute classes, each dierent from the last. F45 oers over 4,000 exercises, meaning members never repeat a workout. F45 takes parts of high-intensity interval training, functional training and circuit training and incorpo- rates it into the workout with personal trainers. 832-615-8870. www.f45training.com/friendswood 7 The Burger Joint has signed a lease on a 35,916-square-foot parcel along Bay Area Boulevard in front of the Baybrook Mall. The restaurant plans to open in the fall, making it the business’s third

Houston location and the rst outside the Inner Loop. In addition to burgers, The Burger Joint serves sandwiches, hot dogs

and shakes. 281-974-2889. www.burgerjointhtx.com

8 Lake Park Plaza will hold its grand opening in September. The two-story, 18,000-square-foot building nished construction in early 2020 and delayed its grand opening due to COVID-19. Berkeley Eye Center, a tenant at Lake Park Plaza, will open in September. Lo- cated at 1535 Cullen Parkway, Pearland, the mixed-use development is leasing to restaurants, tness spaces, medical spac- es and oce spaces. 713-275-9605. ANNIVERSARIES Founded in 1950, the San Antonio-based fast-food chain Whataburger , which has locations across Pearland and Friend- wood, celebrated 70 years of business

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Aug. 8. Founder Harmon Dobson opened the rst Whataburger location in Corpus Christi in 1950, and the restaurant chain has since grown to more than 830 locations in 10 states. In the last year, Whataburger launched a new, modern restaurant design and began oering curbside and delivery services for the rst time amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to the release. Whataburger of- fers made-to-order burgers, sandwiches, sides and breakfast items. www.whataburger.com IN THE NEWS 9 The Ivy District is making progress on the public park and trail system locat- ed inside the mixed-use district at the corner of South Spectrum Boulevard and Hwy. 288. In July, the train system was poured, and the sidewalks were com- pleted. In August, the Ivy District put up the pavilion and trellis. The Ivy District will start construction on the pedestrian 10 Memorial Hermann named Noel Cardenas the new senior vice presi- dent and CEO of Memorial Hermann A Southeast, 11800 Astoria Blvd., Houston, and B Pearland, 16100 South Freeway, Pearland, hospitals, starting Sept. 13. Cardenas previously served as the vice president of operations at Memorial Her- mann Northeast in Humble. 713-413-5000. www.memorialhermann.org bridge early next year. www.pearlandedc.com

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Macy’s in Pearland donated 300 prom dresses to the Pearland Silverlake Lions.

Checkers

COURTESY PEARLAND SILVERLAKE LIONS

COURTESY CHECKERS AND RALLYS

FEATURED IMPACT IN THE NEWS In late July, Macy’s in Pearland, located at 11200 Broadway St., Ste. 950, donated over 300 prom dresses to the Pearland Silverlake Lions. The Pearland Silverlake Lions hold a Prom Closet event every year to help high school students attend prom. The Macy’s donation has an estimated value of $25,000. www.facebook.com/ pearlandsilverlakelionsclub

CLOSINGS 11 Stein Mart announced Aug. 12 that it had voluntarily led for bankruptcy as it does not have “sucient liquidity” to continue operations. A press release from the company said it expects to close “a signicant portion, if not all” of its stores, including at 19801 Gulf Free- way, Webster, and has launched a store closing and liquidation process. Stein Mart sells apparel, bedding, home decor, housewares and more. 281-554-2611. www.steinmart.com

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Kevin Cole moved to Pearland in 1977 and began serving this great city in 1994 as a member of the Pearland Planning and Zoning Commission. He was elected to Pearland’s City Council, servingfrom 1995-1998 and again from 2004-2010. A CHAMPION FOR PEARLAND Kevin seeks to diversify Pearland’s tax base and take the strain off our homeowners. His PEAR plan describes the path for our next growth cycle and brings primary jobs to our City. Kevin was co-founder of the Greater 288 Partnership that has been instrumental in advocating for improved transportation in our area and culminating the major reconstruction of highway 288 scheduled to complete in mid-2020. As Kevin seeks your vote for Mayor of Pearland, his key focus for safe and reliable traffic flows remains critical to both our quality of life, smart city growth and prosperity. A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSMAN As a Principal of CoveMatrix Development, Kevin offers his expertise in property development, providing ideas and support to area elected officials and consulting services. Over the past 20 years, Kevin has developed or consulted on the creation of 6500 residential lots in the Greater Houston Area, resulting in $1.7B in private capital investment A FAMILY MAN Kevin and his wife, Lisa, have raised four children in Pearland - all live in Pearland and are starting families of their own. They have 7 grandchildren and another on the way. Kevin and Lisa are activemembers of Crosspoint Church. KEVIN COLE’S PEAR PLANWILL TAKE PEARLAND WHERE WE NEED TO GO

P ROTECTION • Police • Fire • Property Values • Flood/Drainage • Blueridge Landfill

E CONOMIC DEVELOPMENT • Expanding and diversifying our tax base

A CCESSIBILITY (TRAFFIC AND MOBILITY) • Safe reliable traffic flow • Manage traffic flowmore efficiently (signal timing) • Improve travel time predictability • Address our needs for growth and mobility through HGAC funding • Update Thoroughfare Plan as a roadmap of the future

R ESOURCE MANAGEMENT • Tax rate is too high • Debt burden is too high • Need spending accountability on every line item (scrub the budget) • Manage the spending on the voter approved bond projects to minimize debt

• Attract clean industry • Retain and Expand our existing business • Workforce Development • Look at market approach to certain areas of the City • Foster small business

C O L E F O R P E A R L A N D . C O M | EARLY VOTING STARTS OCTOBER 13 ELECTION DAY IS NOVEMBER 3 PAID POLITICAL AD BY KEVIN COLE CAMPAIGN

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES Business group calls for public-privatemobility partnerships

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

The Hwy. 288 toll lane project is an example of using public-private partnerships to address mobility issues, Keep Texas Moving ocials said.

BY SHAWN ARRAJJ With the state of Texas facing a projected budget shortfall of $4.58 billion—which comes with the threat of declining mobility funds as key tax revenue sources are weakened—a new group has emerged, calling for more public-private partnerships to keep crucial mobility projects from being curtailed. The group, Keep Texas Moving, was announced at a July 20 virtual press conference by the Texas Association of Business, an Austin-based advo- cacy group that pushes for pro-busi- ness policies. With congestion levels worsening and a mobility crisis looming, TAB Vice President Aaron Cox said private partnerships could help advance projects such as optional toll lanes, which he said could be built faster and at no cost to taxpayers. “We would love to build free roads, but the reality is our tax revenues are just not keeping pace with the need and the growth we are experiencing, especially now that COVID-19 and lower energy prices are really ham- mering the state and our transporta- tion funding sources,” Cox said in a July 20 virtual press conference. The Texas Department of Transpor- tation has engaged in similar projects in the past, Cox said—including on a project to expand Hwy. 288 in Houston—but the department’s authority to enter into public-private partnership projects expired in 2017. However, individual projects can still be approved by the Legislature. Texas voters approved a pair of statewide propositions—Proposition 1 in 2014 and Proposition 7 in 2015—that

diverted portions of oil and gas severance taxes, general sales taxes and motor vehicle sales taxes to the State Highway Fund, which is used in part to fund one-third of TxDOT’s annual budget. Fundingprojects Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar told state ocials July 20 to expect a historic drop in state revenue by the end of scal year 2020-21, with motor vehicle sales tax revenue and sever- ance tax revenue among the hardest hit. The highway fund is projected to get about $1.1 billion in transfers this scal year based on collections from

the previous scal year, Hegar said. However, next year’s transfer—which will be based on collections from this year—is projected to fall to $620 million, he said. Cox said funding was insucient to address gridlock on Texas roads even before the oil price woes. “The need for improving and expanding Texas roadways is outstrip- ping available funding,” he said. “That was true before Texas was hit by the double-barrel assault of COVID-19 and the worldwide fall in energy prices.” Keep Texas Moving is not advo- cating for any specic projects to be prioritized, a decision Cox said would

be up to TxDOT and local metropol- itan planning organizations, such as the Houston-Galveston Area Council. He said a good starting place could be looking at the annual Most Congested Roadways report released by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. With overall state revenue on the decline, Cox said more private funding for road projects would also allow the state to preserve its tax dollars for other needs.

ONGOING PROJECTS

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Bailey Road widening Brazoria County is ahead of schedule on Bailey Road construction. The project entails widening Bailey Road from CR 90 to FM 1128. Originally scheduled to be completed in 2021, the project is likely going to wrap up by the end of 2020, ocials said. Timeline: September 2019-late 2020 Cost: $15 million Funding sources: Houston-Galveston Area Council’s Transportation Im- provement Program, Brazoria County

McHard Road extension McHard Road construction began at the end of August. The project will connect McHard Road from Cullen Boulevard to Mykawa Road with a four-lane, con- crete curb and gutter, divided roadway with raised medians and underground drainage. Timeline: August 2020-summer 2022 Cost: $33.63 million Funding sources: city of Pearland, Hous- ton-Galveston Area Council’s Transporta- tion Improvement Program

Friendswood Lakes Boulevard construction Galveston County awarded the contract for Friendswood Lakes Boulevard construc- tion to Angel Brothers Construction. The project involves designing a four-lane road that will connect the road to the existing Friendswood Lakes Boulevard as it inter- sects West Boulevard. Timeline: June 2020-May 2021 Cost: $4.7 million Funding sources: city of Friendswood, Galveston County, developers

ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF AUG. 24. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT PLFNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM.

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

CITY NOTES

News from Pearland & Friendswood

Pearland City Council discusses 2020-21 budget

Pearlandmoves to hire utility billing consultant

their jobs right now and aren’t going to be able to pay for an increase,” Council Member David Little said. CITY SPENDING Over half of Pearland’s proposed FY 2020-21 budget is allocated for public safety. Here is a breakdown of the proposed budget:

$0.72 per $100 valuation. The budget does not include the $4.6 million needed for street and sidewalk maintenance, though over $1 million is allocated to the fund. Throughout the budget process, several council members mentioned they would like to see more money invested in street and sidewalk maintenance in the future. “It’s been a long time, but we are still falling short on the fund,” Council Member Gary Moore said at the Aug. 17 council meeting. The budget also includes a 2% cost-of-living pay increase for all city staff, which has been discussed among council and the public throughout the budget process. The council also discussed giving all city employees a 4% raise rather than the proposed 2% raise. However, most of council spoke against this measure. “There are a lot of people losing

BY HALEY MORRISON

PEARLAND Over 50% of Pearland’s proposed general budget for FY 2020-21 will go toward public safety, according to a presentation by interim Director of Finance John McCarter at the city’s Aug. 31 public hearing. The budget will pay for 12 new fire- fighters and two new police officers. Personnel requests not approved for the year include new hires in public safety, engineering, parks and recreation, and internal service. This additional personnel would have cost the city $5 million. The city is proposing $89.58 million in expenses in its FY 2020-21 budget with a projected $89.9 million in revenue. Pearland is hosting the first reading for the budget Sept. 14 with the final reading Sept. 28. Council has voted to give preliminary approval to the proposed maximum tax rate of

BY HALEY MORRISON

Pearland City Council meets the second and fourth Mondays of each month at City Hall, 3519 Liberty Drive, Pearland. Times may vary. Meetings are streamed and available at wwww.pearlandtx.gov. Friendswood City Council meets the first Monday of each month at City Hall, 910 S. Friendswood Drive, Friendswood. Times may vary. MEETINGSWE COVER PEARLAND On Aug. 24, Pearland City Council voted to hire Raftelis Financial Consultants for $98,000 to help with the utility billing system. “Having a third party giving us a review is only going to make us stronger,” interimDirector of Finance John McCarter said. The city has changed customer service and replaced management in water utility billing, including hiring Nancy Massey, the new utility billing manager. Massey gave a presentation to the council at the Aug. 24 meet- ing, which included an update on rolling out the city’s True-Up Plan once the AMI meters are installed, which should be in early fiscal year 2020-21. The True-Up Plan allows customers to find out howmuch they owe in billing by stopping the water meter reading system momentarily, Massey said.

Total expenses: $89.7 million

Public safety: $50.6 million General government: $13 million Public works: $12.5 million Parks and recreation: $6.7 million Community services: $4.2 million Transfers: $2.7

Friendswood City Council prepares to pass fiscal year 2020-21 budget

expected, resulting in about $224,000 reduction in franchise tax revenues,” she said. To offset the drop in revenue, staff changed its proposed property tax collection rate from 99% to 100%, giving the city another $156,000 in revenue, Hampton said. Still short $68,000, the city pro- posed reducing general government expenses, including $58,000 in prop- erty tax refunds and $10,000 worth of contracted work. The proposed property tax rate is $0.497314 per $100 valuation, which

is a drop compared to the existing tax rate of $0.521439. Friendswood’s FY 2020-21 budget includes $96.32 million in revenue and $95.76 million in expenses, 48% of which—or $46.11 million—will go toward capital projects. The council will vote on the budget and tax rate at its Sept. 14 meeting. NUMBER TOKNOW Amount dedicated to capital projects $46.11MILLION

BY JAKE MAGEE

FRIENDSWOOD Friendswood staff presented some changes to the city’s fiscal year 2020-21 budget at a special Aug. 31 meeting. Director of Administrative Services Katina Hampton told Friendswood City Council new information caused some necessary revisions to the bud- get since it was originally presented July 31. “We learned that the Texas Senate Bill 1152 regarding telecommunica- tions franchise taxes will impact our proposed budget more than we had

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PEARLAND - FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

INSIDE INFORMATION CASES FLUCTUATE Cases counts peaked in mid-July for both Brazoria County and Pearland. While case counts in August have not been as high as they were in July, neither municipality has observed a steady decline. Data goes through Sept. 3. AS COUNTY HEADS INTO THE NEW NORMAL The city of Pearland is continuing to monitor case counts and act appropriately, Pearland Director of Communications Josh Lee said. “WHATWE HAVE DONE TO SLOWSPREAD ISN’T EARTH SHATTERINGON ITS OWN; IT’S FOLLOWING THE GUIDANCE OF REALLY SMART PEOPLE.”

Coronavirus case data for Brazoria County & Pearland

COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON

BRAZORIA COUNTY DATA

PEARLAND DATA

While August case counts have not rivaled the spike the county saw in July, there has not been a steady decrease yet.

Pearland case counts mimic Brazoria County counts, with the city experiencing spikes at the same time as the county. Pearland’s highest daily case counts reported were July 20 and Aug. 27.

40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180

AUG. 27: 50

AUG. 13: 48

JULY 20: 42

0 20

Josh Lee, Pearland director of communications

July

Aug.

Sept.

ALLTIME CASES: ACTIVE VS. RECOVERIES VS. DEATHS IN BRAZORIA COUNTY

While the average age of Brazoria County residents ranges from the late 30s to the early 40s, the majority of the active cases in the county are in the 20-29 age bracket.

Active cases

Recoveries

Deaths

766

711 795

652

653 702

503 589

402 338

367 356

192 162

148 188

123 91

24

19

2

9

8

0

0

0

0

09 years old 1019 years old 2029 years old 3039 years old 4049 years old 5059 years old 6069 years old 7079 years old 80 years old +

COVID-19 patients have taken up a fraction of the ICU and general use beds available in Brazoria County. Since the beginning of July, the number of COVID-19 patients in general use and ICU beds has fallen.

HOSPITAL BEDS IN USE

240 220 200 180 160 140 120 100

General bed count

ICU bed count General beds for COVID-19 patients

80 60 40 20 0

ICU beds for COVID-19 patients

Aug.

July

Sept.

SOURCES: BRAZORIA COUNTY, SOUTHEAST TEXAS REGIONAL ADVISORY COUNCILCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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Smallest Grant Award: $147 for nuclear chemistry set at Turner College and Career High School

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Rethinking Learning Spaces From desk pedals to wiggle stools, over $45,000 has been distributed across Pearland ISD to create flexible classroom environments which enhance learning.

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2020 PUBLIC EDUCATION EDITION

A LV I N I S D • F R I E N D S WO O D I S D • P E A R L A N D I S D S N A P S H O T DISTRICT DATA COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON Friendswood and Pearland ISDs have seen static enrollment over the last ve years, while Alvin ISD has experienced signicant growth. Starting teacher salaries are also comparable between the three districts. SOURCES: ALVIN, FRIENDSWOOD AND PEARLAND ISDS; TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCY COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER *Estimated STUDENT ENROLLMENT 201920 TEACHER STATS

201920 ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

49.15%

11.16%

30.87%

60.24%

$56,075 $55,688 $56,000

STATE AVERAGE

TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHERS 1,771 376 1,299

89% RETENTION RATE 90.3% 91%

STARTING TEACHER SALARY

201920 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

16.4%

201920SUPERINTENDENT ANNUAL SALARY

2.29%

FORT BEND ISD $363,911 CLEAR CREEK ISD $325,678 NEIGHBORING DISTRICT COMPARISON $247,002 $206,338 $294,902

9.19%

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21*

20.26%

INCREASE FROM 201617: +15% +1% +1%

STATE AVERAGE

15

PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

EDUCATION Friendswood ISD taxpayers to vote on $128million in bonds

MONEY MATTERS The 2020 bonds, separated into two propositions, would fund a new 900-student elementary campus, classroom additions in four elementary and intermediate schools and renovations to Friendswood High School, as well as technology upgrades. Three of Friendswood ISD’s six campus buildings are 45 years old or older. PROPOSITIONA TOTAL: $127.28 MILLION

BY COLLEEN FERGUSON

district’s bond election website. Bond funds will also go toward districtwide maintenance and security and tech- nology improvements. The bond will appear on the ballot as Proposition A for $127.28 million and Proposition B for $1 million. In Proposition A, more than 75% of the funding would go toward two projects: Construction at the new elementary school is projected to cost nearly $45 million, and work on the high school would cost an additional $53.3 million. The $1 million set aside for technology in Proposition B would fund classroom instructional technology upgrades and ber and access point upgrades, among other improvements. The 2020 school bonds are a result of quality community input and careful weighing of options, according to the district bond website. The bond package was pulled together by a citizens advisory committee of 44 community leaders, parents, teachers, students and local business owners. The committee reviewed data from district administration and industry professionals, the district’s long-range master plan and strategic plan, future student growth projections and public input then put together the bond package, per the bond website. The 2019-20 school year saw the largest jump in enrollment in FISD history, Hopkins said. The district expects an additional 160 to 180 students for 2020-21, and 76% of FISD students returned to in-person instruction in August. The south

Friendswood ISD residents can vote in November to approve up to $128 million in bonds after the March election was delayed due to COVID-19. The board of trustees voted at a March 23 special meeting to postpone the 2020 bond election to Nov. 3. If approved by voters, the proposed bonds will provide funding for vari- ous facility and technology upgrades. These improvements include a new 900-student campus on the West Ranch site owned by FISD, which will replace the existing Cline Elementary School; classroom additions to West- wood Elementary School, Windsong Intermediate School and Bales Inter- mediate School; and renovations to Friendswood High School to address career and technical education, ne arts and athletics needs. Three of the district’s six campus buildings are nearing 50 years old, FISD board President Tony Hopkins said, making repairs and additions essential. Delaying the election meant construction and renovation timelines were also delayed; construction that would have started in January will now begin in the summer, which could aect back-to-school plans for 2021-22, Hopkins said. “That basically delays everything by six months,” he said. “We’ll have to … decide if we want to speed things up or slow things down.” The additions at the high school will require land purchases, which would be executed through $1.9 mil- lion in bond funding, according to the

High school additions, renovations: $53.37 million (41.9%) New Cline Elementary School: $44.61 million (35%) Maintenance: $16.46 million (12.9%) Windsong Intermediate School, six classrooms: $4.55 million (3.6%) Westwood Elementary School, four classrooms: $3.01 million (2.3%) Bales Intermediate School, four classrooms: $2.38 million (1.9%) Land purchases: $1.9 million (1.5%) Safety and security improvements: $1 million (0.9%)

High school improvements

include renovations to the locker rooms, auditorium, ne arts wing and education spaces; a new auditorium and gym; and an athletic eld expansion.

PROPOSITION B

TOTAL: $1 MILLION

Core, intermediate distribution frame network switches

Phone system upgrades

Virtual machines and storage array

Fiber and access point upgrades

Classroom instructional technology upgrades

SOURCE: FRIENDSWOOD ISD COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

side of the district has seen a lot of residential growth as housing com- munities are built out, he added. “When COVID[-19] passes, we’re going to be above capacity, and we’re going to have had a six-month delay,” Hopkins said. “When we’re back to normal education, those needs are going to be there.” The proposed bond would increase homeowners’ property tax rate by $0.11 per $100 valuation, FISD ocials

said. House Bill 3 mandated school tax rates be compressed, which means all homeowners have seen an overall reduction in their school tax rate, per the bond website. If the bond does not pass, any ren- ovations or improvements the district could aord would be funded through maintenance and operation funds. Early voting runs Oct. 13-30. Oct. 5 is the last day to register to vote in the Nov. 3 general election.

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PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

18

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Public Education Edition 2020

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT A LV I N I S D D ATA CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON Alvin ISD is a minority-majority school district. A large percentage of its students are Hispanic or Latino, followed by Black and white populations of roughly similar size. Two of AISD’s high schools had graduation rates of nearly 98%.

ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR in 2021, as of press time. The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance. FOR 2020 AND BEYOND

B ALVIN ISD OVERALL RATING Exemplary 2019 RATING

performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of improvement Unacceptable performance

SOURCES: ALVIN ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

1 Alvin

672 71% <10 <10 18 465 0 <10 176 20, 22

2 0 1 8  1 9 D E M O G R A P H I C S

2 Bel Nafegar Sanchez

779 56% <10 26 240 370 0 <30 114 671 70% <10 <10 33 329 0 22 281 614 56% <10 56 <10 226 0 30 295

24

TEACHERS DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

3 Bill Hasse

22, 23

STUDENTS

4 Bob and Betty Nelson

22

5 Don Jeter

730 64% 0 58 215 379 0 19 59 26

6 Dr. Red Duke 7 E.C. Mason 8 Glenn York 9 Hood-Case

631 30% 0 105 211 166 <10 <30 125 567 58% 0 <10 55 297 0 <20 197 876 18% <10 255 217 199 <10 59 143 664 63% 0 <10 <10 430 0 15 205

21

21.2%

12.6%

17.7%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

24

21

23

0.4%

0.4%

0.2%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

10 Laura Ingalls Wilder

857 27% <10 205 278 184 <10 33 154 25

11 Mark Twain

821 73% 0 <20 20 624 0 <10 157

23 25

12 Mary Burks Marek 13 Melba Passmore

591 36% <10 132 241 101

<10 29 84

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

9.5%

4.7%

3%

1.9%

653 64% 0 <10 17 348 0 <10 277 20, 22

14 Meridiana 15 Pomona

446 35% <10 <20 98 166 0 17 147

24

766 27% <10 109 298 161

0 <30 169 26

40%

52.6%

18.7%

27.7%

HISPANIC

16 R.L. Stevenson 17 Savannah Lakes 18 Shirley Dill Brothers

527 68% 0 <10 15 280 <10 <10 220 19 767 54% <10 38 296 345 <10 28 58 26

819 17% 0 240 242 150 0 34 153

21

2.6%

2.4%

2.6%

1.1%

MULTIPLE RACES

19 Walt Disney

443 67% 0 <10 <10 260 0 <10 169 22

DEMOGRAPHICS

26.2%

27.4%

57.9%

58.4%

WHITE

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

DEMOGRAPHICS

Feeder schools

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

20 Alvin

982 61% <10 <20 23 545 0 21 380 27 1,157 30% <10 270 415 278 <10 31 160 29 729 69% <10 25 19 416 <10 10 257 27, 28 811 74% <10 <10 28 544 0 12 220 27, 28

21 Dr. Ronald E. McNair

22 Fairview

23 G.W. Harby

27 Alvin

2,821 55% <10 49 74 1,580 <10 57 1,053 97.4% 1,983 52% <10 83 668 832 <10 42 350 97.5% 2,787 35% <10 564 1123 716 <10 66 309 N/A

24 Manvel

989 55% 0 30 292 444 <10 <20 203

28

28 Manvel

25 Nolan Ryan 26 Rodeo Palms

828 29% <10 195 340 140 <10 22 128 29

29 Shadow Creek

912 54% <10 79 359 365 0 <30 77

28

*RATES LISTED ARE FOR STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED IN FOUR YEARS IN 2018. SHADOW CREEK IS A NEWER SCHOOL.

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19

PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

A FRIENDSWOOD ISD

ACCOUNTABILITY RATING

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT F R I E N D S WO O D I S D CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON Friendswood ISD is home to roughly 6,000 students. The district student and teacher population is mostly white. In 2019, Friendswood High School’s graduation rate was 98.2%.

2019 OVERALL RATING

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

1 C.W. Cline 2 Westwood

806 7% <10 63 12 142 <10 45 540 3 663 24% 0 14 <20 163 <10 16 457 4

SOURCES: FRIENDSWOOD ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS

2 0 1 8  1 9 D E M O G R A P H I C S

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

Feeder schools

3 Windsong 4 Zue S Bales

576 8% 0 48 <10 92 <10 30 395 626 15% <10 16 <10 134 <10 20 445

5 5

1.6%

12.6%

0.8%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

DEMOGRAPHICS

0.3%

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

JUNIORHIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

Feeder schools

6.4%

4.7%

0.3%

1.9%

5 Friendswood

1,464 12% <10 95 26 92 <10 30 395

6

DEMOGRAPHICS

18.8%

52.6%

6.7%

27.7%

HISPANIC

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA 6 Friendswood

3.5%

2.4%

0.8%

1.1%

MULTIPLE RACES

2,092 8% <10 151 39 376 <10 68 1,445 98.2%

69.4%

27.4%

91.1%

58.4%

WHITE

*RATES LISTED ARE FOR STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED IN FOUR YEARS IN 2018.

20

COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

A N I N S I D E LO O K AT P E A R L A N D I S D CAMPUS DEEP DIVE COMPILED BY HALEY MORRISON Pearland ISD is a diverse school district, with large Hispanic and white student populations. However, over half of the district’s teachers are white. During the 2018-19 school year, all of PISD’s high schools had a graduation rate of nearly 100%.

ACCOUNTABILITYRATINGS FOR 2020 AND BEYOND All Texas school districts and campuses will receive a Not Rated: Declared State of Disaster label for their 2020 accountability ratings, according to the Texas Education Agency. Texas students take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness each year to measure standards in reading, writing, math, science and social studies and are traditionally given letter grades ranging from A-F based on performance. Although the coronavirus pandemic is ongoing, the state has said all students will be required to take the STAAR in 2021, as of press time. The ratings are based on several categories, including Student Achievement, School Progress and Closing the Gaps, all of which compare student performance.

B PEARLAND 2019 RATING

ISD OVERALL RATING Exemplary performance Recognized performance Acceptable performance In need of improvement Unacceptable performance

SOURCES: PEARLAND ISD, TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

1 Barbara Cockrell

715 33% <10 84 58 346 0 <30 197 642 29% 0 116 146 186 <10 <40 162

13 14

COMPARING ISD SCORES

NEIGHBORING SCHOOL DISTRICT 2019 OVERALL RATINGS ALVIN ISD B FRIENDSWOOD ISD A FORT BEND ISD B

2 Challenger 3 C.J. Harris

667 43% <10 44 100 274 0 <30 217 12, 13

4 E.A. Lawhon 5 H.C. Carleston

834 56% <10 49 91 537 0 <30 131

13

734 56% <10 <20 133 403 0 21 156 15

2 0 1 8  1 9 S T U D E N T  T E A C H E R DEMOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN

6 Magnolia

896 37% <10 41 74 414 <10 43 321

15

7 Massey Ranch

721 34% <10 64 134 234 0 <40 250 15

8 Rustic Oak 9 Shadycrest 10 Silvercrest 11 Silverlake

666 25% 0 44 47 204 0 36 335 632 20% <10 <30 34 186 0 32 357

12 12 14

DISTRICTWIDE STATE AVERAGE

717

9% <10 225 82 89 <10 56 262

690 19% 0 151 123 131

<10 <50 240 14

STUDENTS

TEACHERS

DEMOGRAPHICS

14.8%

12.6%

10%

10.6%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

MIDDLE SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

0.3%

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

AMERICAN INDIAN

12 Alexander

853 27% 0 29 85 304 0 32 403 888 32% 0 143 94 353 0 25 273

17 19

13 Leon Sablatura

14 Rogers

803 19% <10 148 141 184 0 <40 294 16 905 47% <10 45 176 407 0 <30 250 18

ASIANPACIFIC ISLANDER

15 Sam Jamison

11.1%

4.7%

2.2%

1.9%

DEMOGRAPHICS

34.6%

52.6%

15.7%

27.7%

HISPANIC

JUNIORHIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA

Feeder schools

3.6%

2.4%

2%

1.1%

MULTIPLE RACES

16 Berry Miller

864 18% <10 158 154 194 <10 38 316 20 901 27% <10 43 101 300 <10 39 414 21 849 46% <10 45 172 344 <10 22 260 20, 21 839 35% <10 125 112 342 0 <30 234 20, 21

17 Pearland Junior High East 18 Pearland Junior High South 19 Pearland Junior High West

35.5%

27.4%

69.9%

58.4%

WHITE

SOURCE: TEXAS EDUCATION AGENCYCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

DEMOGRAPHICS

HIGH SCHOOLS 201920 DATA 20 Glenda Dawson

SCHOOL STATS

CAMPUSES HAVE A HIGHER PERCENTAGE OF ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS THAN THE STATE AVERAGE.

0

2,580 21% <10 513 606 582 <10 90 787 99.5% 3,092 30% <30 159 419 1192 <10 89 1,206 99.2% 1,167 34% <10 104 111 506 <10 20 417 100%

21 Pearland

IS THE OLDEST SCHOOL IN THE DISTRICT. IT FIRST OPENED IN 1952 .

Pearland High School Hispanic

22 Robert Turner

*RATES LISTED ARE FOR STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED IN FOUR YEARS IN 2018.

STUDENTS MAKE UP AT LEAST 45% OF STUDENTS AT 23% OF CAMPUSES.

21

PEARLAND  FRIENDSWOOD EDITION • SEPTEMBER 2020

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